Public meeting scheduled to discuss zoning modifications for development of Daniel Bagley Elementary School

The public is invited to discuss the development plans for Daniel Bagley Elementary School located at 7821 Stone Ave N. The meeting will be held on Wednesday, April 25 at 6 p.m. at Green Lake Elementary School, 2400 N. 65th St. The Seattle School District is requesting modifications (known as a “departures”) from select City zoning regulations for the following:

    1. Increased building height.
    2. Less than required on-site parking.

The Seattle School District will make a presentation on the requested modifications before the Daniel Bagley Elementary School Development Standards Departure Advisory Committee, a group composed of neighbors, and Seattle School District and City representatives. After the presentation, the public is invited to provide comments. Following public comments, the committee will deliberate and consider the District’s requests. Additional meetings may be held, if needed.

If community members cannot attend the meeting, written comments can be submitted by Monday, April 23 to: 

Maureen Sheehan
E-mail: Maureen.Sheehan@seattle.gov
Mailing Address:  Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, P.O. Box 94649, Seattle WA 98124-4649

For additional information or to request an interpreter (by April 18) for the meeting, contact Maureen Sheehan, Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, at 206-684-0302.

The Major Institutions and Schools Program provides a way for neighbors of Seattle’s hospitals, universities, and colleges to be directly involved in the development plans for those institutions to ensure neighborhood concerns are considered when those plans are made. It is a program of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods.

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Community invited to provide input on design of new Greenwood/Phinney park

Seattle Parks and Recreation invites the community to provide input on design options for the new park in the Greenwood/Phinney neighborhood. Join Seattle Parks and Recreation’s planner and Cascade Design Collaborative’s designers at the Phinney Neighborhood Center, 6532 Phinney Ave. N in room 7, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 2. The design options include elements the community has identified as important such as play, open space, seating, spaces for gathering and fellowship, as well as attractive landscaping. Families, neighbors, and the Phinney/Greenwood community is encouraged to attend.

Seattle Parks and Recreation purchased two property sites between N 81st and N 82nd on the east side of Greenwood to develop a park (the mini-mart site purchased in Nov. 2012 and the pub property immediately north, which was purchased in July 2015). The two buildings will be demolished in fall 2016.

 The Seattle Park District will fund the development of the south parcel to provide the Greenwood/Phinney urban area access to open space. Design and public input will be completed for both the north and south parcels to create a seamless design, however, only the south parcel will be constructed in 2017. The north parcel will include open lawn until funding for the north parcel is received.

 For community members that are unable to attend the meeting, the design option boards and comment sheets will be posted at the Phinney Neighborhood Center, the Greenwood branch library and on the project website following the public meeting on Nov. 2.

Approved by voters in 2014, the Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously acquired sites. 2016 is the first full year of implementation and will include funding to tackle the $267-million major maintenance backlog; and will fund the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of the urban forest; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land.

If you need an interpreter or accommodations, please contact Karimah Cooper Edwards, Seattle Parks and Recreation, at 206-233-0064 or Karimah.edwards@seattle.gov. For more information about the project please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/greenwood_phinney_uv/.

 

 

 

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Advancing Equitable Outreach and Engagement

Message from Kathy Nyland, Director

Mayor Murray recently issued an Executive Order directing the city to approach outreach and engagement in an equitable manner. Putting an equity lens on our approaches is bold and, yes, brave. It shows a commitment to practices that address accessibility and equity.


What does this mean?

  • We often hear that meetings can feel like we are “checking a box.” The Mayor’s action means we can create processes that are more relationship-based and build authentic partnerships.
  • It means that we can create plans that are culturally sensitive, which includes an emphasis on translated materials.
  • It means we broaden access points, identify obstacles and turn them into opportunities.


What else does this mean?

  • It means we have an opportunity to recreate, re-envision and reconcile many lingering issues, including defining the difference between neighborhoods and communities, providing clarity about roles, and creating a system of engagement that builds partnerships with, and between, communities throughout the city of Seattle.
  • It means that we will be working to expand choices and opportunities for community members throughout this city, recognizing a special responsibility to plan for the needs of those who face barriers to participation.
  • It means that we’ll work with city offices and departments on community involvement to ensure that they are effective and efficient through the wise use and management of all resources, including the community’s time.
  • And it means we will expand the toolbox and make some investments in digital engagement.

 

Seattle is a unique city, and we are fortunate to have so many valuable partners currently at the proverbial table. Those partners play an important role and that role will continue. While we are appreciative of the countless hours our volunteers spend making our city better, we recognize and acknowledge there are barriers to participation. There are communities who cannot be at the table, while there are some communities who don’t even know there is a table. This is where the Department of Neighborhoods comes in.

This is not a power grab. It is a power share. At the heart of this Executive Order is a commitment to advance the effective deployment of equitable and inclusive community engagement strategies across all city departments. This is about making information and opportunities for participation more accessible to communities throughout the city.

 

“This is not about silencing voices. It’s the exact opposite. It’s about bringing more people into the conversations or at least creating opportunities for people to participate so they can be heard.”

 
Face-to-face meetings are incredibly important and those are not going away. But not every person can attend a community meeting, and the ability to do so should not determine who gets to participate and who gets to be heard.

We’d love to hear what tools YOU need to be successful and how WE can help you. Share your ideas with us:

  • Send an email to NewDON@seattle.gov.
  • Share your comments below.
  • Contact us at 206-684-0464 or mail us at P.O. Box 94649, Seattle, WA 98124-4649.
  • Join and follow the conversation online using #AdvancingEquitySEA at:

Facebook – @SeattleNeighborhoods
Twitter – @SeaNeighborhood

This is about making things easier and less exhaustive. This is about connecting communities to government and to one another. This is about moving forward.

Kathy Nyland, Director
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods

People’s Academy for Community Engagement Now Accepting Applications

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods is accepting applications to the People’s Academy for Community Engagement (PACE), our civic leadership development program for the next wave of community leaders. The fall session begins September 27 and runs through December 6.

During the 10-week program, 25-30 emerging leaders (18 years and up) will learn hands-on strategies for community building, accessing government, and inclusive engagement from experts in the field. PACE has a strong focus on Seattle’s community and neighborhood organizations and the city’s governmental structure and processes.

Fall sessions will be held on Tuesday evenings from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. at Miller Community Center. Topics include: Approaches to Leadership, Government 101, Community Organizing, Inclusive Outreach and Public Engagement, Meeting Facilitation, Public Speaking, Conflict Resolution, and Sustaining Involvement.

Tuition for the 10-week program is $100. Tuition assistance is available. To apply, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/programs-and-services/peoples-academy-for-community-engagement/pace-application. The application deadline is Friday, August 12 at 5:00 p.m.

Given the popularity of the program, PACE will be offered three times a year: winter, spring and fall. The winter session will begin in January of 2017. For more information, visit our webpage and for questions, email PACE@seattle.gov.

Community invited to provide input for a new Greenwood/Phinney park

Seattle Parks and Recreation invites the community to provide input for a new park in the Greenwood/Phinney neighborhood. Please join Seattle Parks and Recreation’s Planner and Cascade Design Collaborative’s designers at the Greenwood Car Show between11 a.m. and 1 p.m. at 8100 Greenwood Ave N. This project provides additional open space for the neighborhood by developing the Seattle Parks and Recreation property located between 81st and 82nd on the east side of Greenwood. This is the first of three public meetings. We will be gathering thoughts and ideas around the character of the park.

The Open House is an opportunity to learn about the project and gather the community’s ideas for the park design. Please participate in this survey https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/GreenPhinn and participate in the Pinterest account https://www.pinterest.com/greenwoodphinn/

Seattle Parks and Recreation purchased two property sites between N. 81st and N. 82nd in November 2012 and July 2015. The two buildings will be demolished in the fall 2016.

Funding for the development of the sites into a park is provided by Seattle Park District Approved by voters in 2014, the Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously acquired sites. 2016 is the first full year of implementation and will include funding to tackle the $267-million major maintenance backlog; and will fund the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of the urban forest; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land.

If you need an interpreter or accommodations please contact Karimah Cooper Edwards at 206-233-0064 or Karimah.edwards@seattle.gov.

For more information about the project please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/greenwood_phinney_uv/