ARTS announces the inaugural exhibition at King Street Station, yəhaw’, opening winter 2018

Call for Indigenous Creatives, open March 5 – April 20, 2018

 

SEATTLE – In recognition of the Coast Salish peoples on whose land the City of Seattle is built, the Office of Arts & Culture is honored to open a new arts and cultural hub on the third floor of King Street Station this winter with the inaugural Indigenous-centered exhibition yəhaw̓. The title of the exhibition, yəhaw̓, is drawn from the Coast Salish story of Native people from all tribes uniting around a common cause and lifting up the sky together. In the spirit of the story, this exhibition will celebrate the depth and diversity of Indigenous art made in the Pacific Northwest.

King Street Station. Seattle, Washington.
ZGF Architects
© Benjamin Benschneider All rights Reserved. Usage rights may be arranged by contacting Benjamin Benschneider Photography. Email: bbenschneider@comcast.net or phone 206-789-5973

Reflecting on the Lifting the Sky story and the use of Indigenous language in the exhibition title, Puyallup tribal member Tami Hohn shared, “Our ancestors left us the gift of our traditional knowledge and beliefs by preserving our language. Using our language throughout our communities and projects, such as this, honors what our ancestors have done and keeps our language alive.” Tami is a Southern Lushootseed curriculum developer for the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe and has worked with the language for 25 years. Vi Hilbert’s telling of the Lifting the Sky story as part of the Spring Revels, can be viewed at http://bela.music.washington.edu/ethno/hilbert/voicesVideo.html

In preparation for the exhibition, curators Tracy Rector (Seminole/Choctaw), Asia Tail (Cherokee Nation), and Satpreet Kahlon opened a call for artwork in any media by Indigenous creatives living in the Pacific Northwest. All Indigenous creatives who apply will be included in the exhibition. The exhibition will be a collective portrait of Native America, including creatives of all ages and stages in their careers, from many tribal affiliations, working in a variety of creative mediums. yəhaw̓ celebrates all Native makers, and actively challenges the false divides between fine art and craft, Urban and Reservation, contemporary and traditional. For more information, including guidelines, eligibility, and the application please visit yehawshow.com

“When we open this winter, King Street Station will reflect our unique city, and hopefully become a national model for how arts and culture can support a truly equitable society, empowering individuals, artists, and organizations,” says Randy Engstrom, ARTS Director. “Opening the space with an exhibition that centers and celebrates Indigenous voices is an honor for our office and the first of many exhibitions and programs that will reflect our diverse Seattle community.”

The arts hub at King Street Station will be a new kind of space in which communities of color have increased opportunities to present their work, and be seen and heard. Grounded in community feedback, the programming and cultural space of King Street Station will be an incubator for artists and communities, experimenting with the best ways to respond to community needs in an ever-changing city. ARTS’ goal for King Street Station is to be a resource for the city and the embodiment of the Office’s commitment to racial equity.