Wanted: Musician/Composer for Fremont Bridge Residency

The Seattle Office of Arts & Culture (ARTS), in partnership with the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT), seeks a practicing composer and/or musician to be an Artist-in Residence in the northwest tower of the Fremont Bridge. The selected composer and/or musician will undertake an in-depth exploration of the historic bridge’s role and meaning for the city of Seattle and create music in response to this residency.

The project budget is $10,000 USD ($5,000 for residency, $5,000 for sound project, presentation, documentation), inclusive of all residency costs, project, presentation, documentation of the work, and applicable taxes. Payment will be made in installments based on benchmarks established by ARTS in consultation with the artist.

Eligibility

The call is open to established professional musicians/composers living in Seattle or within 100 miles of Seattle. The artist selection panel will consider artistic diversity as one factor in the selection process. Artists who are well represented or have received City Artist grants may not be prioritized as highly as those who have not. Students are not eligible to apply.

Deadline

11 p.m., Tuesday, March 20, 2018. (Pacific Standard Time)

Application

Apply on CaFÉ. For assistance with the CaFÉ online application process, contact CaFÉ tech support or call them at (888) 562-7232, Monday-Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pacific Standard Time.

Info

Please email Kristen Ramirez or call 206.615.1095 with any questions about this project.

Photo by Joe Mabel.

Mayor Murray announces $1.1 million in matching fund awards for community-based projects

Mayor Ed Murray has announced an investment of $1,182,400 to support 28 community-initiated projects across the City. The awards are from the Neighborhood Matching Fund’s Community Partnership Fund which provides awards of up to $100,000 to community organizations committed to fostering and building our community. The awards range from $10,500 to $100,000 with the 28 organizations pledging a total of $1,729,494 in community match resources of locally raised money, donated materials, in-kind professional services and volunteer hours.

“Through the Neighborhood Matching Fund, the City helps to support the efforts of the many community members whose creativity and hard work make this a more vibrant, interesting, and inclusive city for everyone,” said Mayor Murray. “From providing free classical concerts to creating a youth fitness challenge to celebrating the rich heritage of ethnic communities – our community members can use this fund to make their ideas come alive, and we are all richer for it.”

NMF consists of two separate funds: Community Partnership Fund, which is offered three times a year with cash awards up to $100,000, and the Small Sparks Fund, which is offered on a rolling basis throughout the year with cash awards of up to $5,000. To make the program more accessible, several enhancements were introduced this year including a streamlined application, added flexibility, and faster review processes. The program improvements have already resulted in nearly half of the applications coming from first time applicant groups. The next CPF application deadlines are June 26 and September 25.

The Neighborhood Matching Fund (NMF) provides more than $3 million each year to local organizations. Over its 29-year history, more than 5,000 projects have been funded in partnership with the NMF Program, and its investment in neighborhoods can be seen across the city. For more information about NMF, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/nmf/.

2017 Community Partnership Fund Awards – Spring Cycle

Citywide (Across all Council Districts)

$95,400 to The Seattle Globalist to organize a series of 17 free media workshops to train diverse communities to identify and produce multimedia stories about issues facing international communities around Seattle. The stories will be featured on its website and at a public celebration this fall. (Community match: $53,760)

$100,000 to Seattle Repertory Theatre to engage all ages and backgrounds from eight neighborhoods to participate in one year of free theatre-based classes led by professional teaching artists. It will include a production of four performances featuring the participants. (Community match: $734,493)

$60,000 to Town Hall Seattle to facilitate Inside/Out Community-Created Events in four neighborhoods. Neighborhood committees will collaborate as co-creators to develop and produce three to five inclusive arts and civics events in their neighborhoods. (Community match: $100,900)

$50,000 to Center for Linguistic and Cultural Democracy to organize a series of workshops and events to celebrate the arts and culture of the Caribbean throughout summer 2017. (Community match: $46,440)

District 1

$100,000 to Friends of Highland Park Elementary to construct a new public entryway and new play features at the Highland Park Elementary School playground. (Community match: $129,400)

$28,300 to Friends of 5th and Cloverdale to engage the community and a landscape architecture consulting team in a design process for streetscape improvements at the intersection of 5th Ave S and S Cloverdale St. (Community match: $18,730)

$10,500 to The Community Outreach Challenge Steering Committee to host the Community Outreach Challenge, a three-day fitness challenge for youth, to promote teamwork and decision-making through fitness. (Community match: $10,940)

District 2

$30,400 to Rainier Beach Merchants Association to organize the Rainier Beach Music and Arts Fest (BAAMFest), a cultural festival held in July to celebrate Rainier Beach’s beautiful, vibrant community, cultural heritage, and highlight its business district. (Community match: $29,895)

$29,800 to Othello Park Alliance to organize the Othello Park International Music and Arts Festival in August which will include music, food, art, and dance for all ages and cultures. (Community match: $31,634)

$15,100 to Friends of Japantown and Beyond to develop a series of free community walks in Chinatown-International District this year. The walk route will include sites of historical, economic, and cultural significance to the Japanese American community. (Community match: $39,100)

$27,800 to Friends of Block Party at The Station to organize the 2017 Block Party at The Station, an annual music and arts festival which showcases South Seattle artists and small businesses. This year’s festival will spotlight marginalized communities with most festival performers being women and LGBTQ artists of color. (Community match: $18,568)

$34,000 to East African Arts & Cultural Association to organize events to celebrate Ethiopian Week in July. The events will bring together the Ethiopian community to practice their heritage, engage Ethiopian youth in relevant community issues, and strengthen mutual understanding and respect among various cultures. (Community match: $19,400)

$20,000 to Big-Brained Superheroes Club to facilitate mini workshops by the Big-Brained Superheroes of Yesler Terrace, youth ages 5-18, on science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM). (Community match: $23,500)

$21,200 to Soul Societies to provide art instruction and cultural exploration to approximately 50 youth as a part of Tales of Art Project. This project will provide a place for Vietnamese and East African youth to create and showcase their artwork with the hope of increasing intra-cultural awareness and appreciation. (Community match: $10,760)

$25,000 to Somali Community Services of Seattle to organize a series of theater and acting trainings for youth in South Seattle this summer followed by a public performance. This project will bring together community members from various racial and ethnic backgrounds to promote understanding and cohesion. (Community match: $14,000)

$30,000 to It Takes a Village to organize The Middle Passage Healing Project, a series of events designed to foster unity among African Americans and East Africans. Digital storytelling, dance, art, music, African proverbs, podcasts, social media and cultural recipes will be highlighted. (Community match: $42,800)

$30,000 to Fathers & Sons Together (FAST) to organize six outdoor activities and powerful lessons with the goal of empowering fathers and guardians to embrace the pivotal role they hold in the family structure and support them in mentoring their sons and male youth into manhood. (Community match: $21,400)

District 3

$99,000 to Eritrean Association of Greater Seattle to make physical improvements to the Eritrean Association Community Center to improve opportunities for community events and educational activities. (Community match: $49,500)

$30,000 to Garinagu Houngua to organize a series of music, language, history, and food workshops centered on cultural exchange between the Garifuna and Panamanian communities in Seattle.  (Community match: $35,273)

$24,000 to Ethiopian Women Mothers & Family to organize an all-day celebration at Powell Barnett Park of the achievements of Ethiopian women through arts and culture, speaker presentations, family entertainments, and role model awards. (Community match: $39,275)

District 4

$58,000 to Sand Point Arts and Cultural Exchange to install equipment to launch KMGP 101.1, a low power radio station, with the goal of connecting communities using arts and culture and providing equity over the airwaves. (Community match: $44,677)

District 5

$46,800 to Friends of Jane Addams Middle School to engage the community and a landscape architect to prepare conceptual landscape design drawings to improve outdoor usability and safety at Jane Addams Middle School. (Community match: $24,930)

$50,000 to Friends of Evanston P-Patch to renovate the Evanston P-Patch’s decaying infrastructure by building a new path, new fence, sheds, a greenhouse, and a community gathering space with input from gardeners and neighbors. (Community match: $49,600)

District 7

$18,100 to Discover Music in the Park to organize a free outdoor classical music and dance concert in Discovery Park this August. (Community match: $11,760)

$20,000 to Magnolia Chamber of Commerce to install “Discover Magnolia” street flags, host three art walks, and implement an art in empty storefronts program as part of the Visible Village Vitality effort. (Community match: $12,700)

$40,000 to STRUM Community Group to organize music programming and potluck events to bring together musicians from the city’s homeless population and neighbors who share an interest in making music and building community. (Community match: $50,000)

$65,000 to Sundiata African American Cultural Association to produce Festival Sundiata, June 10-11, the largest African American festival in the Northwest that celebrates the culture of people of African descent, through music, food, dance and artistic expression. (Community match: $52,660)

$24,000 to Friends of Sheridan Street End to collaborate with a design firm to prepare conceptual design and permitting for improvements that would provide greater public access and community amenities at the West Sheridan Street End. ($13,400)

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Feature Focus: How the Creative Advantage Engages Students at Seattle World School

Seattle World School (SWS) is one of several Seattle Public Schools to launch an arts plan through The Creative Advantage, a city-wide partnership to reinvest in equitable arts education for all students. Funding from these efforts allows SWS and other activated Creative Advantage schools to partner with local arts organizations like Spectrum Dance Theatre and Jack Straw Productions. Located in Capitol Hill, SWS is unique in that it primarily serves immigrant and English Language Learners (ELL) students. With over 20 languages and more than 30 countries represented at the school, students are not only learning subjects like math, science, history, and language arts, but are simultaneously learning English as their second, third, or fourth language.

So we wanted to find out: what role do the arts play in these students’ educational experiences? With the help of SWS music teacher Aimee Mell, we recently had the pleasure of visiting two choir classes and speaking directly to students about what arts programs mean to them.

Walter, an 18-year-old student at SWS, is involved in choir. “I like choir because I learn a lot of words and their pronunciations,” he told us. “It helps with my English, like understanding words in math class or understanding the meaning of a song.”

Walter has many goals for his future. First he wants to go to college, but after, he’s also interested in becoming a doctor, joining the Army, or trying out for the Seattle Sounders. The skills he’s gained from his arts classes, like becoming more fluent in English, may help him achieve those dreams.

And Walter isn’t the only student who feels the arts are benefitting him both in and out of school.

“I really like when I have to work with my hands, like drawing or sewing,” said Shirley, 16. She hopes to one day become an interior designer, and she knows that her arts classes are helping prepare her. “For example, when teachers ask me to do posters, they really appreciate my work and art skills,” she explained.

Music teacher Aimee Mell also believes the arts can help newly-emigrated students, like Walter and Shirley, transition to life in the United States.

“My goal is that when students newly arrive to the U.S. and at the World School, that they will walk into my music room and find something they can relate to, and that they will feel a little piece of home,” she told us. “Learning and living in a new language is daunting, and hopefully music is a place of fun, refuge, community and success.”

In addition to preparing students for success in life, arts classes at SWS provide creative opportunities for students to express themselves. Dona, 16, is involved in choir along with Shirley and Walter. “I really have a good time singing with friends, and even on stage,” he told us.

The arts have helped Dona gain the courage to take risks and try new experiences, like singing John Legend’s “If You’re Out There” at a choir concert or acting two different roles in the The Taming of the Shrew. “I like to try different things,” he said. “I like to sometimes do drama and sometimes music, and even art—though I don’t know how, but I’ll try.”

Arts classes have been an integral part of Dona’s education at SWS. When we asked how he would feel if he lost access to arts programs, he found it difficult to imagine. “I don’t know how I would enjoy my time without singing or acting,” he said.

Shirley feels the same. One of her best memories is from acting in a school production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. “When I did Midsummer Night’s Dream, I was the main character, so my grandma came from my home country, Guatemala,” she said. “I was pretty excited. She saw me in the play and she congratulated my teacher. That was the best play that I could do. And my dress was amazing, I really liked it.”

From sparking students’ creativity to helping them learn English, arts classes are a valuable part of the school day that should be accessible to all SPS students – a belief that The Creative Advantage is working towards making a reality.

Photo by Aimee Mell

Out to Lunch Summer Concert Series Returns to City Hall this Summer

The highly popular Out to Lunch Summer Concert Series is returning for its 38th year, bringing free, live music to Downtown employees, residents and visitors.

The Dip

Many of the Puget Sound’s most recognized bands, as well as up-and-comers are featured throughout the concert series. The concerts are a much-anticipated summertime attraction, which draw thousands of people each week. Performances will take place at City Hall Plaza and other various outdoor locations and parks throughout Downtown.

Join us every Thursday from noon to 1:30 p.m. this summer for our Out to Lunch Concert series at City Hall Plaza!

City Hall Plaza, 600 4th Ave. concert schedule:

Thurs, July 9
Seattle Women’s Jazz Orchestra Jazz Ensemble

Thurs, July 16
Bleachbear & COHO + Live Painter presented by Abbey Arts Indie Pop

Thurs, July 23
Austin Jenckes Country-Folk Singer/Songwriter

Thurs, July 30
Greta Matassa & Friends Jazz Vocalist

Thurs, Aug. 6
Naomi Wachira Afro-Folk Singer/Songwriter

Thur, Aug. 13
Vaudeville Etiquette Boot-Stomping Folk Rock

Thurs, Aug. 20
V. Contreras Alternative Soul

Thurs, Aug. 27
Industrial Revelation Garage-Jazz Quartet

Full Out To Lunch Concert schedule and a complete list of all Downtown events during the summer can be found here: http://www.downtownseattle.com/Summer/

Image courtesy Payton Bordley

Pianos in the Parks campaign launched July 17

Local musician Shenandoah Davis performs with Sean Nelson in Othello Park

On July 17, Seattle Parks and Recreation, King County Parks, Laird Norton Wealth Management, and local arts and business organizations collaborated to launch Pianos in the Parks. The Pianos in the Parks campaign placed 20 decorated pianos in Seattle parks, King County parks, Seattle Center and City Hall Plaza hoping to encourage residents to explore green and open spaces and to share and enjoy each others’ art.

“We are delighted to host the pianos at 13 city parks, Seattle Center and City Hall plaza,” Mayor Murray said. “Pianos in the Parks will enliven our parks and engage communities through the power of art and music.”

The first piano was unveiled Thursday, July 17 at an event in Othello Park. Other Seattle Parks locations for the pianos include Cal Anderson Park, Denny Park, Hing Hay Park, Ballard Commons Park, Green Lake Park, Alki Beach Park, Maple Leaf Reservoir Park, Pier 62/63, Sam Smith Park, Rainier Beach Plaza, Volunteer Park and Westlake Park.

“We are thrilled to host this positive and innovative way to bring more people into our parks and to listen to music for all to enjoy,” said Christopher Williams, Acting Superintendent of Seattle Parks and Recreation.

Other partners include Seattle Symphony, KEXP, Gage Academy of Art, City of Music and Classic Pianos.

The pianos were procured and donated by Classic Pianos and will be available in the parks until Aug. 17. Members of the public are invited to play the pianos and can upload videos of their park performances to the Pianos in the Parks Facebook page for a chance to play at KEXP’s and Seattle Center’s “Concerts at the Mural” on Friday, Aug. 22. The Facebook entries that receive the highest number of “likes” will be judged by a community panel and a winner will be selected.

At the end of the campaign, the pianos will be sold to the highest bidder in an online auction on www.pianosintheparks.com. Proceeds from the pianos sales will benefit Seattle Parks and Recreation, King County Parks, Seattle Symphony, KEXP and Gage Academy of Art.

For more information about Pianos in the Parks scheduled activities, participating parks/open spaces and full contest information, please visit: www.pianosintheparks.com. To tag contest entries, pictures and experiences, use the hashtag #PianosintheParks and send your photos to @seattleparks on Twitter.