Creating, Activating and Preserving Cultural Space

I am proud to present The CAP Report: 30 Ideas for the Creation, Activation, and Preservation of Cultural Space.

Seattle is a dynamic arts and culture center. With 800 independent arts and culture venues in the city where Seattle can dance, listen, see, think, and absorb the rich creativity that courses through the arts community and energizes the city at large, we are now nationally recognized as an arts leader.

Our breathtaking growth in recent years is a sign of that success, making it clear what a magnetic cultural hub we’ve become. However, our exponential growth has created challenges, including a serious strain on affordability. Ironically, the rising rents that have accompanied our success and growth, threaten the very cutting edge arts spaces and institutions that have made Seattle a dynamic destination city in the first place.

To address our housing affordability crisis, my unprecedented Housing Affordability and Livability (HALA) legislation requires developers to contribute to affordable housing whenever they build. By coupling growth and affordability with progressive public policy like HALA, we will grow as an inclusive and equitable city.

The arts are a vital component of the “Livability” in HALA’s policy mandate. Our mission to be an affordable, and therefore inclusive and equitable city, must emphasize the thriving arts culture that defines our community.

In 2014 I instructed various departments to work collaboratively with the Arts Office and to engage with the community to develop solutions to the root issues that confront us as a thriving cultural center. What you see here is the result of that work.

The ideas explored here to support Seattle’s invaluable arts community reflect a much broader commitment: Supporting Seattle’s arts is at its heart about supporting Seattle’s soul. And that means ensuring inclusion for the creative artists who make Seattle thrive.

We look forward to your support of this developing project, and to working with you to refine the ideas contained herein. Together we will build a more inclusive Seattle. We will build a more equitable Seattle. We will build a more resilient, more culturally rich, and more artistically vital Seattle. We will build the Seattle that Seattleites deserve.

 

Sincerely,

Edward B. Murray

Two Members Sought for Seattle’s Landmarks Preservation Board

Mayor Edward Murray is seeking two new members to serve on the Landmarks Preservation Board. The 12-member board reviews all landmark nominations, makes recommendations to Seattle City Council for designation of city landmarks, and reviews all proposed physical alterations to designated features of landmark properties.

The Landmarks Board is composed of two architects, two historians, one structural engineer, one representative each from the fields of real estate and finance, one member from the City Planning Commission, a Get Engaged member (for young adults ages 18-29), and three members at-large. These recent openings are for the Real Estate position and a Historian position. All appointments are made by the Mayor, subject to City Council confirmation.

Board meetings are held on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 3:30 p.m. The architect and historian board members also serve on the Board’s Architectural Review Committee (ARC). In general, board members must commit approximately 10 hours per month to Landmarks Board business.

Interested applicants must be Seattle residents, and board members serve without compensation. Those interested in being considered should send a letter of interest and resume by Tuesday, July 1, 2014. Electronic submissions are preferred, if possible.

Please email your letter and resume to:Erin.Doherty@seattle.gov

(reference the Landmarks Preservation Board in the subject line).

To submit a paper copy, address it to Erin Doherty, Landmark Preservation Board Coordinator, Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, P.O. Box 94649, Seattle, WA 98124-4649. For more information, call Erin at (206) 684-0380.

The city of Seattle is committed to promoting diversity in the city’s boards and commissions. Women, persons with disabilities, sexual and gender minorities, young persons, senior citizens, persons of color, and immigrants are encouraged to apply.

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Historic Preservation Program is responsible for the designation and protection of more than 400 historic structures, sites, objects, and vessels, as well as seven historic districts located throughout the city.

Two members Sought for Seattle’s Landmarks Preservation Board

Mayor Edward Murray is seeking two new members to serve on the Landmarks Preservation Board. The 12-member board reviews all landmark nominations, makes recommendations to Seattle City Council for designation of city landmarks, and reviews all proposed physical alterations to designated features of landmark properties. These recent openings are for the Real Estate position and a Historian position.

The Landmarks Board is composed of two architects, two historians, one structural engineer, one representative each from the fields of real estate and finance, one member from the City Planning Commission, a Get Engaged member (for young adults ages 18-29), and three members at-large. All appointments are made by the Mayor, subject to City Council confirmation.

Board meetings are held on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 3:30 p.m. The architect and historian board members also serve on the Board’s Architectural Review Committee (ARC). In general, board members must commit approximately 10 hours per month to Landmarks Board business.

Interested applicants must be Seattle residents, and board members serve without compensation. Those interested in being considered should send a letter of interest and resume by June 2, 2014. Electronic submissions are preferred, if possible.

Please email your letter and resume to: Erin.Doherty@seattle.gov

(reference the Landmarks Preservation Board in the subject line).

To submit a paper copy, address it to Erin Doherty, Landmark Preservation Board Coordinator, Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, P.O. Box 94649, Seattle, WA 98124-4649.

For more information, call Erin Doherty, Landmarks Preservation Board Coordinator, at (206) 684-0380.

The City of Seattle is committed to promoting diversity in the city’s boards and commissions. Women, persons with disabilities, sexual and gender minorities, young persons, senior citizens, persons of color, and immigrants are encouraged to apply.

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Historic Preservation Program is responsible for the designation and protection of more than 400 historic structures, sites, objects, and vessels, as well as seven historic districts located throughout the city.