A Nation Is a Massacre: Art activation on King Street Station Plaza

Demian DinéYazhi’ and R.I.S.E.: Radical Indigenous Survivance & Empowerment
Saturday, August 4 2018 – 11am-7pm, King Street Station Plaza – 4th Ave S. & Jackson St
Free – Open to the Public – All Ages – Bring items to silkscreen

 

Demian DinéYazhi & R.I.S.E.: Radical Indigenous Survivance & Empowerment

 

A Nation is a Massacre creates awareness about ongoing settler-induced violence against Indigenous bodies. Presented here is the project’s newest version, adapted for King Street Station by artist/activist initiative R.I.S.E.: Radical Indigenous Survivance & Empowerment and its founder Demian DinéYazhi’, in collaboration with yəhaw̓.

Text and image-based posters from A Nation is a Massacre will be screen-printed on site and distributed for free to the public. Visitors are invited to bring their own shirts, totes, patches, flags, or other memorabilia to have printed. The Indigenous Vote booth will also be present for new voter registrations.

On the occasion of the fourth annual Seattle Art Fair, with the influx of visitors it brings onto Coast Salish land, Demian DinéYazhi´ and yəhaw̓ hope that this installation of A Nation Is a Massacre will create cross-cultural connections and broader social engagement with Indigenous activism and our shared rights to life.

This project is supported by the City of Seattle’s Office of Arts & Culture.

ARTS welcomes S. Surface as the new King Street Station programming lead!

S. Surface is a Seattle-based curator of art, design and architecture, currently King Street Station Program Lead with the Seattle Office of Arts and Culture. Previously, Surface was co-curator of The Alice, an artist-run exhibition space and writers’ residency, and Out Of Sight 2017, a regional survey of Pacific Northwest artists. As Program Director at Design in Public, Surface organized the annual city-wide Seattle Design Festival and curated at the Center for Architecture & Design.

Trained in graphic design, photography and entrepreneurship at Parsons School of Design, and with a M.Arch from Yale School of Architecture, Surface has been a visiting critic at the University of Washington College of Built Environments, an architect with super-interesting; research coordinator and editor with C-LAB, Volume Architectural Journal, and the Network Architecture Lab at Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation; and a teaching fellow in the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies department at Yale University. Surface served on the Seattle Arts Commission and on the board of Architects, Designers and Planners for Social Responsibility

Photo credit: Matthew Hilger

 

ARTS announces the inaugural exhibition at King Street Station, yəhaw’, opening winter 2018

Call for Indigenous Creatives, open March 5 – April 20, 2018

 

SEATTLE – In recognition of the Coast Salish peoples on whose land the City of Seattle is built, the Office of Arts & Culture is honored to open a new arts and cultural hub on the third floor of King Street Station this winter with the inaugural Indigenous-centered exhibition yəhaw̓. The title of the exhibition, yəhaw̓, is drawn from the Coast Salish story of Native people from all tribes uniting around a common cause and lifting up the sky together. In the spirit of the story, this exhibition will celebrate the depth and diversity of Indigenous art made in the Pacific Northwest.

King Street Station. Seattle, Washington.
ZGF Architects
© Benjamin Benschneider All rights Reserved. Usage rights may be arranged by contacting Benjamin Benschneider Photography. Email: bbenschneider@comcast.net or phone 206-789-5973

Reflecting on the Lifting the Sky story and the use of Indigenous language in the exhibition title, Puyallup tribal member Tami Hohn shared, “Our ancestors left us the gift of our traditional knowledge and beliefs by preserving our language. Using our language throughout our communities and projects, such as this, honors what our ancestors have done and keeps our language alive.” Tami is a Southern Lushootseed curriculum developer for the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe and has worked with the language for 25 years. Vi Hilbert’s telling of the Lifting the Sky story as part of the Spring Revels, can be viewed at http://bela.music.washington.edu/ethno/hilbert/voicesVideo.html

In preparation for the exhibition, curators Tracy Rector (Seminole/Choctaw), Asia Tail (Cherokee Nation), and Satpreet Kahlon opened a call for artwork in any media by Indigenous creatives living in the Pacific Northwest. All Indigenous creatives who apply will be included in the exhibition. The exhibition will be a collective portrait of Native America, including creatives of all ages and stages in their careers, from many tribal affiliations, working in a variety of creative mediums. yəhaw̓ celebrates all Native makers, and actively challenges the false divides between fine art and craft, Urban and Reservation, contemporary and traditional. For more information, including guidelines, eligibility, and the application please visit yehawshow.com

“When we open this winter, King Street Station will reflect our unique city, and hopefully become a national model for how arts and culture can support a truly equitable society, empowering individuals, artists, and organizations,” says Randy Engstrom, ARTS Director. “Opening the space with an exhibition that centers and celebrates Indigenous voices is an honor for our office and the first of many exhibitions and programs that will reflect our diverse Seattle community.”

The arts hub at King Street Station will be a new kind of space in which communities of color have increased opportunities to present their work, and be seen and heard. Grounded in community feedback, the programming and cultural space of King Street Station will be an incubator for artists and communities, experimenting with the best ways to respond to community needs in an ever-changing city. ARTS’ goal for King Street Station is to be a resource for the city and the embodiment of the Office’s commitment to racial equity.

ARTS releases the King Street Station Community Feedback Report

Community feedback is being used to inform the programming at King Street Station

 

SEATTLE – The Seattle Office of Arts & Culture (ARTS) announced the release of the King Street Station Community Feedback Report. The report represents over 500 individuals and encompasses their thoughts, dreams and ideas on how to program a new arts and cultural hub at King Street Station with the goal of realizing tangible impacts in race and social justice. ARTS is using the information gathered from the community to create an innovative programming model for King Street Station. The goal of King Street Station is to increase opportunities for communities of color to present their work.

King Street Station will be a dedicated cultural space and provide public access to presentation and creative spaces, ARTS staff and resources, space for city convenings, and professional development, meeting space and other services that were requested through the outreach process. ARTS is planning to open King Street Station in fall 2018.

In 2016, ARTS engaged in an inclusive, city-wide outreach effort to hear from the community about their needs. Throughout the year ARTS conducted three public listening sessions and hosted 16 focus groups focusing on voices of people of color including Latinx – Hispanic, Asian, Asian American and Asian Pacific Islander, African, African American and Black, and Native artists.

The report is divided into four themes, racial equity and inclusion, art that reflects the city, strengthening Seattle’s creative economy by supporting artists, and community ownership that promotes accessibility. Each section outlines community feedback and opportunities to address these issues.

The feedback report will directly inform the programming model and while not all of the ideas in the report are within ARTS scope it provides the city with an incredible opportunity to create a nimble and flexible model that can address the needs of the community. The information gathered in this report will not only inform the programming model for King Street Station, it will also help inform how racial equity and social justice is manifest throughout ARTS’ work.

Image: August 10, 2016 King Street Station public meeting photo by Sunita Martini

ARTS releases the King Street Station Community Feedback Report

Community feedback is being used to inform the programming at King Street Station

 

SEATTLE – The Seattle Office of Arts & Culture (ARTS) announced the release of the King Street Station Community Feedback Report. The report represents over 500 individuals and encompasses their thoughts, dreams and ideas on how to program a new arts and cultural hub at King Street Station with the goal of realizing tangible impacts in race and social justice. ARTS is using the information gathered from the community to create an innovative programming model for King Street Station. The goal of King Street Station is to increase opportunities for communities of color to present their work.

King Street Station will be a dedicated cultural space and provide public access to presentation and creative spaces, ARTS staff and resources, space for city convenings, and professional development, meeting space and other services that were requested through the outreach process. ARTS is planning to open King Street Station in fall 2018.

In 2016, ARTS engaged in an inclusive, city-wide outreach effort to hear from the community about their needs. Throughout the year ARTS conducted three public listening sessions and hosted 16 focus groups focusing on voices of people of color including Latinx – Hispanic, Asian, Asian American and Asian Pacific Islander, African, African American and Black, and Native artists.

The report is divided into four themes, racial equity and inclusion, art that reflects the city, strengthening Seattle’s creative economy by supporting artists, and community ownership that promotes accessibility. Each section outlines community feedback and opportunities to address these issues.

The feedback report will directly inform the programming model and while not all of the ideas in the report are within ARTS scope it provides the city with an incredible opportunity to create a nimble and flexible model that can address the needs of the community. The information gathered in this report will not only inform the programming model for King Street Station, it will also help inform how racial equity and social justice is manifest throughout ARTS’ work.

Image: August 10, 2016 King Street Station public meeting photo by Sunita Martini