Neighbors Invited to Help Plan Georgetown Find It, Fix It Community Walk

The Georgetown community is invited to help plan the Georgetown Find It, Fix It Community Walk, the fifth of seven Mayor-led walks happening this year. Find It, Fix It Community Walks bring together City officials, business owners, and community members to address neighborhood needs.

The Georgetown walk will be held on Wednesday, September 28 from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m and will follow a route determined by community members serving on its Community Walk Action Team.

If you are interested in serving on this team, contact Find It, Fix It Program Coordinator Laura Jenkins at laura.jenkins@seattle.gov or 206.233.5166.

In addition, Georgetown community members are invited to apply for up to $5000 to complete community projects that improve the safety or appearance of their neighborhood. To apply for a Georgetown Community Project Grant, community members can find the application at seattle.gov/finditfixit beginning Thursday, September 22 through Friday, October 7.

Lastly, community members don’t have to wait for the walk to report safety needs or city maintenance issues. They can use the Find It, Fix It mobile app. Android users can download the app from the Google Play Store and iPhone users can download it from the App Store.

Judkins Park Neighbors Invited to Help Plan Find It, Fix It Community Walk

Roxhill / Westwood Neighborhood Walk – July 2016

Judkins Park neighbors are invited to help plan the Judkins Park Find It, Fix It Community Walk, the fourth of seven Mayor-led walks happening this year. Find It, Fix It Community Walks bring together City officials, business owners, and community members to address neighborhood needs.

The Judkins Park walk will be held on Wednesday, August 24 from 6:00 – 7:30pm and will follow a route determined by community members serving on its Community Walk Action Team. If you are interested in serving on this team, contact Find It, Fix It Program Coordinator Laura Jenkins at laura.jenkins@seattle.gov or 206.233.5166.

Judkins Park community members are also invited to apply for up to $5,000 to complete community projects that improve the safety or appearance of their neighborhood. To apply for a Community Project Grant, community members can find the application at seattle.gov/finditfixit beginning Monday, August 15 through Wednesday, August 31.

Lastly, community members don’t have to wait for the walk to report safety needs or city maintenance issues. They can use the Find It, Fix It mobile app. Android users can download the app from the Google Play Store and iPhone users can download it from the App Store.

City of Seattle Now Accepting Applications for Seattle Youth Commission

The City of Seattle is now accepting applications for the Seattle Youth Commission (SYC), a commission of 15 Seattle residents ages 13-19 that address issues of importance to youth. Appointed by the Mayor and Seattle City Council, youth serving on this commission get a unique opportunity to work with elected officials, city staff, community leaders, and young people citywide to make positive changes in their communities through policy, organizing, and events. The deadline to apply is Friday, August 5 at 5:00 p.m.

Youth serving on the commission will be required to attend a half-day retreat on Saturday, September 24, bi-monthly SYC meetings, and additional committee commitments.  The commission meets the 2nd and 4th Wednesdays of each month at Seattle City Hall from 4:00 – 6:00 p.m. Commissioners will serve a two-year term beginning in September 2016 and ending June 2018.

In addition to representing youth across the city, commissioners receive hands-on experience in the public sector and learn how to cultivate the youth voice in city policy.

“Participating in the Seattle Youth Council was integral to my secondary education. It sparked a fire in me for community engagement and continues to impact my career aspirations.” – Lily Clifton, SYC member (2008-2010)

To apply, visit www.seattle.gov/seattle-youth-commission or print and complete this application and mail to:

Jenny Frankl
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
PO Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124-4649

Completed paper applications can also be turned in at the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods office in Seattle City Hall (600 4th Avenue) on the 4th floor.

For questions, contact jenny.frankl@seattle.gov or call 206-233-2044.

Neighbors Invited to Roxhill/Westwood Find It, Fix It Community Walk

Please join Mayor Murray and city leaders on Monday, July 25 in the Roxhill/Westwood neighborhood for our third Find It, Fix It Community Walk. These walks provide a unique opportunity for community members to identify neighborhood needs and discuss challenges directly with City leadership.

 

Roxhill/Westwood Find It, Fix It Community Walk
Monday, July 25, 2016
Sign-in and refreshments provided by Starbucks from 6:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Program and walk from 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Meet at the Longfellow Creek P-Patch at SW Thistle St & 25th Ave SW

Schedule
6:00 p.m. – 6:30p.m.

  • Sign-in and refreshments at the Longfellow Creek P-Patch

6:30 p.m. – 6:45 p.m.

  • Welcome remarks from Mayor Ed Murray

6:45 p.m. – 7:55 p.m.

7:55pm – 8:00 p.m.

  • Walk concludes at Roxhill Park
  • Department representatives and City staff available for follow-up questions

 

In partnership with Cities of Service, the City will offer up to $5,000 in grants for community-led projects to each 2016 Find It, Fix It Walk neighborhood. The Roxhill/Westwood Community Project Grant Application is available in seven languages at www.seattle.gov/finditfixit until Wednesday, August 3. If you have an idea for a project in Roxhill/Westwood, please apply today!

Participants can also use the Find It, Fix It mobile app on the walk. This smartphone app offers mobile users one more way to report selected issues to the City. Make sure to download the app before the walk.

For more information on the Find It, Fix It Community Walks program, please contact Laura Jenkins at 206.233.5166 or laura.jenkins@seattle.gov or visit www.seattle.gov/finditfixit.

New Community Engagement Plan will Bring More Diverse Neighborhood Voices Before the City

Mayor Ed Murray has signed an executive order to bring greater equity to the City’s outdated system for promoting public engagement among residents of Seattle’s neighborhoods.

“Our city has changed dramatically since our District Councils system was created three decades ago, and we have seen them over time become less and less representative not only of their neighborhoods but of Seattle itself,” said Murray. “For immigrants and refugees, low-income residents, communities of color, renters, single parents, youth, people experiencing homelessness, LGBTQ, and more, the system today has become a barrier for many to become involved in the City’s decision-making process. Now is the time to recreate our outreach and engagement process to become more accessible and inclusive, and to account for the ways that people communicate and connect in the 21st century.”

The District Council system, established in 1987, includes thirteen area-based councils whose membership includes local residents representing their neighborhood’s community council, business associations, and nonprofit organizations. In 2009, the City Auditor issued a strongly-worded report advocating for a reset of the District Council system, due in part to the low-level of diverse representation on the district councils.

In 2013, a demographic snapshot of District Council attendees showed that they tend to be 40 years of age or older, Caucasian, with the vast majority owning their homes. At least six District Councils had no reported people of color attending, and only three District Councils reported any African American attendees.

Murray’s executive order directs City departments to begin developing robust community engagement plans, and takes steps toward dissolving the City’s ties to each of the thirteen district councils. The district councils may still exist, but Department of Neighborhoods’ resources that previously supported the district councils will be redirected to support all City departments in these efforts. Throughout the month of August, the Department of Neighborhoods will conduct civic engagement focus groups. By September 26, the department will also draft legislation for a new citywide community engagement framework and strategic plan, including a new Seattle Community Involvement Commission to be established by January 2017. The Department of Neighborhoods and Seattle IT are also directed to submit a digital engagement plan by March 1, 2017 to broaden public accessibility.

“How we reach out to residents to bring them into the governing process reflects the City’s fundamental commitment to equity and to democracy,” said Murray. “We’re constantly looking to bring down barriers, to open up more opportunities, and to reflect the face of our diverse and growing city. I know that community members have committed untold hours serving on the district councils over the years: this change is about distributing opportunity for community input, not taking it away.”

To learn more about the Mayor’s executive order, go to our Advancing Equitable Outreach and Engagement webpage.