2018 Major Projects Challenge Fund provides funding for community-initiated projects

Applications due March 2018

Does your community group have a proposal on how to renovate, expand, or upgrade a Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR) facility or park? The Major Projects Challenge Fund (MPCF), which is a Seattle Park District funding initiative, will provide a funding match to a community-initiated “major project” that is not otherwise covered by an identified SPR funding source. The MPCF will provide up to $1.6 million per year as a match to a significant improvement or expansion at an existing SPR park or facility.

To apply for the funding match, any community group may submit a four-page proposal letter that outlines their project and funding needs. Application letters are due on March 30, 2018. SPR encourages community groups that have a project and matching dollars to apply for funding from the 2018 MPCF. The application process will prioritize community-initiated projects that have a “parks and recreation” mission, encourage public access, leverage non-City funds, and are on SPR property and/or an SPR-owned facility. Click here to view complete 2018 funding criteria.

The City is often asked to provide financial support to capital development or improvement projects that focus on parks and recreation, for which there is little or no City finding available, and interested communities don’t have enough funding to cover the total cost of the project. This MPCF will provide City funding to leverage community-generated funding for projects that expand the life and usability of a park or facility by providing opportunities for more people to use the facility.

The first round of the community-initiated projects, announced in December 2016, provided small awards for feasibility and preliminary design work to help define the scope of potential future projects and awards to two construction projects, Kubota Garden Ornamental Walls and Gates, and Amy Yee Tennis Center Improvements. The MPCF awards were based on screening criteria that included an equitable prioritization scoring matrix, and came recommended from the Seattle Park District Oversight Committee and confirmed by Seattle Parks and Recreation’s Superintendent.

As with the last round of the MPCF, a portion of the funding will be allocated to assist diverse communities and organizations that lack resources for a match. Groups that are unable to identify any match should contact David Graves at david.graves@seattle.gov or 206-684-7048. Mr. Graves can assist groups with the funding process and help identify funding source(s) for submitting the application.

For more information and a list of projects that received funding in 2016 visit

http://www.seattle.gov/seattle-park-district/projects/building-for-the-future.

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Seattle Park District provides funding for Off-Leash Area Improvements

Next two projects require closure of Genesee Park and Woodland Park Off-Leash Areas

The Seattle Park District’s Maintaining Parks and Facilities funding initiative provides funding to improve Dog Off-Leash Areas (OLAs) throughout Seattle. This initiative provides $100,000
annually until 2020 and will improve existing off-leash areas through increased maintenance while providing updates to aging infrastructure.  In 2016, we completed a capital plan for all OLAs, People, Dogs and Parks Plan.  This plan provides a scope and prioritization of projects. The first project completed under the plan was a new fence around the 8.6-acre Magnuson Park OLA.

The next two projects include improvements for Genesee Park and Woodland Park OLAs.  At Genesee Park we are building a new small- and shy-dog area. Construction will begin February 5 and last for one week. During construction the OLA will be closed. The Woodland Park improvement will also install a small- and shy-dog area to replace the fence around the wooded area inside the OLA.  This work will start the week of February 12 and require closure of the OLA during construction. We anticipate construction will last approximately two weeks.

For more information about the project please visit http://wwwqa.seattle.gov/parks/about-us/current-projects/dog-off-leash-areas

To find other OLAs managed by Seattle Parks and Recreation please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/find/dog-off-leash-areas

For more information please contact Shannon Glass at shannon.glass@seattle.gov or 206-733-9313.

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Seattle Parks and Recreation opens renovated play area at Georgetown Playfield with fitness equipment provided by Kaiser Permanente

Seattle Parks and Recreation(SPR) is happy to announce that the Georgetown Playfield play area is open. The play area is located adjacent to the spray park in the northwest corner of the
Georgetown Playfield, 750 Homer Street. The play area renovation promotes health for all ages by providing state-of-the-art play equipment, fitness equipment, and improved pathways and playfield access.

The renovated play area features an airplane-themed composite deck and rope climbing structure for children 5 to12 years old, a smart play structure for 2- to 5-years old, exciting rotating climbing play equipment, and a fun music band circle including drum, chime, and xylophones.  The new fitness zone, sponsored by Kaiser Permanente, provides various types of exercise equipment for teens and adults.  The improved picnic area creates a more inviting community space with additional picnic tables and BBQ grills. New accessible parking on S. Findlay St. and improved paths to the renovated comfort station strengthen the link between play area, spray park, picnic area and comfort station and provide improved access for all throughout the north end of the playfield.

The Seattle Park District provided the funding for this play area renovation and Kaiser Permanente provided the funding for the fitness area. Georgetown is one of many communities that will receive fitness equipment and benefit from the Seattle Parks and Recreation and Kaiser Permanente partnership.

For more information about the project please visit https://www.seattle.gov/parks/about-us/current-projects/georgetown-playfield-play-area-renovation.

 

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Seattle Parks and Recreation launches 2018 Major Project Challenge Fund; Applications due March 2018

Does your community group have a proposal on how to renovate, expand, or upgrade a Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR) facility or park? The Major Project Challenge Fund (MPCF), which is a Seattle Park District funding initiative, will provide a funding match to a community-initiated “major project” that is not otherwise covered by an identified SPR funding source. The MPCF will provide up to $1.6 million per year as a match to a significant improvement or expansion at an existing SPR park or facility.

To apply for the funding match, any community group may submit a four-page proposal letter that outlines their project and funding needs. Application letters are due on March 30, 2018. SPR encourages community groups that have a project and matching dollars to apply for funding from the 2018 MPCF. The application process will prioritize community-initiated projects that have a “parks and recreation” mission, encourage public access, leverage non-City funds, and are on SPR property and/or an SPR-owned facility. Click here to view complete 2018 funding criteria.

The City is often asked to provide financial support to capital development or improvement projects that focus on parks and recreation, for which there is little or no City finding available, and interested communities don’t have enough funding to cover the total cost of the project. This MPCF will provide City funding to leverage community-generated funding for projects that expand the life and usability of a park or facility by providing opportunities for more people to use the facility.

“Great projects and needed studies came from the 2016 round of the Major Project Challenge Fund,” said Christopher Williams, Seattle Parks and Recreation Deputy Superintendent. “This funding initiative provides an avenue for us to partner with community groups to expand and improve our park and recreation facilities. We want to be responsive to the needs of the community today, improve access for everyone and build a strong Seattle Parks and Recreation for future generations.”

A portion of the funding will be allocated to assist diverse communities and organizations that lack resources for a match. Groups that are unable to identify any match should contact David Graves at david.graves@seattle.gov or 206-684-7048. Mr. Graves can assist groups with the funding process and help identify funding source(s) for submitting the application.

For more information and a list of projects that received funding in 2016 visit http://www.seattle.gov/seattle-park-district/projects/building-for-the-future.  For additional questions contact David Graves, Strategic Advisor at david.graves@seattle.gov or 206-684-7048.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Seattle Park District Major Project Challenge Fund improves Seattle Parks and Recreation facilities

Update on community-initiated projects and studies

The Seattle Park District Major Project Challenge Fund (MPCF) initiative leverages Seattle Park District funding with community-raised matching funds to significantly expand the life and usability of a park facility, providing greater opportunities for people to make use of Seattle Parks and Recreation’s improved community facilities and parks. The first round of the community-initiated projects, announced in December 2016, provided small awards of $30 – $96,000 for feasibility and preliminary design work to help define the scope of potential future projects and awards to two construction projects with a total cost of approximately $2 million each. The MPCF awards were based on screening criteria that included equitable prioritization scoring matrix, and came recommended from the Seattle Park District Oversight Committee and confirmed by Seattle Parks and Recreation’s Superintendent Jesús Aguirre after a screening process of the 19 applications received. The MPCF allowed for projects/studies to be accomplished throughout the city. Recognizing that all communities are not equally able to provide matching funds, the initiative allowed for a portion of funding to be allocated to assist diverse communities and organizations that lack resources for a match.

The six completed studies are:

  • Magnuson Community Center Architectural and Engineering Maintenance Evaluation Study
    • INNOVA Architects completed the study and estimates renovation costs at $1.8 to $2 million.
  • Magnuson Park Playfield Development Study
    • DA Hogan & Associates completed a schematic field design and cost estimate. The preliminary project cost estimate is $4 + million.
  • Daybreak Star Capital Needs Assessment and Facility Improvements Study
    • INNOVA Architects completed the feasibility study and estimated project cost to be $4 million for short and long term needs.
  • Madrona Bathhouse Theater Improvement Study
    • INNOVA Architects completed the feasibility study and estimated project costs at $2.3 million
  • Green Lake Small Craft Center Redevelopment Study
    • Schacht Aslani Architects is completing study on the building and programming, and the study will be completed by the end of 2017.
  • South Park Community Center, Playground and Playfields Renewal
    • Broadview Planning and SPR planning staff conducted public outreach over 2017 with attendance at community events, and the community is encouraged to participate in this survey for South Park Community Center’s Major Challenge Fund Site Study https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SPCCStudy

The two construction projects include:

  • Amy Yee Tennis Center, which is proposing to build an enclosure over the six existing outdoor courts that will be heated, lighted, secure, and programmable for tennis year-round. Currently these outdoor courts are only used during the summer months. The project will expand the capacity of the tennis center and enable it to offer more programs to more people. The tennis center is located at 2000 Martin Luther King, Jr. Way. SPR has assigned a project planner; initial planning work has started and community outreach will begin in early 2018.
  • Kubota Garden phased construction project, plus funding for a master plan. The first phase is the completion of the wall to the north of the Entry Gate along with accessibility improvements. The second phase involves an update to the master plan, additional wall work and other potential improvements. Kubota Garden is located at 9817 55th Ave. S.

SPR will be launching the second round of the Major Projects Challenge Fund in January 2018 with proposal letters due in March 2018. Funded projects must renovate, expand or upgrade parks or park facilitates with funding from a combination of City and community -generated funds.

For additional information, please contact David Graves at david.graves@seattle.gov or 206-684-7048 or visit http://www.seattle.gov/seattle-park-district/projects/building-for-the-future

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