Seattle City Light Welcomes New Homeowners

As a home-warming gift, Seattle City Light is excited to start sending Welcome Brochures to help new home owners in the area get know their new utility.

The brochures have important information about City Light, useful contact numbers, and energy conservation resources. It also features special coupons for a free energy-saving LED light bulb, a discount on Skagit tours, a free shower timer, and a free LED selector tool.

If you’re a new home owner, be on the lookout for your Welcome Brochure coming to your mailbox soon.

Nicole Schultz from City Light’s marketing team proudly holds the recently redone residential Welcome Brochures

City Light Continues Arterial LED Streetlight Installations

Seattle City Light is continuing to improve customer safety, reduce carbon emissions and conserve resources by converting streetlights on arterial roadways from high-pressure sodium (HPS) lights to energy-efficient LEDs. The new LED lights will make arterial streets safer by increasing visibility at night.

City Light installed about 40,000 LED streetlights throughout residential neighborhoods in the utility’s service territory. The utility’s work is now focused on converting the remaining arterial streetlights to LED fixtures. By the end of 2015, the utility expects to convert about 12,000 HPS lights to LED fixtures and save about 9 million kilowatt-hours of electricity per year – enough energy to power more than 1,000 homes for a year. It will also save over $1.8 million dollars for the City of Seattle and the utility’s suburban franchise cities.

 

The City of Seattle sets regulations based on national standards for how much light should be provided on roadways to maintain safe driving conditions and ensure pedestrian safety. City Light has a responsibility to follow those standards. As a result, arterial classified roadways require a higher wattage LED than residential street lighting.

 

Arterial conversion work began in late March 2015. City Light’s contractor, Potelco, is working on Seattle’s arterial roadways between Denny Way and 65th Street. Working hours are 6:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Tuesdays through Fridays. Minimal traffic and parking impacts are expected in the immediate work area. Depending on the progress, this phase of work may extend north to 145th Street. See the included map for more details. It is expected that all City of Seattle arterial roadways will be completed within two to three years.

For more information about this project, please visit http://www.seattle.gov/light/streetlight/led/.

 

Seattle City Light is the 10th largest public electric utility in the United States. It has some of the lowest cost customer rates of any urban utility, providing reliable, renewable and environmentally responsible power to about 750,000 Seattle area residents. City Light has been greenhouse gas neutral since 2005, the first electric utility in the nation to achieve that distinction.

Arterial conversion work will cover Seattle’s arterial roadways between Denny Way and 65th Street (highlighted in red). Depending on progress, this phase of work may extend north to 145th Street (highlighted in green).

 

Amtrak cuts its costs with LED lighting, support from Seattle City Light

Some of the new energy efficient LED lighting at Amtrak’s Seattle yard.

At Amtrak’s Seattle yard, the lights shine a little brighter and the power bill is a lot smaller thanks to energy-efficient strategies created through collaboration between the railroad and Seattle City Light.

Last fall, Amtrak retrofitted 508 light fixtures with LED and T8 fluorescent lights, replacing high-intensity discharge lamps and T12 fluorescent fixtures. The new lights shine brighter, increasing line of sight and security. LEDs also last four times longer and offer efficient dimming capabilities. This project saves about 1 million kilowatt-hours of electricity per year — enough energy to power more than 100 homes for a year.

“These lights will help reduce our overall operating and maintenance costs,” Amtrak Project Manager 1 Dan Radeke said. “They should last a long time.”

LED lights were installed at Amtrak’s warehouse A, the material control warehouse, the maintenance of equipment building, exterior lighting and the commissary.

Timers and light motion detectors, which keep lights off until people are present, also were installed. Existing compressed air lines were repaired and an energy-reducing air compressor was purchased.

The total cost of the project was $544,000. Seattle City light provided $312,000 in energy efficiency incentives for the project.

Amtrak Manager of Energy Projects John Tull introduced Radeke to Seattle City Lights’ rebate program, recognizing it could save money and reduce energy bills. Tull also identified the type of lights needed through research and conversations with City Light Senior Energy Management Analyst Aaron Houseknecht.

“The buildings are fairly new, only 4 years old, and they used efficient lighting,” Houseknecht said.  “What I noticed the most was that all the lights were on and there was no one around.  Conservation performed an occupancy study and found that some areas were 90 percent vacant.”

“A lighting contractor was going to replace the lamps and ballasts in this building as routine maintenance so I suggested that they attach an occupancy sensor to the lights when doing the retrofit,” he said. “There was so much energy savings and incentives that Amtrak decided to install the occupancy sensors and to convert the lights to LEDs.  We also looked at an air compressor that ran continuously to feed leaky underground pipes.  You could literally see air bubbles in the mud puddles.  We replaced the compressor and added new piping and now the compressor only runs for a few hours a day.

Amtrak is already seeing the benefits of the changes.

Amtrak Deputy General Manager Kurt Laird helped find funding to pay for the initial cost of the LED lights before the rebate became effective.

“We wanted to conserve energy and create a better environment for our employees,” Laird said. “We accomplished our goals, and we want to keep moving forward.”

Operation LED Sends 100,000th Free LED Bulb to Mount Baker Couple

Congratulations to Rory and Kathy L. from the Mount Baker neighborhood of Seattle. They are the recipients of the 100,000th free LED light bulb distributed by our Operation LED.

“I have seen the light in the night and it is right!” Rory said when told of the milestone.

Rory and Kathy are being invited to a Seattle Mariners game to be recognized on the field for their participation.

If you’re a City Light customer, you can get a free bulb too. Visit seattle.gov/freebulb and enter your City Light account number. Online instructions are available in Spanish, Korean, Chinese, Tagalog, Vietnamese and Somali in addition to English. Follow the instructions on a mailer being sent to all City Light customers with a unique code. Or call 877-606-1599 and talk with a live person to request one.

Our goal is to give all our 370,000 residential households a free LED to introduce customers to these energy efficient lights and help them save money. Energy conservation is our first resource of choice to meet the electricity needs of our growing community.

While many LEDs look different than a traditional Edison-shaped bulb, they offer significant advantages:

  • They are more efficient than even compact fluorescent light bulbs
  • They last up to 25 years
  • They start up quicker
  • And they are compatible with most dimmers.

City Light expects the campaign to generate about 3.9 million kilowatt-hours of energy savings in the first year. That’s enough electricity to power 458 Seattle homes for a year.

Seattle City Light is the 10th largest public electric utility in the United States. It has some of the lowest cost customer rates of any urban utility, providing reliable, renewable and environmentally responsible power to about 750,000 Seattle area residents. City Light has been greenhouse gas neutral since 2005, the first electric utility in the nation to achieve that distinction.

 

Small WA Cities Get Big Help from State to Convert Streetlights to LEDs

Small cities in Washington are getting big help from the state to convert their streetlights from high-pressure sodium lamps to LEDs.

The Washington State Transportation Improvement Board announced recently that it has arranged directly with utility companies to convert to LED streetlights for eligible cities throughout the Puget Sound Energy and Avista Utilities service areas.  Work will begin as soon as July 2015 and continue for six years.  Cities with LED streetlights will pay new lower LED streetlight rates, saving at least 25 percent of monthly operating costs.  Agencies outside of these service providers will be able to receive direct grants beginning in 2016.

Seattle City Light collaborated with the board as it developed the program, sharing the utility’s experience on fixture specifications and performance.

City Light converted about 41,000 residential streetlights to LEDs and is now working to replace high-pressure sodium streetlights on arterial streets with energy efficient LEDs. Read more about that program here. The utility also led the US Department of Energy’s Municipal Solid State Street Lighting Consortium for four years, encouraging communities across the country to share information about LED streetlights and to speed installation of the energy saving lights.

Here’s the Washington State Transportation Improvement Board’s announcement of its new program, called Relight Washington:

Relight Washington LED Streetlight Program coming to small cities beginning in 2015

TIB introduced a new program in 2015 to move small cities to the front of the line in cost saving LED streetlight replacement. Small cities and cities with low tax base, including all cities with population under 5,000, will be eligible for LED streetlight conversion.  TIB intends to help cities take advantage of the up to 55 percent savings experienced with LED technology.

WHO IS ELIGIBLE?

All small cities (population under 5,000) will be eligible to receive funds.  Additionally the board has included urban agencies (population 5,000 and up) that have an assessed value under $2 billion.  Cities, including those over $2 billion assessed value, may also apply for funding from the Washington State Department of Commerce, subject to state budget adoption.

WHAT IS ELIGIBLE?

Streetlights on public streets within the city limits are eligible if the city pays for them directly or through utility rates.  Small numbers of new additional lights and directly related minor upgrades may be authorized by TIB.

HOW WILL THE PROGRAM WORK?

TIB has arranged directly with utility companies to convert to LED streetlights for eligible cities throughout the Puget Sound Energy and Avista Utilities service areas.  Work will begin as soon as July 2015 and continue for six years.  Cities with LED streetlights will pay new lower LED streetlight rates, saving at least 25 percent of monthly operating costs.  Agencies outside of these service providers will be able to receive direct grants beginning in 2016.

WHAT SHOULD AGENCIES BE DOING?

If your city is in the PSE or Avista service areas, no action is required.  You will receive funding authorization from TIB based on our coordinated scheduling with the utility.  Cities outside the Avista and PSE service areas may wish to prepare for future grant opportunities by inventorying light type, wattage and location.  Contact your utility company to ensure that significant cost savings will be shared with the city after installation.  TIB will not fund conversion in cases where no cost savings is shared with the city through lower rates.

WHAT IS NEXT?

TIB will start the first installations of streetlights this summer in the investor owned service areas where agreements are in place.

RELIGHT WASHINGTON ELIGIBLE AGENCIES

AberdeenAirway HeightsAlbion

Algona

Almira

Arlington

Asotin

Battle Ground

Beaux Arts Village

Benton City

Bingen

Black Diamond

Blaine

Bonney Lake

Brewster

Bridgeport

Brier

Buckley

Bucoda

Burlington

Carbonado

Carnation

Cashmere

Castle Rock

Cathlamet

Centralia

Chehalis

Chelan

Cheney

Chewelah

Clarkston

Cle Elum

Clyde Hill

Colfax

College Place

Colton

Colville

Conconully

Concrete

Connell

Cosmopolis

Coulee City

Coulee Dam

Coupeville

Covington

Creston

CusickDarringtonDavenport

Dayton

Deer Park

Dupont

Duvall

East Wenatchee

Eatonville

Edgewood

Electric City

Ellensburg

Elma

Elmer City

Endicott

Entiat

Enumclaw

Ephrata

Everson

Fairfield

Farmington

Ferndale

Fife

Fircrest

Forks

Friday Harbor

Garfield

George

Gig Harbor

Gold Bar

Goldendale

Grand Coulee

Grandview

Granger

Granite Falls

Hamilton

Harrah

Harrington

Hartline

Hatton

Hoquiam

Hunts Point

Ilwaco

Index

Ione

Kahlotus

KalamaKelsoKettle Falls

Kittitas

Krupp

La Center

La Conner

Lacrosse

Lake Forest Park

Lamont

Langley

Latah

Leavenworth

Liberty Lake

Lind

Long Beach

Lyman

Lynden

Mabton

Malden

Mansfield

Marcus

Mattawa

Mccleary

Medical Lake

Medina

Mesa

Metaline

Metaline Falls

Millwood

Milton

Monroe

Montesano

Morton

Mossyrock

Mountlake Terrace

Moxee

Naches

Napavine

Nespelem

Newcastle

Newport

Nooksack

Normandy Park

North Bend

North Bonneville

NorthportOak HarborOakesdale

Oakville

Ocean Shores

Odessa

Okanogan

Omak

Oroville

Orting

Othello

Pacific

Palouse

Pateros

Pe Ell

Pomeroy

Port Angeles

Port Orchard

Port Townsend

Poulsbo

Prescott

Prosser

Pullman

Quincy

Rainier

Raymond

Reardan

Republic

Ridgefield

Ritzville

Riverside

Rock Island

Rockford

Rosalia

Roslyn

Roy

Royal City

Ruston

Sedro Woolley

Selah

Sequim

Shelton

Skykomish

Snohomish

Snoqualmie

Soap Lake

South BendSouth Cle ElumSouth Prairie

Spangle

Sprague

Springdale

St. John

Stanwood

Starbuck

Steilacoom

Stevenson

Sultan

Sumas

Sumner

Sunnyside

Tekoa

Tenino

Tieton

Toledo

Tonasket

Toppenish

Twisp

Union Gap

Uniontown

Vader

Waitsburg

Wapato

Warden

Washougal

Washtucna

Waterville

Waverly

West Richland

Westport

White Salmon

Wilbur

Wilkeson

Wilson Creek

Winlock

Winthrop

Woodland

Woodway

Yacolt

Yarrow Point

Yelm

Zillah