Major Marijuana Activity

DPD has developed a proposed update to rules addressing “major marijuana activity,” which includes production, processing, and sales of marijuana. Our proposal includes updates to correspond with State licensing requirements, types of zones where such activities may occur, and buffer distances from facilities such as parks, schools, and transit centers. Our proposal materials are on our Marijuana Zoning Restrictions webpage. More information is also available on the Mayor’s Medical Marijuana Ordinance web page.

Next Steps
DPD published an environmental determination of non-significance on September 17, 2015. The determination notice announced a two-week comment period, and a three-week appeal period.

We will forward our proposal to the Mayor and City Council later this year for a possible decision in early 2016.

If you have questions or comments please contact:

Gordon Clowers
(206) 684-8375
gordon.clowers@seattle.gov

Major Marijuana Activity

DPD has developed a proposed update to rules addressing “major marijuana activity,” which includes production, processing, and sales of marijuana. Our proposal includes updates to correspond with State licensing requirements, types of zones where such activities may occur, and buffer distances from facilities such as parks, schools, and transit centers. Our proposal materials are on our Marijuana Zoning Restrictions webpage. More information is also available on the Mayor’s Medical Marijuana Ordinance web page.

Next Steps
DPD published an environmental determination of non-significance on September 17, 2015. The determination notice announced a two-week comment period, and a three-week appeal period.

We will forward our proposal to the Mayor and City Council later this year for a possible decision in early 2016.

If you have questions or comments please contact:

Gordon Clowers
(206) 684-8375
gordon.clowers@seattle.gov

Pedestrian Retail Areas Comment Period and Project Update

SEPA Comment Period

We have updated our preliminary staff recommendations for proposed pedestrian retail areas. We have also published notice of a Determination of Non-Significance (DNS) on the proposed changes, as a part of the required State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) review. A DNS means that we don’t think there will be any negative environmental impacts caused by our proposal. See our Project Documents page for more information and a list of documents.

The official SEPA comment period runs from September 18 through October 2 of 2014. Send comments about the DNS or potential environmental impacts to:

City of Seattle, Department of Planning and Development
Attn: Bruce Philip Rips
PO Box 24019
Seattle, WA 98124-4019

You can also email him at bruce.rips@seattle.gov.

About Our Pedestrian Retail Areas Project

DPD has been studying a variety of areas around the city to encourage new, and protect existing, walkable neighborhood business districts. These pedestrian retail areas will:

  • Preserve areas that offer a mix of street level pedestrian-oriented destinations accessible by foot, bike, and transit
  • Identify and encourage areas that have potential to transition to a pedestrian-oriented neighborhood business district
  • Encourage more walking, biking, and transit use to and within neighborhood business districts by preserving and promoting active destinations

We met and talked with community groups about our preliminary recommendations, and conducted an online survey that closed April 30th. We have reviewed the feedback we received and prepared updated analysis and recommendations.

A draft of our proposal is available for public review along with the SEPA environmental review on our Project Documents webpage.

For questions regarding the proposed amendments, contact:
Aly Pennucci
(206) 386-9132
aly.pennucci@seattle.gov

Revised SEPA Checklist

Washington Department of Ecology (DOE) has updated the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) rules. The new rules took effect on May 10.  DOE has updated the SEPA Environmental Checklist and made some changes to SEPA exemptions.  The updated checklist is available on our forms webpage at www.seattle.gov/dpd/permits/forms/.  You should use the updated checklist when you submit a new application for Master Use Permits that include SEPA review.

Update on Lowrise Multifamily Code Corrections

On May 29, 2014, DPD published a public review draft of our proposed code adjustments for Lowrise multifamily zones. The changes respond to community input, and are meant to make new lowrise multifamily development a better fit within neighborhoods.

The current lowrise multifamily zoning was enacted in 2010. Lowrise zoning encourages a wide variety of new housing including apartments, townhouses, and rowhouses. The zones are usually located in between mixed-use commercial and single-family zoned neighborhoods; and they play a key role in the production of new housing that can help meet growing demand. Lowrise zoning is meant to allow buildings that are 3 or 4 stories tall.

Some community groups commented that the first wave of buildings constructed under the new lowrise multifamily code were too tall or large. In October of 2013, then City Council President Sally Clark asked DPD to review building height standards in lowrise multifamily zoned areas, particularly noting concerns in the Lowrise 3 (LR3) zones and unexpected combinations of development incentives. After studying recent buildings constructed in lowrise multifamily zoned areas, DPD prepared the draft code changes. The code changes would bring the development outcomes more in line with the outcomes expected at the time of the 2010 major lowrise multifamily zoning update.

You can review the proposed code changes here: http://www.seattle.gov/dpd/
codesrules/changestocode/lowrisecorrections/
.

In addition, DPD issued a State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Determination of Non-Significance (DNS) for the proposed code changes. To comment during the SEPA comment period please e-mail geoffrey.wentlandt@seattle.gov by June 12.