Advanced Metering Utility Pole Upgrades Planned for February 2017

In February 2017, Seattle City Light will continue supporting Advanced Metering services throughout the utility’s service territory by replacing existing utility poles with taller poles, which will host wireless utility data collection equipment. The new poles will be 70 feet tall, which is about 20 feet taller than the existing poles.

Rendering of wireless utility data equipment on a utility pole.

This project is part of the communications network to support Advanced Metering, which will automate meter reading and enable enhanced services.

Throughout the month of February, City Light crews will be replacing poles in the following areas:

  • Lake City / North Seattle (NE 125th Street)
  • South Lake Union (Pontius Avenue N)
  • Othello Park (43rd Avenue S)
  • West Seattle / Junction (SW Edmunds Street)

View the February 2017 Utility Pole Upgrade maps for approximate construction work areas. Additional maps will be added on the Utility Pole Upgrade website as the project progresses into other areas within City Light’s service territory.

There are no maintenance power outages planned for this work. Some traffic and parking impacts are expected in the immediate work areas. Crews will be careful to maintain access to driveways.

Daily work hours are from Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. In most instances, the work to transfer existing equipment and install the data collection equipment can be completed in one day.

Customers can contact JoAnna Perley, Advanced Metering Deployment Manager at (206) 733-9648 or JoAnna.Perley@seattle.gov.


Visit the following websites for more information:

Seattle City Light’s “At Work in Your Neighborhood” website
www.seattle.gov/light/atwork

Seattle City Light’s Advanced Metering Program website
www.seattle.gov/light/meters

Artist Elizabeth Gahan selected to create public artwork for new Lake City Park

The Office of Arts & Culture (ARTS), in partnership with Seattle Parks and Recreation, has selected Seattle artist Elizabeth Gahan to create a permanent, site-specific artwork for a new park in Seattle’s Lake City Neighborhood.

The new neighborhood park located at 12510 33rd Ave NE, previously housed an office building that was purchased in 2010 as part of the Green Spaces Levy, and demolished early 2016. The park will serve Lake City’s growing population with much needed green space and provide a safe place to play, exercise and enjoy. Seattle Parks and Recreation has worked over the past year to gather community input into the overall design of this ¼ acre park.

Gahan will work closely with the design team to integrate artistic elements within the new park. Her artwork will consider the park location and conversations with the Lake City community will inform her work to create an interactive space that engages diverse audiences. Community conversations and design work will occur in early 2017, with the construction scheduled to start in late 2017/early 2018. “Elizabeth’s work will bring a positive energy to this area,” said community representative Cheryl Klinker. “This new park will offer a variety of activities to Lake City, and we think the color and style of her work will be an excellent fit to the neighborhood.”

Gahan is a Seattle-based artist. She received a dual undergraduate degree in Global Studies and Fine Art from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Master’s degree in Fine Art from Claremont Graduate University in Claremont, CA with an emphasis in painting. Her current artwork considers relationships between natural and built environments as well as local community and global connectivity. Having completed numerous temporary commissions including Seattle Center’s Poetry Art Garden Series in 2016, Gahan has also recently been awarded commissions for new permanent artwork for the City of Spokane as well as a Washington State Arts Commission project at Washington Elementary School in Wenatchee, WA.

The artwork is being funded through Seattle Parks and Recreation.

Photo: ELIZABETH GAHAN, Urban Flora, 2014. 20′ x 4′ x 4′, Corrugated plastic ads, spray paint & wire

Description: Colorful corrugated plastic is manipulated to take on an organic form existing symbiotically with the host tree. Yet, the use of synthetic materials and ads points to a broader conversation of the impact of urban growth and consumer culture on the natural environment. 

 

Seattle Parks and Recreation invites input on design of new Lake City park

Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR) invites the Lake City community to an Open House on Thurs., Sept. 29, 2016 to provide input on the design of a new park in Lake City. Join SPR planner and ELM Environment’s designers from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 12501 28th Ave. NE, just north of the Lake City branch library or from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Lake City Farmer’s Market to learn about the new park and provide design input. Lake City families, neighbors, friends and supporters are encouraged to attend.

SPR purchased the property located at 12510 33rd Ave. NE in 2010 to provide additional open space for the Lake City community. The events on Thurs., Sept. 29 are an opportunity for the community to participate in the design and meet the design team.

Funding for this park project is provided by Seattle Park District. Approved by voters in 2014, this is the first full year of implementation. The Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding to tackle the $267-million major maintenance backlog for Seattle Parks and Recreation. In addition, it will improve and rehabilitate community centers, preserve the urban forest, perform major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo, perform day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities, provide more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities and programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults, develop new parks, and acquire new park land.

For more information or for meeting notification translation please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/lake_city_uv/ For questions about the project or if you need an interpreter or accommodations please contact Karimah Cooper Edwards at 206-233-0063 or Karimah.edwards@seattle.gov.

Advancing Equitable Outreach and Engagement

Message from Kathy Nyland, Director

Mayor Murray recently issued an Executive Order directing the city to approach outreach and engagement in an equitable manner. Putting an equity lens on our approaches is bold and, yes, brave. It shows a commitment to practices that address accessibility and equity.


What does this mean?

  • We often hear that meetings can feel like we are “checking a box.” The Mayor’s action means we can create processes that are more relationship-based and build authentic partnerships.
  • It means that we can create plans that are culturally sensitive, which includes an emphasis on translated materials.
  • It means we broaden access points, identify obstacles and turn them into opportunities.


What else does this mean?

  • It means we have an opportunity to recreate, re-envision and reconcile many lingering issues, including defining the difference between neighborhoods and communities, providing clarity about roles, and creating a system of engagement that builds partnerships with, and between, communities throughout the city of Seattle.
  • It means that we will be working to expand choices and opportunities for community members throughout this city, recognizing a special responsibility to plan for the needs of those who face barriers to participation.
  • It means that we’ll work with city offices and departments on community involvement to ensure that they are effective and efficient through the wise use and management of all resources, including the community’s time.
  • And it means we will expand the toolbox and make some investments in digital engagement.

 

Seattle is a unique city, and we are fortunate to have so many valuable partners currently at the proverbial table. Those partners play an important role and that role will continue. While we are appreciative of the countless hours our volunteers spend making our city better, we recognize and acknowledge there are barriers to participation. There are communities who cannot be at the table, while there are some communities who don’t even know there is a table. This is where the Department of Neighborhoods comes in.

This is not a power grab. It is a power share. At the heart of this Executive Order is a commitment to advance the effective deployment of equitable and inclusive community engagement strategies across all city departments. This is about making information and opportunities for participation more accessible to communities throughout the city.

 

“This is not about silencing voices. It’s the exact opposite. It’s about bringing more people into the conversations or at least creating opportunities for people to participate so they can be heard.”

 
Face-to-face meetings are incredibly important and those are not going away. But not every person can attend a community meeting, and the ability to do so should not determine who gets to participate and who gets to be heard.

We’d love to hear what tools YOU need to be successful and how WE can help you. Share your ideas with us:

  • Send an email to NewDON@seattle.gov.
  • Share your comments below.
  • Contact us at 206-684-0464 or mail us at P.O. Box 94649, Seattle, WA 98124-4649.
  • Join and follow the conversation online using #AdvancingEquitySEA at:

Facebook – @SeattleNeighborhoods
Twitter – @SeaNeighborhood

This is about making things easier and less exhaustive. This is about connecting communities to government and to one another. This is about moving forward.

Kathy Nyland, Director
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods

Seattle Parks and Recreation invites input on design of new Lake City park

Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR) invites the Lake City community to an Open House on Thursday, July 28 for the design development of a new park in Lake City. Join SPR planner and ELM Environment’s designers from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 12501 28th Ave NE, just north of the Lake City branch library, or from 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. at the Lake City Farmer’s Market, NE 125th St. & 28th Ave. NE, to learn about the new park and provide design input.

SPR purchased the property located at 12510 33rd Ave NE 98125 in 2010 with funding from the 2008 Parks and Green Spaces Levy, to provide additional open space for the Lake City community. The events on July 28 are an opportunity for the community to participate in the design and are the first public events for the new park. To provide additional feedback the community is encouraged to participate in this survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LakeCityHUV

Funding for this park project is provided by Seattle Park District to preserve open space in urban areas throughout Seattle. Approved by voters in 2014, the Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation, including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously acquired sites.

2016 is the first full year of implementation and will include funding to tackle the $267-million major maintenance backlog, improve and rehabilitate community centers, preserve the urban forest, perform major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo, perform day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities, provide more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities and programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults, develop new parks, and acquire new park land.

For more information or for meeting notification translation please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/lake_city_uv/. For questions about the project or if you need an interpreter or accommodations please contact Karimah Cooper Edwards at (206)233-0063 or Karimah.edwards@seattle.gov.