Community Solar at Phinney Ridge Sold Out, Units Still Available from Capitol Hill Project

The Community Solar at Phinney Ridge project is located at Woodland Park Zoo and the Phinney Neighborhood Association.

Seattle City Light customers love the Sun and the energy it can produce.

Our Community Solar at Phinney Ridge project sold out Dec. 11. At 74.79 kilowatts, it is the largest Community Solar project in Washington.  

Cutomers who still want to participate in Community Solar need not worry. We still have about 600 units available at our Community Solar Capitol Hill project, which went live in November.

The 26 kilowatt Capitol Hill system is being installed on the roof of the Holiday Apartments, an affordable housing building owned by Capitol Hill Housing (CHH).  CHH provides low-income housing to over 1700 Seattle residents and actively works to create equitable and sustainable communities in central Seattle. CHH also leads the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict, a neighborhood initiative that works to address Capitol Hill’s most pressing sustainability challenges.

Community Solar lets renters, condo owners or those who don’t want to buy a whole system get the benefits of a solar array built by City Light and shared by the community. 

Locations are chosen for solar exposure and connection to the greater community. The host must have an obvious commitment to and connection with conservation. Customers purchase virtual pieces of the system – solar units – for $150 each. State incentives and City Light energy credits pay back that contribution and should even pay out something extra. When the project ends, City Light donates the system to the host – providing free, clean, electricity to offset their operating costs and further their conservation mission.

Learn more about Community Solar here and sign up for your piece of the Sun.

Power from the Sun and Support for Affordable Housing

Workers install the panels for Seattle City Light’s latest Community Solar project.

Seattle City Light’s latest Community Solar project can provide you with energy from the Sun today and it will help power affordable housing in the future.

The 26 kilowatt system is being installed on the roof of the Holiday Apartments, an affordable housing building owned by Capitol Hill Housing (CHH).  CHH provides low-income housing to over 1700 Seattle residents and actively works to create equitable and sustainable communities in central Seattle. CHH also leads the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict, a neighborhood initiative that works to address Capitol Hill’s most pressing sustainability challenges.

Community Solar lets renters, condo owners or those who don’t want to buy a whole system get the benefits of a solar array built by City Light and shared by the community. 

Locations are chosen for solar exposure and connection to the greater community. The host must have an obvious commitment to and connection with conservation. Customers purchase virtual pieces of the system – solar units – for $150 each. State incentives and City Light energy credits pay back that contribution and should even pay out something extra. When the project ends, City Light donates the system to the host – providing free, clean, electricity to offset their operating costs and further their conservation mission.

Why participate?

  • “This is the democratization of solar power,” says Joel Sisolak, EcoDistrict Project Director for CHH. You don’t have to own a solar system, much less a house. Anyone with a City Light account can sign up.
  • Annual credits pay you back by 2020.
  • Your purchase of solar unit(s) supports Capitol Hill Housing by keeping their operating costs down.
  • Adding solar to the grid further diversifies City Light’s clean energy power sources, freeing up more green, hydropowered electricity to be sold to utilities that burn fossil fuels for their power.
  • Enhance City Light’s efforts to educate customers that “solar works in Seattle.”
  • A successful community solar project at the Holiday Apartments will lead to future community solar efforts directed towards Capitol Hill’s many renters that can be led by CHH itself.

Go to seattle.gov/communitysolar for more details, or if you have questions about the project, please call or email a Seattle City Light Energy Advisor at 206-684-3800 or SCLEnergyAdvisor@seattle.gov.

 

Opportunity to Participate in Community Solar Project on Capitol Hill

Seattle City Light just announced its latest community solar project — a 26 kilowatt system on the roof of the Holiday Apartments, an affordable housing building owned by Capitol Hill Housing (CHH).  CHH provides low-income housing to over 1700 Seattle residents and actively works to create equitable and sustainable communities in central Seattle. CHH also leads the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict, a neighborhood initiative that works to address Capitol Hill’s most pressing sustainability challenges.

Community Solar lets renters, condo owners or those who don’t want to buy a whole system get the benefits of a solar array built by City Light and shared by the community.  Locations are chosen for solar exposure and connection to the greater community. The host must have an obvious commitment to and connection with conservation. Customers purchase virtual pieces of the system – solar units – for $150 each. State incentives and City Light energy credits pay back that contribution and should even pay out something extra. When the project ends, City Light donates the system to the host – providing free, clean, electricity to offset their operating costs and further their conservation mission.

Why participate?

  • “This is the democratization of solar power,” says Joel Sisolak, EcoDistrict Project Director for CHH. You don’t have to own a solar system, much less a house. Anyone with a City Light account can sign up.
  • Annual credits pay you back by 2020.
  • Your purchase of solar unit(s) supports Capitol Hill Housing by keeping their operating costs down.
  • Adding solar to the grid further diversifies City Light’s clean energy power sources, freeing up more green, hydropowered electricity to be sold to utilities that burn fossil fuels for their power.
  • Enhance City Light’s efforts to educate customers that “solar works in Seattle.”
  • A successful community solar project at the Holiday Apartments will lead to future community solar efforts directed towards Capitol Hill’s many renters that can be led by CHH itself.

Go to seattle.gov/communitysolar for more details, or if you have questions about the project, please call or email a Seattle City Light Energy Advisor at 206-684-3800 or SCLEnergyAdvisor@seattle.gov.

 

 

 

Seattle’s Trash to Generate Even More Clean Electricity for City Light

(re-posted from Seattle City’s Light’s blog)

The Columbia Ridge power plant in Oregon.

Seattle’s trash will soon generate even more clean energy for Seattle City Light customers.

Waste Management is doubling the generating capacity of its Columbia Ridge landfill gas power plant in Oregon and City Light will buy all the electricity it produces.

“Even the trash we throw away is a resource that can be used to generate clean electricity,” said Jason Rose, Area Vice President. “We are completing the circle of sustainable practices, maximizing the resources of even our garbage to find new, alternative energy in an environmentally responsible manner.”

Seattle Public Utilities ships Seattle’s garbage to Columbia Ridge for disposal. Since 2009, Waste Management has captured the methane created by the decaying garbage and used it to fuel a power plant on site. City Light then purchases the electricity that is produced and uses it to help power the more than 400,000 homes and businesses it serves.

Currently, Columbia Ridge has the capacity to generate 6.4 megawatts of electricity. The expansion is expected to be ready for commercial operations in August with a new capacity of 12.8 megawatts. That’s enough electricity to power about 12,500 typical Seattle homes.

 

Seattle’s Trash to Generate Even More Clean Electricity for City Light

 

The Columbia Ridge power plant in Oregon.

Seattle’s trash will soon generate even more clean energy for Seattle City Light customers.

Waste Management is doubling the generating capacity of its Columbia Ridge landfill gas power plant in Oregon and City Light will buy all the electricity it produces.

“Even the trash we throw away is a resource that can be used to generate clean electricity,” said Jason Rose, Area Vice President. “We are completing the circle of sustainable practices, maximizing the resources of even our garbage to find new, alternative energy in an environmentally responsible manner.”

Seattle Public Utilities ships Seattle’s garbage to Columbia Ridge for disposal. Since 2009, Waste Management has captured the methane created by the decaying garbage and used it to fuel a power plant on site. City Light then purchases the electricity that is produced and uses it to help power the more than 400,000 homes and businesses it serves.

Currently, Columbia Ridge has the capacity to generate 6.4 megawatts of electricity. The expansion is expected to be ready for commercial operations in August with a new capacity of 12.8 megawatts. That’s enough electricity to power about 12,500 typical Seattle homes.

More generators like these are being added at Columbia Ridge to generate more clean electricity from Seattle’s trash.

“Adding the increased generation from Columbia Ridge to our energy portfolio helps us meet our customers’ electricity needs, continue our status as a carbon-neutral utility and meet the new renewable energy goals of Initiative 937,” City Light General Manager and CEO Jorge Carrasco said.

“Opportunities like this are how we limit our environmental impact while delivering reliable electricity to our customer-owners at some of the lowest prices in the country,” he said. “It’s another example of why we are the nation’s greenest utility.”

Seattle City Light is the 10th largest public electric utility in the United States. It has some of the lowest cost customer rates of any urban utility, providing reliable, renewable and environmentally responsible power to about 750,000 Seattle area residents. City Light has been greenhouse gas neutral since 2005, the first electric utility in the nation to achieve that distinction.