Aurora-Licton Find It, Fix It Community Walk

Mayor Murray’s Find It, Fix It Community Walks provide a unique opportunity for community members to identify neighborhood needs and discuss challenges directly with City leaders. Our first walk of the year will be held in the Aurora-Licton neighborhood on Tuesday, May 31 beginning at 6:00 p.m. Refreshments will be provided.

Aurora-Licton Find It, Fix It Community Walk
Tuesday, May 31, 2016, 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Meet at the Oak Tree Village Shopping Center by the AMC Loews Oak Tree 6 (Between N 100 St. and N 103 St. on Aurora Ave N.)

Schedule
6:00 p.m. – 6:20 p.m.

  • Welcome remarks from Mayor Ed Murray
  • Find It, Fix It Mobile App tutorial

6:20 p.m. – 7:15 p.m.

  • Walk commences along the following route (map):
    • East on N 100th St.
    • South on  Ashworth Ave. N
    • South on Stone Ave. N
    • West on N 90th St.
    • North on Aurora Ave. N

7:15pm – 7:30 p.m. 

  • Walk concludes at Lantern Brewing on N 95th St.
  • Department representatives and City staff available for follow-up questions

In partnership with Cities of Service, the City will offer up to $5,000 in grants for community-led projects to each 2016 Find It, Fix It Walk neighborhood. The Aurora-Licton Community Project Grant Application is available on May 25 at www.seattle.gov/finditfixit until Friday, June 10. If you have an idea for a project in Aurora-Licton, please apply today!

Seeking Volunteers for North Seattle College Standing Advisory Committee

North Seattle College Health Sciences and Student Resources Building

Do you live in North Seattle and have an interest in serving on a committee that advises on the development plans of the North Seattle College?

Our Major Institutions and Schools Program, which provides a way for neighbors of Seattle’s hospitals, universities, and colleges to be directly involved in the development plans for those institutions, is currently seeking interested community members to participate on the North Seattle College Standing Advisory Committee.

This committee provides feedback on projects planned and under development by the college to ensure it complies with its Master Plan. The Master Plan describes zoning rules, long range planning of the property, and transportation planning.

If you live in North Seattle and have experience in neighborhood organizing and issues, land use and zoning, architecture or landscape architecture, economic development, building development, educational services, or just an interest in your neighborhood’s future, we highly encourage you to apply.

The committee meets at North Seattle College one to four times a year. Committee members serve a two-year renewable term. If you are interested in serving on this committee, send a letter of interest via e-mail or regular mail by Tuesday, May 31 to Maureen Sheehan at:

E-mail: Maureen.Sheehan@seattle.gov

Mailing Address:
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
P.O. Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124-4649

For more information contact Maureen Sheehan, Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, at 206-684-0302.

 

The City of Seattle is committed to promoting diversity in its boards and committees; women, young adults, senior citizens, persons with disabilities, sexual and gender minorities, persons of color, and immigrants are highly encouraged to apply.

 

Neighbors Invited to Help Plan Aurora-Licton Find It, Fix It Community Walk

The Aurora-Licton community is invited to help plan the Aurora-Licton Find It, Fix It Community Walk, the first of seven Mayor-led walks happening this year. During these walks, neighbors, police, and City officials walk together to identify physical elements in the neighborhood that make it feel unsafe or poorly maintained. Examples include overgrown trees, graffiti, street light outages, and litter. Once the elements are identified, the City and community work together to fix the problems.

The Aurora-Licton walk will be held on Tuesday, May 31 from 6 – 7:30 p.m and will be centered on the area around Aurora Avenue N between N. 84th and 110th Streets and will follow a route determined by community members serving on its Community Walk Action Team. If you are interested in serving on this team, contact Find It, Fix It Program Coordinator Hilary Nichols at hilary.nichols@seattle.gov or 206.386.1907.

In addition, Aurora-Licton residents are invited to apply for up to $5000 to complete community projects that improve the safety or appearance of their neighborhood. To apply for the Aurora-Licton Community Project Grants, community members can find the application at seattle.gov/finditfixit beginning Wednesday, May 25 through Friday, June 10.

Lastly, community members don’t have to wait for the walk to report safety needs or city maintenance issues. They can use the Find It, Fix It mobile app:

Community invited to provide input on new play equipment at Licton Springs Park

Seattle Parks and Recreation invites the community to provide input on new play equipment for the Licton Springs Park play area. Please join Seattle Parks and Recreation’s Planner and Sr. Landscape Architect on Sat., April 30, 2016 from 10:30 a.m. to noon at the park, 9536 Ashworth Ave N.

This meeting is an opportunity to learn about the improvement project and provide community input. The project will replace the play equipment, provide access improvements and improve other features at the park.

The Seattle Park District provides the funding for this play area renovation. Approved by voters in 2014, the Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously acquired sites. 2016 is the first full year of implementation and will include funding to tackle the $267-million major maintenance backlog; and will fund the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of the urban forest; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land.

For more information about the project please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/licton_springs/

If you have additional questions about the project or would like to request accommodations or need an interpreter please contact Karimah Edwards at Karimah.edwards@seattle.gov or 206-233-0063.

Deadline Approaches for Matching Funds to Support your Neighborhood Project

September 2 workshop for interested applicants
Application deadline is October 5

If your group needs funds to do a neighborhood project, our Neighborhood Matching Fund may be able to help. However, you’ll need to be quick because the application deadline for the Small and Simple Projects Fund is Monday, October 5 at 5:00 p.m. This fund provides awards of up to $25,000 to for community-building projects that are matched by community contributions.

To learn about the Small and Simple Projects Fund, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/nmf/smallandsimple.htm. This is the last opportunity in 2015 to apply to this fund.

The final workshop is scheduled for Wednesday, September 2 from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. at University Heights Community Center (Room 209), 5031 University Way NE. The workshop provides an overview of the Neighborhood Matching Fund, the qualities of a good project, and the application process and requirements. To RSVP, go online at surveymonkey.com/r/ZHM36BJ or call  206-233-0093. The workshop is open to all.

Our Neighborhood Matching Fund staff is available to advise groups on ways to develop successful applications and projects. You are strongly encouraged to call 206.233.0093 or email NMFund@seattle.gov to discuss your project idea with one of our project managers.

The Neighborhood Matching Fund (NMF) Program awards matching funds for projects initiated, planned, and implemented by community members. Its goal is to build stronger and healthier neighborhoods through community involvement and engagement. Every award is matched by a neighborhood’s contribution of volunteer labor, donated materials, in-kind professional services, or cash.