New Seattle Electrical Code

City Council approved the new Seattle Electrical Code on September 18, 2017. The new code became effective on October 21, 2017. All projects submitted to SDCI on or after October 21 must meet the new Electrical Code standards. If your electrical permit is associated with a building permit, you must follow the electrical code that was effective when you applied for the building permit.

Key changes in the electrical code include:

  • An increase for the solar system review requirement from a threshold of 7 kw to 7.7 kw
  • Requirements for electrical vehicle charging in new building
  • Requirements to remove all abandoned knob and tube wiring

 

You can find an overview of the most significant changes by reading our 2017 Seattle Electrical Code Proposed Changes document posted on our Electrical Code webpage.  Our webpage also includes the 2017 Seattle Electrical Code replacement pages and quick reference.

If you have questions about the new electrical code, contact:

Ben Scott
(206) 684-5383

Proposed Code Amendments for Stormwater Code Are Now Available

We are updating our Stormwater Code. You can review our draft Stormwater Code Ordinance and our 2017 Proposed Stormwater Code Changes.

The proposed amendments to the Stormwater Code (Subtitle VIII of Title 22 Seattle Municipal Code) include several changes, including:

  • Modifying on-site list requirements
  • Making technical corrections
  • Clarifying submittal requirements for projects

 

Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) prepared an addendum to assess how these revisions affect the analyses included in the February 2015 Environmental Checklist. SPU has reviewed the findings and concluded the proposed revisions are related to the implementation and application of the updated Stormwater Code and Rule. The proposed revisions do not alter the analyses of impacts contained in the February 2015 Environmental Checklist and will not result in any significant environmental impacts.

The SEPA addendum is available for viewing at the following locations:

  • Seattle Public Utilities, General Manager/CEO’s Office Main Reception Area, Seattle Municipal Tower, Suite 4900, 700 Fifth Avenue, Seattle, Washington
  • Seattle Central Library, Public Review Documents, Level 5 Reference
  • Online at http://www.seattle.gov/util/Documents/index.htm

 

How to Comment

Comments regarding this determination of non-significance or potential environmental impacts may be submitted through November 17, 2017. Comments may be sent to:

City of Seattle, SPU
Attn: Betty Meyer, SEPA Responsible Official
P.O. Box 34018
Seattle, WA 98124-4018
betty.meyer@seattle.gov

Questions or comments regarding the proposed amendments can be directed to:

Sherell Ehlers, SPU Stormwater Policy Advisor
(206) 386-4576
sherell.ehlers@seattle.gov

We anticipate making final recommendations to the Mayor by the end of the year.  Proposed legislation for City Council consideration would likely follow early next year.

Revised SEPA Checklist

Washington Department of Ecology (DOE) has updated the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) rules. The new rules took effect on May 10.  DOE has updated the SEPA Environmental Checklist and made some changes to SEPA exemptions.  The updated checklist is available on our forms webpage at www.seattle.gov/dpd/permits/forms/.  You should use the updated checklist when you submit a new application for Master Use Permits that include SEPA review.

Seattle 2035 Key Directions Recap

Seattle 2035’s Key Directions event attracted over 200 people to the Seattle Center last Tuesday evening. The purpose of the event was to help DPD define the important “key directions” for the update to the Comprehensive Plan. The crowd travelled a circuit of stations, learning about and weighing in on a range of topics, including housing, economic development, environment, land use, and transportation. People also enjoyed food trucks, giveaways, and a break dancing demonstration by Unleashed. These extras were a welcome break from the weighty issues being discussed about Seattle’s future. DPD staff will review all the information collected at the meeting and use it to assess and revise plan policies over the summer. But, the conversation will continue online. If you missed the meeting, catch up online at 2035.seattle.gov.