Improve your civic leadership skills at the People’s Academy for Community Engagement

Now accepting applications through October 1; classes begin October 13

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods is accepting applications to the People’s Academy for Community Engagement (PACE), its civic leadership development program, for the next wave of community leaders. The Fall Quarter will be held on Saturdays beginning October 13 and running through November 10.

During the 5-week program, 25-30 emerging leaders (18 years and up) learn hands-on strategies for community building, accessing government, and inclusive engagement from experts in the field. PACE has a strong focus on Seattle’s community and the city’s governmental structure and processes.

The classes will be held on Saturdays from 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. at Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute. Topics include: Approaches to Leadership, Accessing City Government, Community Organizing, Building Relationships with Local Media, Public Speaking, Conflict Resolution, and more. Tuition is $100, and there is tuition assistance available.

To apply, visit seattle.gov/PACE. The application deadline for the upcoming Fall Quarter is Monday, October 1 at 5:00 p.m.

PACE is offered three times a year: winter, spring and fall. Applications for all quarters are accepted on a rolling basis. For more information, visit our webpage and for questions, email PACE@seattle.gov.

The post Improve your civic leadership skills at the People’s Academy for Community Engagement appeared first on Front Porch.

Small Sparks Funds still Available for Spring Clean!

If your neighborhood would like to participate in Spring Clean, the city’s annual community clean-up event, Seattle Department of Neighborhoods has a fund to support your activity.

The Small Sparks Fund provides matching dollars for neighborhood-initiated projects that promote community engagement. Community groups can request up to $1,000 to help enhance their activities with funding for publicity, plants, or special clean-up supplies, to name a few. The deadline for applications is six weeks before your event.

For information on the application process, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/nmf/smallsparks.htm or call 206-233-0093. Interested applicants must register in the web-based application system at least two days before applying. 

Spring Clean is Seattle’s premier clean-up event hosted by Seattle Public Utilities (SPU). Held every April and May through a partnership with Parks and Recreation, Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, and Department of Transportation, Spring Clean provides opportunities for residents to keep our city tidy. SPU provides bags, gloves, safety vests and more to help with the neighborhood clean-ups. For more information, contact the Spring Clean hotline at (206) 233-7187 or visit seattle.gov/util/EnvironmentConservation/GetInvolved/SpringClean/index.htm.

 

Neighborhood Matching Fund Supported Black Irish Heritage Celebration March 14

Join the Central Area Chamber of Commerce for its Black Irish Heritage Celebration, a festival to celebrate African-American and Irish lineage in the Central District and Seattle. It will be held on Saturday, March 14 at 3 p.m. in the 2100 Building, 2100 24th Ave S. Supported by our Neighborhood Matching Fund, there will be free art, music,  food, history performances, and workshops featuring the Northwest Tap Connection.  For more information contact Linda Johnson at (206) 650-9570 or caccevents2108@gmail.com.

City of Seattle’s “Find It, Fix It” Offers Mobile Phone Users way Report Graffiti, Potholes and Other Issues

The City of Seattle’s “Find It, Fix It” smartphone app offers mobile users a way to report selected issues to the City. The app takes advantage of technology available on mobile devices, including geographic awareness, to give mobile users a convenient way to alert the City to issues such as graffiti, potholes and streetlight outages, while providing location information that helps City staff respond.

The app, which can be downloaded to any iPhone or Android phone, offers the following service request categories:

  • Abandoned Vehicles: report vehicles parked in a public right-of-way more than three days.
  • Graffiti: report graffiti, including what it is on – parking meter, utility pole or building – so it gets automatically routed to the appropriate department for response.
  • Illegal Dumping: report illegal dumping in a specific location.
  • Parking Enforcement: make an inquiry regarding a parking concern.
  • Pothole: report a pothole.
  • Streetlight Report: report a specific outage.
  • Other Inquiry: this miscellaneous category is for making an inquiry or request, which will be processed by the City’s Customer Service Bureau. Mobile users should choose this category to provide feedback.

Android users can download the app from the Google Play Store and iPhone users can download it from iTunes. The fastest way to find the app is to search on this phrase within quotes: “find it, fix it.”

The app also provides a link to http://m.seattle.gov, the mobile version of the City of Seattle’s website. Windows phone users can use this link to view the City’s full website and “request a City service” under the “Need Help” section near the bottom of the home page.

In addition to the app, you report issues and request information:

  • In person at the Customer Service Bureau located in the City Hall lobby, the Customer Service Center in the Seattle Municipal Tower lobby and any of six Neighborhood Service Centers;
  • Over the phone by calling the Customer Service Bureau at 206-684-2489 (CITY); and
  • At the City’s website at http://www.seattle.gov.

All requests submitted must specify a location within Seattle city limits in order to complete processing. If the location is outside the city limits, a message will display to the user and the request will close automatically.

For help with Find It, Fix It and City services in general, please contact the Customer Service Bureau at 206-684-2489 (CITY).

Beacon Hill Meaningful Movie “Honor Totem” March 20

What can a person do when faced with injustice?  The John T. Williams Totem Pole project rose from the August 2010 fatal police shooting of Williams, a First Nations woodcarver.  The shooting, which was found to be unjustified by the Seattle Police Department, sparked an outcry that extended beyond the city of Seattle and the native community.  The slain man’s older brother Rick Williams chose a peaceful response through an ambitious endeavor to carve a 34-foot totem pole in honor of the Willliams family’s artistic legacy and the memory of one of its most talented carvers.  A poignant examination of how a community leans on the power of tradition, art and clulture after one horrific event, Honor Totem tells the story of a brother’s love and determination to “take something ugly and give something beautiful back”

Special guests for the evening will be film maker Ian Devier, master carver Rick Williams, and leader of the John T Williams Organizing Committee Jay Holllingsworth.

Friday, March 20, 7:00pm (doors open 6:15pm)
Free movie, free popcorn!  Discussion follows movie.
Garden House (2336 15th Ave S, across from the Shell station)
ADA parking and ramp access from the alley