City Light Continues Arterial LED Streetlight Installations

Seattle City Light is continuing to improve customer safety, reduce carbon emissions and conserve resources by converting streetlights on arterial roadways from high-pressure sodium (HPS) lights to energy-efficient LEDs. The new LED lights will make arterial streets safer by increasing visibility at night.

City Light installed about 40,000 LED streetlights throughout residential neighborhoods in the utility’s service territory. The utility’s work is now focused on converting the remaining arterial streetlights to LED fixtures. By the end of 2015, the utility expects to convert about 12,000 HPS lights to LED fixtures and save about 9 million kilowatt-hours of electricity per year – enough energy to power more than 1,000 homes for a year. It will also save over $1.8 million dollars for the City of Seattle and the utility’s suburban franchise cities.

 

The City of Seattle sets regulations based on national standards for how much light should be provided on roadways to maintain safe driving conditions and ensure pedestrian safety. City Light has a responsibility to follow those standards. As a result, arterial classified roadways require a higher wattage LED than residential street lighting.

 

Arterial conversion work began in late March 2015. City Light’s contractor, Potelco, is working on Seattle’s arterial roadways between Denny Way and 65th Street. Working hours are 6:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Tuesdays through Fridays. Minimal traffic and parking impacts are expected in the immediate work area. Depending on the progress, this phase of work may extend north to 145th Street. See the included map for more details. It is expected that all City of Seattle arterial roadways will be completed within two to three years.

For more information about this project, please visit http://www.seattle.gov/light/streetlight/led/.

 

Seattle City Light is the 10th largest public electric utility in the United States. It has some of the lowest cost customer rates of any urban utility, providing reliable, renewable and environmentally responsible power to about 750,000 Seattle area residents. City Light has been greenhouse gas neutral since 2005, the first electric utility in the nation to achieve that distinction.

Arterial conversion work will cover Seattle’s arterial roadways between Denny Way and 65th Street (highlighted in red). Depending on progress, this phase of work may extend north to 145th Street (highlighted in green).

 

Edward Smalley Named Manager for Seattle City Light Conservation Resources Division

Edward Smalley

Seattle City Light recently announced the selection of Edward Smalley as manager of the customer-facing teams for its Conservation Resources Division. In his new role, Smalley will manage the strategic and collaborative direction of the Energy Advisor group, the Residential Conservation Implementation team and the Lighting Design Lab.

“All of the folks in Conservation Resources and at the Lighting Design Lab do incredible work in lighting and energy conservation,” Smalley said. “The opportunities to build upon that work are seemingly endless, and I’m excited to be more directly involved with that effort. Beyond my initial goal of developing a strong, collaborative team, I want to ensure each member has the strategic support, both inside and outside of the utility, to meet the dynamic needs of our customers.”

Smalley worked as City Light’s street lighting engineering manager, establishing the unit and developing the utility’s planned maintenance and LED street lighting programs. Most recently, he served as director of the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium, a position appointed by the U.S. Department of Energy with support from the City of Seattle and City Light. During his time with the consortium, Smalley oversaw the planning and implementation of the city’s energy efficient streetlight conversion. Seattle was one of the first major U.S. cities to adapt to residential LED street lighting under his advocacy and leadership.

“We are so pleased to have a strategic partner like Edward as we grow our visibility in the market, expand services, and really bring a much higher-level of collaboration between Lighting Design Lab, Seattle City Light and the Lab’s other funding partners. The timing couldn’t have been better,” said Kurt Nielsen, Manager of the Lighting Design Lab.

Smalley began his new position on April 1.

Seattle City Light is the 10th largest public electric utility in the United States. It has some of the lowest cost customer rates of any urban utility, providing reliable, renewable and environmentally responsible power to nearly 1 million Seattle area residents. City Light has been greenhouse gas neutral since 2005, the first electric utility in the nation to achieve that distinction.

The Lighting Design Lab is a commercial lighting not-for-profit education facility funded by major Northwest electric utilities and conservation partners, including Seattle City Light. Celebrating its 25th anniversary, the lab provides consultation, demonstration and educational services to the engineering, lighting designer, and architectural communities. The lab’s mission is to transform the lighting market and build advocacy for conservation through the promotion and education of energy efficient technologies and design options in commercial and industrial retrofit applications and new construction. For more information about the Lighting Design Lab visit them online here.