Beacon Hill Public Art Bike Tour

Grab your helmets and join us for a FREE bicycle tour of public art in the Beacon Hill neighborhood.

Partnering with Seattle Neighborhood Greenways, the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture is offering a family-friendly, seven-mile (round trip) bike tour for all ages and abilities that will take you from Jimi Hendrix Park/Northwest African-American Museum to Jefferson Park.

We will stop to view these public artworks—including the four sites below in the City’s collection—and more, including at the Centilia Cultural Center at El Centro:

Artists Elizabeth Conner (Drawing the Land and Painting and Sculpting the Land) and Gerard Tsutakawa (Urban Peace Circle), and others will join us to talk about their artworks. Participants will also learn about other bike routes in the region that feature prominent public artworks.

Date: Saturday, September 15
Tour Time: 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Tour starts: Jimi Hendrix Park, 2400 S Massachusetts St. (24th Ave S & S Massachusetts St). Meet at the shelter (pictured here).

This easy-paced tour will take you on public streets, bicycle lanes and multi-use trails. Participants need to provide their own bike (or use a dock-less ride share bike) and helmets are required.

We Power: 10 Seattle Summer Attractions

It takes great power to make the Seattle area as exciting as it is; power that’s fueled by people and technology. Unlike some electric utilities that are driven by investors, City Light is a publicly owned utility which answers to its customers. Together, we power some pretty amazing things and we do it carbon free.

Summer is right around the corner and you’re probably planning your time in the sun right now. Here’s a top 10 list of “we power” summer attractions to help you appreciate how we do things in Seattle.

Seattle Parks and Recreation, Seattle Department of Transportation and Feet First collaborate on Safe Routes to School project

Representatives from Seattle Parks and Recreation, Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT), Feet First, and the Beacon Hill community cut the ribbon on an improved sidewalk and route to school for Asa Mercer International Middle School on Dec. 1, 2015.

Seattle Parks and Recreation, Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT), Feet First, and the Beacon Hill community cut the ribbon on an improved sidewalk and route to school for Asa Mercer International Middle School on Dec. 1, 2015. The project improved the sidewalk, drainage, and parking along 16th Ave. S between S Dakota St. and S Nevada St., just west of the Jefferson Playfield. The new improvements were in response to access and safety concerns to increase safety and walkability for the students as well as the community.

The walkway is one of the main routes to school for many Asa Mercer International Middle School students and prior to this project was often unusable due to puddling and mud from the adjacent hill. This improved sidewalk joins with the Beacon Hill Neighborhood Greenway, improving the connection for residents to the school and Jefferson Park.

Seattle Parks and Recreation and LPD Engineering designed the new drainage swale to include green stormwater infrastructure, small native trees to the west of the sidewalk and a french drain to the east of the sidewalk. The new street trees contribute to the city’s goal of increasing the urban canopy 30% by 2037. Spring blooming bulbs will be planted in the tree pits embracing Asa Mercer’s school colors of blue and white. Improvements also include parking surfacing, wheel stops, and a rockery wall.

Feet First works to ensure all communities in Washington are walkable. Since 2005, Feet First has successfully worked on comprehensive Safe Routes to School programs in Seattle and throughout the state.  For more information about Feet First contact Teresa Frizzell, Safe Routes to School Program Director at Teresa@feetfirst.org or 206-652-2310. For more information about the project please contact Katie Bang, Project Manager, Seattle Parks and Recreation at Katie.Bang@seattle.gov or 206-684-9286.

 

Seattle Parks and Recreation, Seattle Department of Transportation and Feet First collaborate on Safe Routes to School project

Representatives from Seattle Parks and Recreation, Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT), Feet First, and the Beacon Hill community cut the ribbon on an improved sidewalk and route to school for Asa Mercer International Middle School on Dec. 1, 2015.

Seattle Parks and Recreation, Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT), Feet First, and the Beacon Hill community cut the ribbon on an improved sidewalk and route to school for Asa Mercer International Middle School on Dec. 1, 2015. The project improved the sidewalk, drainage, and parking along 16th Ave. S between S Dakota St. and S Nevada St., just west of the Jefferson Playfield. The new improvements were in response to access and safety concerns to increase safety and walkability for the students as well as the community.

The walkway is one of the main routes to school for many Asa Mercer International Middle School students and prior to this project was often unusable due to puddling and mud from the adjacent hill. This improved sidewalk joins with the Beacon Hill Neighborhood Greenway, improving the connection for residents to the school and Jefferson Park.

Seattle Parks and Recreation and LPD Engineering designed the new drainage swale to include green stormwater infrastructure, small native trees to the west of the sidewalk and a french drain to the east of the sidewalk. The new street trees contribute to the city’s goal of increasing the urban canopy 30% by 2037. Spring blooming bulbs will be planted in the tree pits embracing Asa Mercer’s school colors of blue and white. Improvements also include parking surfacing, wheel stops, and a rockery wall.

Feet First works to ensure all communities in Washington are walkable. Since 2005, Feet First has successfully worked on comprehensive Safe Routes to School programs in Seattle and throughout the state.  For more information about Feet First contact Teresa Frizzell, Safe Routes to School Program Director at Teresa@feetfirst.org or 206-652-2310. For more information about the project please contact Katie Bang, Project Manager, Seattle Parks and Recreation at Katie.Bang@seattle.gov or 206-684-9286.

 

Fall 2015 Public Art Conservation Highlights

Whether you live, work or play in the city, chances are good that you’ve run into construction resulting from the Mercer Corridor Project, an improvement project stretching along Mercer Street from I-5 to 5th Avenue West. Portions of the project included sidewalk renovations in front of the Phelps Center, where two Chinese Guardian Lion sculptures have stood guard since 1974.

This project gave conservation staff a chance to carefully clean and apply protective coatings to the longstanding pair. The Guardian Lions were given to the city from Taiwan as a memento of their participation in the Seattle World’s Fair in 1962. The sculptures were carved by Chinese artisans under the supervision of the Taiwan Handicraft Promotion Center. Seattle City Councilman, Wing Luke was instrumental in the city receiving this gift in 1963.

On a foggy day at Magnuson Park your eyes might just deceive you into thinking you’ve happened upon an earth-bound pod of killer whales. But this imaginative installation is actually comprised of inverted diving fins from decommissioned US Navy attack submarines.

Working in collaboration with artist John Young and former students from the University of Washington, the fins were treated for corrosion and re-painted in September to restore their luminous surfaces.

Bordering the northeast corner of Beacon Hill is an expansive golf course with a resonant history. In 1915, Jefferson Park Municipal Golf Course opened to the public after golf activists E.C. Cheasty and Sherwood Gillespy presented the Seattle City Council with a 1,000 signature petition requesting the creation of an 18-hole course at Jefferson Park. Unfortunately, both men passed away before knowing if their efforts were successful, yet in honor of his tireless dedication, friends of Sherwood Gillespy commissioned Danish sculptor Max Nielson to create a bronze sculpture in his likeness. This year marks 100 years that the statue has welcomed visitors to the clubhouse, and conservation activities included fabrication and replacement of the bronze reservoirs that embellish the granite foundation.