Cultural Space Incentive Zoning Update

The Seattle Office of Planning and Community Development (OPCD) is continuing to solicit feedback on the initial proposal to update Incentive Zoning. One of the options that they are hoping to solicit feedback on is adding a new option for developers to earn extra floor area by providing Cultural Space. This first round of public engagement is scheduled to continue until the end of September, so please share your thoughts and ideas with them around this exciting and important work.

As part of this work, draft standards for all public amenities are now available on OPCD’s website. The Proposed Amenity Standards document contains proposed requirements for location, access, layout, landscaping, furnishings, and other areas for 10 public amenities, such as urban plazas, hillclimb assists, and public bathrooms, that can be used to achieve extra floor area.

If you have any questions or comments on the Amenity Standards or the Incentive Zone Update, please contact Brennon Staley at brennon.staley@seattle.gov or (206) 684-4625.

Beacon Hill Public Art Bike Tour

Grab your helmets and join us for a FREE bicycle tour of public art in the Beacon Hill neighborhood.

Partnering with Seattle Neighborhood Greenways, the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture is offering a family-friendly, seven-mile (round trip) bike tour for all ages and abilities that will take you from Jimi Hendrix Park/Northwest African-American Museum to Jefferson Park.

We will stop to view these public artworks—including the four sites below in the City’s collection—and more, including at the Centilia Cultural Center at El Centro:

Artists Elizabeth Conner (Drawing the Land and Painting and Sculpting the Land) and Gerard Tsutakawa (Urban Peace Circle), and others will join us to talk about their artworks. Participants will also learn about other bike routes in the region that feature prominent public artworks.

Date: Saturday, September 15
Tour Time: 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Tour starts: Jimi Hendrix Park, 2400 S Massachusetts St. (24th Ave S & S Massachusetts St). Meet at the shelter (pictured here).

This easy-paced tour will take you on public streets, bicycle lanes and multi-use trails. Participants need to provide their own bike (or use a dock-less ride share bike) and helmets are required.

The City of Seattle Awards $400,000 to Help Improve Digital Equity

Photo courtesy YouthCare, a 2018 recipient

 The Technology Matching Fund grants will be offered for the 21st year in a row to organizations in Seattle working on improving lives through technology literacy

The Seattle City Council unanimously approved $400,000 in Technology Matching Funds be awarded to 12 local organizations. These grants are given out annually to uphold the commitment by the City of Seattle as outlined in the Digital Equity Initiative. The goal of the initiative is to improve connectivity, digital skills training, and provide devices, and technology support to communities that might not have equitable access.

“Furthering technology equity and access is an important way to create opportunity for historically underserved neighborhoods,” said Mayor Jenny A. Durkan. “These investments allow our communities to capitalize on technology and job training while making a more inclusive city.”

This year, projects receiving funds will support a broad range of community-driven, collaborative solutions to achieve digital equity in Seattle. They will reach over 8,300 residents, including immigrants, refugees, seniors, youth, and people with disabilities.

“It’s a pleasure to be part of this process each year as we build this relationship with organizations that are making a difference in making technology more available to everyone,” said Seattle City Council President Bruce Harrell. “We inch closer to digital equity each year when we allocate this funding. I’m especially pleased to see this funding package emphasizes programs that work with adults and youths experiencing homelessness.”

City funding for the awards is matched by the community through additional cash, donations of hardware, software, supplies and labor. A one-half to one match is required of each organization receiving funding; however, the community contribution is often greater than the City’s support. This year’s projects are projected to provide more than $300,000 in community matching resources.

“It’s a pleasure to award these grants that help build vital skills like job hunting, helping kids with homework, and accessing government services,” said Tracye Cantrell, Acting Director of Seattle Information Technology. “Through increased outreach to the community, we saw a greater number of submissions this year from a diverse pool of applicants, which is exciting.”

The 2018 Technology Matching Fund award recipients and their projects:

  • Community Passageways: Technology Equity for Young Adults of Color
  • East African Community Services: 2018 Technology Matching Fund
  • Garinagu HounGua: Garifuna Digital Literacy Workshop Series
  • Helping Link: Mobile Computer and iPad Literacy Lab
  • Literacy Source: Open Doors – Increasing Basic Digital Literacy
  • Millionair Club Charity: Computer Lab Expansion/Update
  • PROVAIL: Adaptive Technology for Children with Disabilities
  • Seattle Neighborhood Group: Building Our Bridge: Crossing the Digital Divide
  • Somali Family Safety Task Force: 2018 Digital Literacy in West Seattle
  • South East Effective Development: Technology Builds Community
  • United Indians of All Tribes Foundation: Broadband and Public Computer/Internet Access
  • YouthCare: Employment Technology Supports for Homeless Youth (pictured above)

To learn more about the City of Seattle’s commitment to Digital Equity and the Technology Matching Fund, visit http://www.seattle.gov/tech/initiatives/digital-equity/technology-matching-fund.

Temporary art on the new Rainier Valley Neighborhood Greenway

Opening celebration for Rainier Valley Neighborhood Greenway and Art Interruptions on Saturday, August 11th from 12 – 4pm at the Rainier Beach Playfield

 

The Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT), in partnership with the Office of Arts & Culture (ARTS), will be celebrating the opening of the Rainier Valley Neighborhood Greenway and Art Interruptions on Saturday August 11th from 12 – 4 p.m. at the Rainier Beach Playfield.

The Neighborhood Greenway is a route over 6 miles stretching from the Rainier Beach Branch of the Seattle Public Library to Mount Baker. The route includes improvements like crosswalks, curb ramps, speed humps, and pavement repairs that make walking and biking around the neighborhood easier.

SDOT and ARTS commissioned seven emerging public artists to create temporary art installations along the Rainier Valley Neighborhood Greenway for Art Interruptions 2018. The artworks inhabit city sidewalks and parks and offer passers-by a brief interruption in their day, eliciting a moment of surprise, beauty, contemplation or humor. Participating artists are Susan Ringstad-Emery, Angie Hinojos Yusuf, Karey Kessler, Miya Sukune, Isobel Davis, Lana Blinderman, and Lawrence Pitre. Art Interruptions is funded by the Seattle Department of Transportation 1% for Arts Funds.

All community members and kids are invited to join in the celebration on August 11. The following organizations will be at the event:

  • Parks Department Greenway Initiative
  • Trees for Neighborhoods – apply for free trees
  • Seattle Department of Transportation – vision zero information and games
  • Office of Arts & Culture – art scavenger hunt with a chance to win a free popsicle
  • Info on making your street a “Play Street”

 Seattle Department Depart of Transportation delivering a high-quality transportation system for Seattle www.seattle.gov/transportation

Mayor Durkan Creates Innovation Advisory Council

Mayor Durkan signed an Executive Order creating the City of Seattle’s first-ever Innovation Advisory Council (IAC) to harness the power of technology to create innovative strategies and solutions to the most urgent challenges facing Seattle and our region – from homelessness to transportation. Find the full press release here. Watch the full press conference on the Seattle Channel.

Some key things to know about the announcement:

  • Mayor Durkan is bringing together some of our region’s most innovative companies and organizations to address the City’s most urgent challenges – from homelessness to transportation.

Seattle has always invented the future, and we have some of the world’s most innovative companies right in our backyard.

Smart cities harness the power of technology and innovation in their community – and that’s exactly what Seattle is doing.

From homelessness to transportation to affordability, we need shared solutions that bring government, business, labor, philanthropy, and communities to the table. Initial commitments for the IAC by Amazon, Artefact Group, Expedia Group, Flying Fish, Microsoft, Tableau, Washington Technology Industry Association and Zillow Group.

The council will identify opportunities where technology and data can be used to help Seattle improve its processes.