Seattle Presents Gallery: No Hiding Place Down Here

No Hiding Place Down Here
August 20 – October 12, 2017
Seattle Presents Gallery

Opening reception Thursday, September 7, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

 

No Hiding Place Down Here is a multi-media installation by Cuban-born artist Tatiana Garmendia. Partnering with documentary photographer Scott Story, who recorded unsanctioned homeless shelters in and around Seattle, Garmendia created a sculptural tent built entirely out of screen scrim which dominates a temporary encampment situated inside the Seattle Presents Gallery. Because scrim material appears opaque when unlit from behind, the structure promises an illusion of privacy that visually dematerializes with the with the projection of documentary images through it. A soundscape intermingles Garmendia’s recollections of her experience with homelessness with street sounds and snippets of music. The dialogue pierces between layers of the tent and its surroundings – between its solid appearance and temporal disappearance, between private and public space, between personal testimony and environmental input – and parallels the complexity of the interactions between people experiencing homelessness and the city. 

No Hiding Place Down Here is part of the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture’s (ARTS) Dialogues in Art: Exhibitions on Homelessness, a four-exhibition series in which artists and artist teams develop artistic projects on the topic of homelessness. Each two-month exhibition in the City of Seattle’s Seattle Presents Gallery will demonstrate artists thinking expansively about what shelter and stability mean to diverse populations, and examining the systemic causes of homelessness.  

Tatiana Garmendia was born in Havana, Cuba, after the Bay of Pigs incident, and remembers a period of homelessness when she left her country as a refugee. A child of revolution and failed promises, she is moved by archetypal narratives embedded in cultural legacies and private fantasies. Her interdisciplinary work is figurative, meditating on national and private histories, on the stories we tell others and whisper to ourselves. Known for creating narratives that fall between fact and fable, the artist slips in and out of identities, recounting her dedication to them in sculptural interventions, then lets them go. She has exhibited her work throughout the United States and abroad. She has exhibited at the Bronx Museum of the Arts, Art in General, and Stux Gallery in New York. Among the European galleries where Garmendia has shown are the Milan Art Center in Italy, Castfield Gallery in England, and the Galeria Riesa Efau in Germany. Her works are in public collections in New York, Miami, Illinois, California, Ohio, and the Dominican Republic.

Seattle Office of Arts & Culture presents The Nightmare Quilt (Revival), 1988-2017 by artist Beverly Naidus in Seattle Presents Gallery

February 20 – April 14, 2017 at Seattle Presents Gallery in the Seattle Municipal Tower

 

The Seattle Presents Gallery will showcase a new installation The Nightmare Quilt (Revival) 1988-2017 by Beverly Naidus this spring.

In 1988 Naidus created a dual sided large scale quilt of 54 panels from canvas scraps and twine. Originally displayed on a bed in a gallery, one side of the quilt depicted her fears for the future and concern for the present. When visitors lifted up sections of the quilt to see the other side, they discovered her dreams. Too unweildy to move individually, visitors needed to ask for help to uncover the entire quilt of dreams, physically manifesting the artists’ intent to convey that we can’t achieve our collective dreams for the future unless we work together collaboratively.

In the Seattle Presents Gallery, Naidus created 27 new panels of nightmares and dreams, updating the quilt to speak to our community’s current fears, hopes and dreams. She also enhanced the installation to create a stronger atmosphere for the quilt, adding in a mixed media wall of tattered clothing and textiles.

Beverly Naidus, associate professor at the University of Washington Tacoma and an interdisciplinary artist, writer and facilitator of an innovative studio arts curriculum, has been creating interactive installations, digital projects, artist books and narrative drawings for over three decades. Much of her work is audience-participatory, inviting people to tell their own stories in response to the theme being explored. Inspired by lived experience, topics in her art focus on environmental and social issues, including how we are individually and collectively affected by racism, climate change and multiple forms of systemic oppression. Her work has been exhibited internationally, in mainstream museums, university galleries, alternative spaces and city streets. She is the author of Arts for Change: Teaching Outside the Frame, numerous essays on socially engaged art and pedagogy and some recent pieces of speculative fiction. She has taught at several NYC museums, Carleton College, Cal State Long Beach, Hampshire College, Goddard College and the Institute for Social Ecology.

Seattle Presents Gallery will be open to the public on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 12 – 2 p.m. and by appointment at 206.684-0182 or email arts.culture@seattle.gov. The Office of Arts & Culture, in partnership with the Office for Civil Rights, is committed to providing equitable support for arts and cultural organizations. The Seattle Presents Gallery features both emerging and established artists and curators and encourages public engagement in arts and cultural experiences that explore ideas surrounding equity and social justice.

Installation photo courtesy the Office of Arts & Culture.

Celebrating Black History Month in Seattle 2017

February marks the beginning of Black History Month, but residents of Seattle are able to celebrate and learn about the rich cultural history of Blacks and African-Americans all year long. In honor of Black History Month we have compiled a few events to mark on your calendar in February. 

ONYX Fine Art 12th annual exhibit
Thru February 18, 2017 King Street Station, 3rd Floor
303 S. Jackson St.
Seattle, WA 98104
FREE

Truth B Told, exhibiting visual artistic expressions by artists of African descent in the Pacific Northwest.

Northwest African American Museum
What the Griot Said: Black History Month Storytelling at NAAM with Eva Abram
Thursday, February 2, 12 – 1:00 p.m.
2300 S Massachusetts Street
Seattle, 98144

Gifted griots—or storytellers—will enchant young and old with tales recounted following oral traditions. Children of all ages are invited to experience the ancient art of storytelling with stories from around the world or just around the corner. This is our first program for Black History Month to kick off February at the Northwest African American Museum! The storytelling will be accompanied by a public docent-led tour for adults, introducing our new exhibit, An Elegant Utility. Open to all ages.

Rosenwald film screening
Presented by Atlantic Street Center
Thursday, February 2, 6 p.m.
LHPAI
104 17th Ave. S.
Seattle, WA 98144
FREE

Rosenwald is the incredible story of Julius Rosenwald, who never finished high school, but rose to become the President of Seers. Influenced by the writings of Booker T. Washington, Jewish philanthropist Rosenwald joined forces with African American communities in the Jim Crow South to build 5,300 schools during the early part of the 20th century.  There will be a Q and A session with Philip Rome, Julius Rosenwald’s great-grandson. To RSVP contact Marcella Taylor at (206) 454-3923 or marcellat@atlanticstreet.org 

Jacob Lawrence: The Migration Series
Seattle Art Museum
Thru April 23, 2017
1300 First Ave.
Seattle, WA 98101

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of the birth of one of this city’s most beloved artists, Jacob Lawrence, the Seattle Art Museum presents Jacob Lawrence: The Migration Series. Acclaimed as Lawrence’s masterwork, this epic series chronicles in words and pictures the exodus of African Americans from the rural South to the industrial North in the decades after the First World War. Tickets and program information can be found at www.seattleartmuseum.org 

I Am Not Your Negro
SIFF Cinema Egyptian
Opens February 3, 2017
USA | 2016 | 95 Minutes | Raoul Peck
Oscar® nominee for Best Documentary.

Panelists are scheduled to be in attendance for a discussion following the 7pm screening on Feb 3. Director Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished – “Remember This House,”  a radical narration about race in America, through the lives and assassinations of three of his friends: Martin Luther King Jr., Medgar Evers and Malcolm X. using only the writer’s original words.

Black History Month Cultural Xpressions
Sundiata African American Cultural Association
Friday, February 10, 6 – 9 p.m.
Art Show and Reception

Saturday and Sunday, February 11 – 12, opening at noon
Live performances
LHPAI
104 17th Ave.
Seattle, WA 98144

Dialogues in Art: Exhibitions on Racial Injustice
Xenobia Bailey artist talk
Paradise Under Reconstruction in the Aesthetic of Funk: A Quantum Leap, Starting From The Top…!!!
Seattle Presents Gallery
Friday, February 10, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.
Free

Xenobia Bailey has created an immersive installation featuring African-American homemakers and caregivers that honors and celebrates their innovative, soulful lifestyle. The installation references connections to the African-American community and Seattle’s history. These life-sized figures play an important role in cultivating and rebuilding homes and communities, while providing nurturing and guidance for African-American youth.

Dialogues in Art: Exhibitions on Racial Injustice is a yearlong series of exhibitions that explore artists’ and curators’ interpretations of racial injustice and systemic racism impacting Black and African-American people throughout America.

Resonance a celebration of Black American composers
Two performances presented by North Corner Chamber Orchestra
Saturday, February 18, 2 p.m.
New Holly Gathering Hall
7054 32nd Ave. S.
Seattle, WA 98144

Sunday, February 19, 7:30 p.m.
LHPAI
104 17th Ave. S.
Seattle, WA 98144

Tickets are available at www.nocco.org and at the door. Group pricing available. $25 general; $15 seniors and ages 19-30. Free for ages 18 and under and music students.

 

Artist Xenobia Bailey at Seattle Presents Gallery

Seattle Office of Arts & Culture presents Paradise Under Reconstruction in the Aesthetic of Funk: A Quantum Leap, Starting From The Top…!!!, a new installation by Xenobia Bailey

Dialogues in Art: Exhibitions on Racial Injustice
December 14, 2016 – February 10, 2017 at Seattle Presents Gallery in the Seattle Municipal Tower
Open Wednesdays and Thursdays from 12 – 2 p.m. and by appointment

 

SEATTLE (Dec. 14, 2016) – The Seattle Presents Gallery will showcase a new installation by Xenobia Bailey this winter. Paradise Under Reconstruction in the Aesthetic of Funk: A Quantum Leap, Starting From The Top…!!! is the last installation in Dialogues in Art: Exhibitions on Racial Injustice, a year-long series exploring artists’ and curators’ interpretations of racial injustice, both systemic and institutional, impacting Black-identifying people throughout America.

Bailey has created an immersive installation featuring African-American homemakers and caregivers that honors and celebrates their innovative, soulful lifestyle.  The installation references connections to the African-American community and Seattle’s history. These life-sized figures play an important role in cultivating and rebuilding homes and communities, while providing nurturing and guidance for African-American youth. According to Bailey the installation is created as “an exploration for a future of designing and engineering a humane material culture and cyber cottage industry that will address community needs relating to wellness and social and economic development.”

Born and raised in Seattle, Washington, Bailey studied ethnomusicology at the University of Washington, and received her BA in industrial design from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, NY. Her artworks and installations are often connected to her ongoing project Paradise Under Reconstruction in the Aesthetic of Funk. Her designs draw influences from Africa, China, and Native American and Eastern philosophies, with undertones of funk visual aesthetic, the 1960’s, and her mother and other African American rural and urban homemakers. Today, the New York City-based Bailey is best known for eclectic crocheted hats, large-scale mandalas, and tents consisting of colorful concentric circles and repeating patterns.

Bailey has been artist-in-residence at Pittsburgh’s Society for Contemporary Craft, the Studio Museum in Harlem, and the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation in New York City. She has exhibited at the Jersey City Museum, the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York City, the Studio Museum of Harlem, and the High Museum of Art in Atlanta. Bailey recently completed a large-scale mosaic, Funkational Vibrations, for the 34th St-Hudson Yards subway station in New York, for the MTA Arts & Design program. Her work is in the permanent collections at Harlem’s Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture, the Allentown Art Museum in Pennsylvania, and the Museum of Art and Design in New York City.

Seattle Presents Gallery will be open to the public on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 12 – 2 p.m. and by appointment at 206.684-0182 or email arts.culture@seattle.gov.

The Office of Arts & Culture, in partnership with the Office for Civil Rights, is committed to providing equitable support for arts and cultural organizations. The Seattle Presents Gallery features both emerging and established artists and curators and encourages public engagement in arts and cultural experiences that explore ideas surrounding equity and social justice.

Installation photo courtesy the Office of Arts & Culture. 

Past participating artists in the Dialogues in Art: Exhibitions on Racial Injustice series:

Jasmine Iona Brown was born in Indianapolis, Indiana and traveled to five continents before settling in West Seattle. She earned her B.F.A. at Howard University and her M.A. from UCLA. Her graduate study in ancient history and cultures led her to incorporate antique artistic mediums, such as egg tempera, into her artwork. She is fascinated with the human face and the tragic narratives of marginalized people. Brown is the recipient of a 2011 Puffin Foundation Grant to paint a series of Byzantine style egg-tempera icons memorializing a few of the many children of color that are lost to violence.

Barry Johnson is a Washington-based visual artist and filmmaker from Kansas who has had a range of works in visual art and film shown across the U.S. and the world. Waking up at 2 am every morning to paint in his studio, Johnson works tirelessly to create pieces that challenge views on gender, race, sex, and sound. His work is a result of events taking place around the world and in everyday life.

Mark Mitchell is an artist who speaks to social issues through textiles. His contributions to Seattle’s cultural community bridge a number of disciplines, including art, music, theater, fashion, activism, and education. He is the subject of the award-winning documentary film Burial, and presented a performance and exhibition of the same title at the Frye Art Museum in 2013.

Shaun Scott is a Seattle-based independent filmmaker whose first feature film was “Seat of Empire” (2009), a 3-hour long documentary tour of the city of Seattle using archival footage. In 2010 he directed and wrote “Waste of Time”, a historical mash-up of original footage, archival images, and contemporary music meant as a portrait of consumer capitalism.

Sam Vernon earned her MFA in Painting/Printmaking from Yale University in 2015 and her BFA from The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in 2009.  Her installations combine photocopied drawings, photographs, paintings and sculptural components in an exploration of personal narrative and identity. She uses installation and performance to honor the past while revising historical memory. Vernon has most recently exhibited with Brooklyn Museum, Queens Museum, Fowler Museum at UCLA, Seattle Art Museum, Ewing Gallery of Art & Architecture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, the Emery Community Arts Center at the University of Maine, Farmington, MoCADA, or the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts in Brooklyn.

The Faded Signs Podcast by Shaun Scott, part of the Dialogues in Art: Exhibitions on Racial Injustice series

July 18 – September 10, 2016 at Seattle Presents Gallery in the Seattle Municipal Tower

This summer, the Seattle Presents Gallery will be home to filmmaker and writer Shaun Scott’s The Faded Signs Podcast. In two shows featuring conversations with brilliant luminaries and digressions into forgotten detours of American history, The Faded Signs Podcast will ponder what the present will look like to future generations who can only see what we left behind (and not our best intentions).

The Faded Signs Podcast is part of the Seattle Presents Gallery series Dialogues in Art: Exhibitions on Racial Injustice, a yearlong exploration of artists’ and curators’ interpretations of racial injustice and systemic racism impacting Black and African-American people throughout America.

Scott writes the column “Faded Signs” for City Arts Magazine. In bi-weekly dispatches, he covers film, music, professional sports, and the Seattle arts scene for a critical portrait that calls attention to dynamics of race, class, and gender in the popular culture of 21st century capitalism. The Faded Signs Podcast will shine the same light. Interviews, found audio from the vault of pop culture, and creative nonfiction will come together in a treat for the ears and the mind. The podcast will be available free on iTunes and SoundCloud, and on the Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs’ website.

Scott is a Seattle-based writer and filmmaker whose work has appeared in Jacobin Magazine, Seattle Weekly, and the film journal Senses of Cinema. He is the author of the e-book Something Better: Millennials and Late Capitalism at the Movies. His forthcoming book Millennials and the Moments That Made Us: A Cultural History of the U.S. from 1984-present is forthcoming in 2017.

The Office of Arts & Culture, in partnership with the Office for Civil Rights, is committed to addressing, and increasing community-wide awareness about, existing inequities so that we, along with our cultural and community partners, can most effectively work together toward a vision of racial equity. Seattle Presents Gallery features a variety of immersive installations, curated exhibitions pulled from the city’s Portable Works Collection, resident artists, and original artworks. The gallery presents both emerging and established artists and curators, and provides all who pass by the opportunity to engage in diverse arts and cultural experiences. 

Participating artists in the Dialogues in Art: Exhibitions on Racial Injustice series  

Xenobia Bailey studied ethnomusicology at the University of Washington, and received her BA in industrial design from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, NY. Her pieces are often connected to her ongoing project “Paradise Under Reconstruction in the Aesthetic of Funk”. Her designs draw influences from Africa, China, and Native American and Eastern philosophies, with undertones of the 1970’s funk aesthetic. Bailey has been artist-in-residence at the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Society for Contemporary Craft in Pittsburgh, and the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation in New York City. Bailey co-organized a Black Cultural Workshop with the African-American inmates at McNeil Island Federal Penitentiary and Monroe State Reformatory in the 1970’s. Her work has been exhibited at the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Jersey City Museum, the New Museum of Contemporary Art, and the High Museum of Art in Atlanta and NAAM. Her work is in the permanent collections at Harlem’s Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture, the Allentown Art Museum, the Museum of Contemporary Arts, and the Museum of Arts and Design. 

Jasmine Iona Brown was born in Indianapolis, Indiana and traveled to five continents before settling in West Seattle. She earned her B.F.A. at Howard University and her M.A. from UCLA. Her graduate study in ancient history and cultures led her to incorporate antique artistic mediums, such as egg tempera, into her artwork. She is fascinated with the human face and the tragic narratives of marginalized people. Brown is the recipient of a 2011 Puffin Foundation Grant to paint a series of Byzantine style egg-tempera icons memorializing a few of the many children of color that are lost to violence. 

Barry Johnson is a Washington-based visual artist and filmmaker from Kansas who’s had a range of works in visual art and film shown across the U.S. and the world. Waking up at 2 am every morning to paint in his studio, Johnson works tirelessly to create pieces that challenge views on gender, race, sex, and sound. His work is a result of events taking place around the world and in everyday life.

Mark Mitchell is an artist who speaks to social issues through textiles. His contributions to Seattle’s cultural community bridge a number of disciplines, including art, music, theater, fashion, activism, and education. He is the subject of the award-winning documentary film Burial, and presented a performance and exhibition of the same title at the Frye Art Museum in 2013.

Shaun Scott is a Seattle-based independent filmmaker whose first feature film was “Seat of Empire” (2009), a 3-hour long documentary tour of the city of Seattle using archival footage. In 2010 he directed and wrote “Waste of Time”, a historical mash-up of original footage, archival images, and contemporary music meant as a portrait of consumer capitalism.

Elizabeth Spavento is interested in identity politics (particularly as they relate to race and gender), the untapped potential of space, altered states of consciousness and unstructured time. Her practice seeks the fringe as a way to push back against hegemony, and her work tends to favor alternative spaces and community-driven practices. She has curated exhibitions for Disjecta Contemporary Art Center in Portland, OR and Open Source Gallery in New York, NY in addition to exhibiting her own work in Buffalo, NY. Spavento’s most recent project, ALL RISE, was a two year series of temporary public artworks punctuated by performance, video and music on a 90,000 sq. ft. gravel lot in downtown Seattle. She is the 2016 visiting curator for Interstitial, Seattle’s premiere exhibition space for artists working in new media. Elizabeth Spavento currently lives nowhere in particular and works everywhere she is.