Art coming to a park near you

The new Seattle Park District is enlivening the region with more art, more events and more fun with the Put the Arts in Parks program.

The Put the Arts in Parks program is a partnership between the Office of Arts & Culture and Seattle Parks and Recreation, celebrating diversity, building community connections, and energizing parks while connecting with underserved communities. A feature of the program is temporary art installations in public parks throughout the city.

Beginning in June, seven temporary artworks will be installed in four parks, Ballard Commons Park, Cal Anderson Park, Delridge Playfield, Duwamish Waterway Park and Lake City Mini Park.

The first artwork installed is Water-QW U? by artist Melissa Koch at Lake City Mini Park.

‘Qw U? – ‘WATER’  is a temporary art installation that celebrates the sacredness of water. The project is inspired by the wetlands, marshes and streams found in the Lake City area and honors the Duwamish tribe known as hah-chu-ahbsh (Lake People) who were the original inhabitants of the land with their settlements along Lake Washington.

The artwork consists of imagery that has been cut out of Tyvek and is inspired by local mythologies and the nature of water in its varying forms: raining, coursing, flowing, rippling, rolling, splashing, shimmering, as the element that supports life and connects us to one another and to our environment.

 

The artwork will hang from the back side of an existing concrete archway in the Lake City Mini Park through August 8, 2016. Funding is made possible through the Seattle Parks District.

For more information about Put the Arts in Parks programs and art installations check out the Put the Arts in Parks brochure.

Melissa Koch combines drawing, painting, collage, printmaking and more recently, mixed media and cut Tyvek installations to create multi layered visual narratives that explore myths and stories. She participated in the Office of Arts & Culture’s 2016 Public Art Boot Camp. Her art practice and creative life are ongoing commitments to innovating and exploring new ideas not only technically and aesthetically, but also on a human and ecological level.

Installation images by Jenny Crooks.

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ARTS adds parking… for thoughts, in Ballard

 

A new temporary art installation, PARK YOUR THOUGHTS by artist Blanca Santander has transformed a slice of Ballard Commons into a public poetry corner as people Park their Thoughts, free of charge. Santander’s artwork consists of a large black monolith with word tiles attached with Velcro on the surface.

This interactive installation encourages visitors to engage and express themselves with street poetry. The words on the tiles spring from the local community’s input and fosters expression, inclusion, acceptance, family, nature and life. The artwork empowers people to compose poems and thoughts to share with the community. Funding is made possible through the Seattle Parks District.

Blanca Santander majored in fine arts and studied painting, drawing, sculpture, engraving, photography, and art history. She was influenced by great post-impressionist and modern masters, Chagall, Modigliani, and Klimt. Santander’s paintings are intimate, spiritual and feminine and connected with Pachamama, or Mother Nature. She has exhibited her work at the Seattle Municipal Tower Ethnic Heritage Gallery, City of Kent Centennial Center Gallery and the Sacred Circle Gallery in the Daybreak Star Cultural Center.

Installation images by Jenny Crooks.

 

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My Home, exploring the meaning of home

For the temporary art installation My Home, artist Elise Koncsek provides a voice for Seattleites experiencing homelessness and a space/forum/outlet to publicly share their needs and ideas for housing solutions. The installation will consist of approximately 15 painted laser cut wood panels suspended from the arch at Lake City Mini Park. The central panel will represent the concept of “Home” and will be surrounded by other brightly painted panels that contain definitions of the concept of home offered by homeless and refugee Seattleites that Koncsek worked with to create the installation.

Koncsek’s aim is to spark discussion about homelessness in our city and encourage inclusion of people receiving housing services in the designing of service programs. My Home was created in collaboration with Consuela Thomas, Sylvester Young Jr., Crissy, Haregu Kahsory, JR, Olivia & Hailey, Lwam Tesfay, Mya “Baby Girl” Haggard, Daniel “Bad Boy” Haggard, Tsedale Woldesemaya, Robert M. Stevens, Ayan Ali, Dahlak Andemariam, Karlie Taylor, Willie III, and the staff at Mary’s Place Family Center. Special thanks to Artech for their Public Art Grant which provided installation support and Zot Lasers for laser cutting services.

Funding is made possible through the Seattle Park District.

Art coming to a park near you

The new Seattle Park District is enlivening the region with more art, more events and more fun with the Put the Arts in Parks program.

The Put the Arts in Parks program is a partnership between the Office of Arts & Culture and Seattle Parks and Recreation, celebrating diversity, building community connections, and energizing parks while connecting with underserved communities. A feature of the program is temporary art installations in public parks throughout the city.

Beginning in June, seven temporary artworks will be installed in four parks, Ballard Commons Park, Cal Anderson Park, Delridge Playfield, Duwamish Waterway Park and Lake City Mini Park.

The first artwork installed is Water-QW U? by artist Melissa Koch at Lake City Mini Park.

‘Qw U? – ‘WATER’  is a temporary art installation that celebrates the sacredness of water. The project is inspired by the wetlands, marshes and streams found in the Lake City area and honors the Duwamish tribe known as hah-chu-ahbsh (Lake People) who were the original inhabitants of the land with their settlements along Lake Washington.

The artwork consists of imagery that has been cut out of Tyvek and is inspired by local mythologies and the nature of water in its varying forms: raining, coursing, flowing, rippling, rolling, splashing, shimmering, as the element that supports life and connects us to one another and to our environment.

 

The artwork will hang from the back side of an existing concrete archway in the Lake City Mini Park through August 8, 2016. Funding is made possible through the Seattle Parks District.

For more information about Put the Arts in Parks programs and art installations check out the Put the Arts in Parks brochure.

Melissa Koch combines drawing, painting, collage, printmaking and more recently, mixed media and cut Tyvek installations to create multi layered visual narratives that explore myths and stories. She participated in the Office of Arts & Culture’s 2016 Public Art Boot Camp. Her art practice and creative life are ongoing commitments to innovating and exploring new ideas not only technically and aesthetically, but also on a human and ecological level.

Installation images by Jenny Crooks.

***

ARTS adds parking… for thoughts, in Ballard

 

A new temporary art installation, PARK YOUR THOUGHTS by artist Blanca Santander has transformed a slice of Ballard Commons into a public poetry corner as people Park their Thoughts, free of charge. Santander’s artwork consists of a large black monolith with word tiles attached with Velcro on the surface.

This interactive installation encourages visitors to engage and express themselves with street poetry. The words on the tiles spring from the local community’s input and fosters expression, inclusion, acceptance, family, nature and life. The artwork empowers people to compose poems and thoughts to share with the community. Funding is made possible through the Seattle Parks District.

Blanca Santander majored in fine arts and studied painting, drawing, sculpture, engraving, photography, and art history. She was influenced by great post-impressionist and modern masters, Chagall, Modigliani, and Klimt. Santander’s paintings are intimate, spiritual and feminine and connected with Pachamama, or Mother Nature. She has exhibited her work at the Seattle Municipal Tower Ethnic Heritage Gallery, City of Kent Centennial Center Gallery and the Sacred Circle Gallery in the Daybreak Star Cultural Center.

Installation images by Jenny Crooks.

 

***

My Home, exploring the meaning of home

For the temporary art installation My Home, artist Elise Koncsek provides a voice for Seattleites experiencing homelessness and a space/forum/outlet to publicly share their needs and ideas for housing solutions. The installation will consist of approximately 15 painted laser cut wood panels suspended from the arch at Lake City Mini Park. The central panel will represent the concept of “Home” and will be surrounded by other brightly painted panels that contain definitions of the concept of home offered by homeless and refugee Seattleites that Koncsek worked with to create the installation.

Koncsek’s aim is to spark discussion about homelessness in our city and encourage inclusion of people receiving housing services in the designing of service programs. My Home was created in collaboration with Consuela Thomas, Sylvester Young Jr., Crissy, Haregu Kahsory, JR, Olivia & Hailey, Lwam Tesfay, Mya “Baby Girl” Haggard, Daniel “Bad Boy” Haggard, Tsedale Woldesemaya, Robert M. Stevens, Ayan Ali, Dahlak Andemariam, Karlie Taylor, Willie III, and the staff at Mary’s Place Family Center. Special thanks to Artech for their Public Art Grant which provided installation support and Zot Lasers for laser cutting services.

Funding is made possible through the Seattle Park District.

Seattle Parks and Recreation publishes your guide to summer fun in Seattle Parks

Put the Art in Parks, events and art installations now through September 

 

The Put the Arts in Parks 2016 brochure is now available and includes an exciting summer of events funded by the program in its pilot year. Made possible by the Seattle Park District, the Put the Arts in Parks program is a partnership between the Office of Arts & Culture and Seattle Parks and Recreation seeking to enliven Seattle parks by promoting arts and culture, celebrating diversity, building community connections, and energizing parks while connecting with underserved communities. “Seattle has wonderful and distinctive art throughout our parks, and this exciting initiative will build on that,” said Jesús Aguirre, Superintendent of Seattle Parks and Recreation.

Put the Arts in Parks is funding 39 events, series, and art installations through September 2016, providing $199,400 in support to community-based organizations and artists. The brochure is a comprehensive guide to all funded projects, including community festivals, dance and art workshops, music concerts, and more. Copies of the brochure will be available at all community centers, Teen Life Centers, Neighborhood Service Centers, and public libraries within two weeks. All events are free and open to the public.

Arts in the Parks grants support community festivals, art installations

24 organizations, seven temporary artworks receive $200,000 

SEATTLE, (February 22, 2016) —The Seattle Office of Arts & Culture in conjunction with Seattle Parks and Recreation today announced $198,400 in funding awards and artist selections for the Put the Arts in Parks pilot program.

One of the first programs for the new Seattle Parks District, the grant will provide support for arts festivals and events and temporary art installations in parks across the city. These events and installations will activate and encourage the vibrant cultural work being done in and by communities throughout Seattle.

“Seattle’s parks and natural beauty are the centerpiece of our vibrant city,” says Mayor Murray. “The Seattle Park District is integral to activating and improving that amazing legacy. Put the Arts in Parks, one of the first projects funded by the district, celebrates all our city’s diverse cultures in our open spaces.”

This pilot program will support 24 events organized by neighborhood arts councils and community-based groups that are seeking to activate Seattle parks with new and established festivals or events that promote arts and cultural participation.

Highlights include the Othello Park International Music and Arts Festival, a showcase of southeast Seattle’s rich cultural heritage featuring authentic music, dance and food from East Africa, the South Pacific Islands, the Filipinas, Latin America, and more (August); Jimi in the Park, celebrating the re-opening of Jimi Hendrix Park and the opening of the Northwest African American Museum’s exhibition Jimi in the Park (September); The Art & Culture of Lucha Libre, a celebration of one of the most popular sports in Mexico—wrestling with high-flying, acrobatic moves in South Park (July); and the Luminata Lantern Walk at Green Lake, an annual autumnal celebration that boasts an illuminated, hand-built lantern parade. (September).

“Thanks to Seattle voters and the Seattle Park District, the Put Arts in Parks program provides a great opportunity for art and artists to activate and energize neighborhood parks,” said Jesús Aguirre, Superintendent of Seattle Parks and Recreation. “We look forward to collaborating with artists and community organizations on this program. This is one of many projects and improvements funded by the Seattle Park District throughout the city.”

In addition seven artists have been selected to create temporary artworks in parks across the city. Selected artists include Barbara de Pirro, Ryan Feddersen, Sierra Graves, Elsie Koncsek, Blanca Santander, Melissa Koch, and Anne-Marie Stillion. Artworks will be installed throughout 2016.

Approved by voters in 2014, the Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously acquired sites. 2016 is the first full year of implementation and will include funding to tackle the $267-million major maintenance backlog; and will fund the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of the urban forest; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs and art activations for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land. For more information, please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/ParkDistrict/default.htm.

For more information on funding opportunities and the Office of Arts & Culture, go here: http://www.seattle.gov/arts/grants