People’s Academy for Community Engagement Now Accepting Applications

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods is accepting applications to the People’s Academy for Community Engagement (PACE), our civic leadership development program for the next wave of community leaders. The fall session begins September 27 and runs through December 6.

During the 10-week program, 25-30 emerging leaders (18 years and up) will learn hands-on strategies for community building, accessing government, and inclusive engagement from experts in the field. PACE has a strong focus on Seattle’s community and neighborhood organizations and the city’s governmental structure and processes.

Fall sessions will be held on Tuesday evenings from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. at Miller Community Center. Topics include: Approaches to Leadership, Government 101, Community Organizing, Inclusive Outreach and Public Engagement, Meeting Facilitation, Public Speaking, Conflict Resolution, and Sustaining Involvement.

Tuition for the 10-week program is $100. Tuition assistance is available. To apply, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/programs-and-services/peoples-academy-for-community-engagement/pace-application. The application deadline is Friday, August 12 at 5:00 p.m.

Given the popularity of the program, PACE will be offered three times a year: winter, spring and fall. The winter session will begin in January of 2017. For more information, visit our webpage and for questions, email PACE@seattle.gov.

Join Mayor Murray for this Year’s Find It, Fix It Community Walks

Today Mayor Ed Murray announced the schedule for his 2016 Find It, Fix It Community Walks to occur in seven neighborhoods this summer and fall. Now in its third year, the walks bring together City officials, business owners, and community members to address each neighborhood’s needs.

“These walks provide a unique opportunity for community members to identify neighborhood needs and discuss challenges directly with City leaders,” said Mayor Murray. “Together we invest in a spirit of engagement and community volunteerism. Find It, Fix It Community Walks are one way the City can support neighbors committed to improving their own communities. I look forward to working with community members this year to make these walks a success.”

This year’s Find It Fix It walks will be held in:

  • Aurora/Licton Springs– Early June
  • Belltown – Late June
  • Roxhill – July
  • Judkins Park – August
  • Crown Hill – September
  • Georgetown – October
  • Wallingford – Mid-November

Each walk will follow a route determined by community members on Community Walk Action Teams convened by the Department of Neighborhoods. Specific dates and locations will be announced two weeks prior to each walk.

If you are interested in becoming part of a Community Walk Action Team to help plan a walk in one of the seven neighborhoods, contact the Find It, Fix It Program Coordinator, Hilary Nichols, at hilary.nichols@seattle.gov, (206) 386.1907.

The City will continue to offer Community Project Grants for every walk, which provide up to $5,000 to support community-led revitalization and beautification projects. In 2015, 166 community volunteers, with assistance from City staff, completed 18 projects around the city. Projects included painting a mural on a public staircase in South Park, constructing a community kiosk in Cascade, and planting flowers in Hillman City.

Mayor Murray spearheaded the Find It, Fix It Community Walks in 2014 in partnership with Cities of Service, a national nonprofit that works with cities to provide support and training to encourage civic volunteerism.

Whether your neighborhood is part of this year’s walks or not, community members can report safety needs or city maintenance issues anytime with the Find It, Fix It mobile app. Android users can download the app from the Google Play Store and iPhone users can download it from the App Store.

Landmarks Preservation Board to consider nomination of Lincoln High School for Landmark Status

Seattle’s Landmarks Preservation Board will consider nomination of Lincoln High School in Wallingford (4400 Interlake Ave N) on Wednesday, January 6, 2016 at 3:30 p.m. in the Seattle Municipal Tower, 700 5th Avenue, 40th Floor (Room 4060).

The public is invited to attend the meeting and make comments. Written comments should be received by the Landmarks Preservation Board at the following address by January 5 at 3:00 p.m.:

Seattle Landmarks Preservation Board
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
PO Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124-4649 (mailing address)

A copy of the Landmark Nomination is available for public review at the Wallingford Branch Library (1501 N 45th Street, 684-4088) and at the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods office in the Seattle Municipal Tower, 700 5th Ave, Suite 1700 (206-684-0228). It is also posted on the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods website, seattle.gov/neighborhoods/preservation/landmarks.htm, under the heading of “Current Nominations.”

 

Deadline Approaches for Matching Funds to Support your Neighborhood Project

September 2 workshop for interested applicants
Application deadline is October 5

If your group needs funds to do a neighborhood project, our Neighborhood Matching Fund may be able to help. However, you’ll need to be quick because the application deadline for the Small and Simple Projects Fund is Monday, October 5 at 5:00 p.m. This fund provides awards of up to $25,000 to for community-building projects that are matched by community contributions.

To learn about the Small and Simple Projects Fund, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/nmf/smallandsimple.htm. This is the last opportunity in 2015 to apply to this fund.

The final workshop is scheduled for Wednesday, September 2 from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. at University Heights Community Center (Room 209), 5031 University Way NE. The workshop provides an overview of the Neighborhood Matching Fund, the qualities of a good project, and the application process and requirements. To RSVP, go online at surveymonkey.com/r/ZHM36BJ or call  206-233-0093. The workshop is open to all.

Our Neighborhood Matching Fund staff is available to advise groups on ways to develop successful applications and projects. You are strongly encouraged to call 206.233.0093 or email NMFund@seattle.gov to discuss your project idea with one of our project managers.

The Neighborhood Matching Fund (NMF) Program awards matching funds for projects initiated, planned, and implemented by community members. Its goal is to build stronger and healthier neighborhoods through community involvement and engagement. Every award is matched by a neighborhood’s contribution of volunteer labor, donated materials, in-kind professional services, or cash.

City Light Staff Help Third-Graders with Solar Energy Project

Renewable Energy Outreach Coordinator Jack Newman meets with third-graders at John Stanford International School in Wallingford.

Seattle City Light employees met with third-graders at John Stanford International School in Wallingford recently to discuss the students’ project related to global warming and climate change.

While City Light gets 90 percent of its electricity from clean, renewable hydropower and the utility has been greenhouse gas neutral since 2005, worldwide production of electricity from coal- and gas-powered plants is the leading contributor of carbon dioxide emissions.

At the Stanford school, teacher Margie Butcher challenged her students to propose a strategy with the aim of addressing this concern. The strategy the students picked was to support the installation of solar panels.

Jack Newman and Suzanne DuRard from City Light’s Conservation Resources Division met with the class to discuss the utility’s clean energy fuel mix, renewable energy programs and recently completed solar energy projects, including Community Solar and Sonic Bloom. Students also asked about state financial incentives for the installation of solar panels; the economics of installing solar panels at your home or business; and the challenges of maintaining the electricity distribution network as more people generate their own solar electricity.

“The students were very alert, with each group’s selected note-taker thoughtfully recording notes throughout my presentation,” Newman said. “It was an honor to talk with and learn from such engaged 3rd graders. I am proud of their focus to support renewable energy in Seattle.”

With residential solar installations on the increase, Seattle City Light’s customers are eager to learn more about renewable energy and how their utility will position itself in the new landscape of distributed generation. Jack Newman’s work as renewable energy outreach coordinator serves as one response to this growing demand for solar energy education and community engagement. As the Nation’s Greenest Utility, Seattle City Light is learning every day about the community’s interest in renewable energy, which was highlighted in the John Stanford International School’s solar energy student projects.