New Year’s Eve Celebration Safety

The year is quickly coming to an end. As we prepare for New Year’s Eve celebrations, we want to remind you that public safety is our number one priority.

We have added additional staff throughout the city to ensure everyone has a safe evening. In addition to these extra officers, we are working closely with our state and federal law enforcement partners make sure all of your safety needs are met.

You can also expect to see additional DUI patrols in and around Seattle. King County Metro, Seattle streetcar and Sound Transit for the first time ever have added free service until 4 a.m. to help you get a ride to and from New Year’s Eve festivities.

The city will also be opening up the Emergency Operations Center to help coordinate city services throughout the New Year’s celebrations.

Please follow us on Twitter for the most up to date public safety information, Seattle DOT for any traffic impacts, and the Seattle Office for Emergency Management for any citywide information.

Move Left For First Responders Working to Clear Crash Scenes

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) declared November 13 – 19, Traffic Incident Response Week, to highlight the work first responders do to keep the public safe.

Seattle Police, Seattle Fire, and Seattle Department of Transportation employees respond to crashes every day. The City of Seattle recognized that this can be a dangerous part of the job and adopted a law to help protect those men and women as they work to clear the roads.

If you are driving and see a first responder parked by the side of the road and using their emergency lights, move to the left. If it is unsafe to move over, slow down. If you follow those two rules it reduces the chances someone will get hurt by a passing vehicle. It also eliminates the chance that you will receive a ticket for breaking this law. Failure to do so could cost you $212.

Seattle Police Traffic Collision Investigations Detective collecting measurements after a serious crash.

To find out more about the people who respond to crashes in our city, check out the Seattle Department of Transportation’s blog.

 

 

City Light System Reliability Work to Affect Traffic on I-5

Seattle City Light crews plan to enhance the reliability of the electrical system by pulling new power lines across Interstate 5 at NE 60th Street in Seattle’s Ravenna neighborhood.

To complete this work safely, crews must intermittently stop traffic on both directions of I-5 overnight for four nights starting on Monday, March 20. Traffic may be stopped for up to 25 minutes between Northgate Way and State Route 520 as crews pull power lines across the highway.

Drivers should expect delays and use alternate routes during construction.

Lane closure details:

Monday March 20 through the morning of Friday, March 24

  • Crews will intermittently stop traffic on I-5 between Northgate Way and State Route 520 from 11:59 p.m. to 4 a.m.
  • Additionally, on the first night only, the northbound I-5 off-ramp to Ravenna Blvd/NE 65th Street and the northbound I-5 on-ramp at NE 50th Street will be closed from 11:59 p.m. to 4 a.m.
  • Washington State Patrol troopers will assist with traffic control and escort drivers through the construction zone. See the map on page 2 for more details.

Customers will benefit since the new power lines will allow switching between electrical circuits in neighborhoods on either side of I-5, thus reducing the number and duration of power outages.

Seattle City Light is the 10th largest public electric utility in the United States. It has some of the lowest cost customer rates of any urban utility, providing reliable, renewable and environmentally responsible power to about 750,000 Seattle area residents. City Light has been greenhouse gas neutral since 2005, the first electric utility in the nation to achieve that distinction.

Motorcyclist Dies After Fall off of Viaduct

Police were called to investigate a fatality collision on the Alaskan Way Viaduct around 9:40 p.m. last night. Preliminary indications are that speed played a factor in the collision.

According to witnesses, a 22 year old man was traveling in the northbound lanes of the viaduct when he lost control of his motorcycle, struck a concrete barrier, and fell to the surface streets below.

Seattle Fire Department medics provided emergency care at the scene, but were unable to revive the man.

Traffic Collision Investigation detectives responded to the scene, processed the collision site and collected evidence.

This is an active and ongoing investigation. Information is subject to change as the investigation proceeds.

Roadway Restoration Work Begins on Stewart Street August 1

Beginning Monday, August 1, the contractor for Seattle City Light’s Denny Network Project (part of the Denny Substation Program) will begin final restoration work along Stewart Street between Minor Avenue and 6th Avenue. This work will affect commuters entering the city, particularly at the Stewart Street exit from southbound I-5.

Anticipated traffic restrictions:

  • Weekday peak hours (6 a.m. to 10 a.m., Monday – Friday): There will be one lane closed and two general purpose lanes and one transit lane open. At times, there will be a split lane configuration of the roadway, with traffic flowing on either side of the closed lane. See graphic for an example of this traffic lane configuration.
  • Other weekday hours (10 a.m. to 6 a.m., Monday – Friday): There will be two lanes closed and two general purpose lanes open, which will be shared by transit and all other vehicles.
  • Weekend hours: If no work is scheduled, there will be one lane closed and two general purpose lanes and one transit lane open. If work is scheduled, there will be two lanes closed and two general purpose lanes open, which will be shared by transit and all other vehicles.

This is what Stewart Street will look like for drivers, starting Aug. 1.

Bicyclists who currently use this section of Stewart Street may continue to use the north curb lane, which remains open during construction. This transit lane is used for right turns by general purpose traffic, but is also marked as a sharrow for cyclist use. All travelers should exercise additional caution during the Stewart Street lane closures. For more information on bike routes, please see SDOT’s interactive Bike Map at http://web6.seattle.gov/SDOT/BikeMap/.

During morning commutes, only one lane will be closed on Stewart Street.

Restoration of the Stewart Street roadway between Minor Avenue and 6th Avenue is anticipated to take approximately three months. This work is part of the Denny Network Project and is the next step in completing the installation of an underground electrical vault and duct bank system on Stewart Street. The contractor and Seattle City Light are coordinating with the Seattle Department of Transportation and adjacent private developments to conduct this work over the shortest period of time possible and to minimize impacts to traffic, pedestrians, businesses and residents.

About the Denny Substation Program: As part of the Denny Substation Program, Seattle City Light is building a new substation and an underground electrical distribution network while designing a transmission line between the Denny and Massachusetts substations. The program will ensure more reliable power delivery to customers in and beyond the South Lake Union and Denny Triangle neighborhoods. The new substation, located on Denny Way near Stewart Street, will be City Light’s first and largest substation in 30 years. The Denny Substation Program will increase system-wide reliability and operational flexibility, achieving a major electrical system upgrade for the city of Seattle.

Seattle City Light is the 10th largest public electric utility in the United States. It has some of the lowest cost customer rates of any urban utility, providing reliable, renewable and environmentally responsible power to about 750,000 Seattle area residents. City Light has been greenhouse gas neutral since 2005, the first electric utility in the nation to achieve that distinction.