New Cookin’ with Kilowatts Cookbook for the Energy-Conscious Foodie


Over the summer of 2017, Seattle City Light solicited its customers to take part in our Cookin’ with Kilowatts cooking contest with a mission: Conserving energy! We asked for recipes using a cooking method that uses less electricity than an oven or stovetop, and you delivered. Over 90 customers sent in recipes for this year’s contest.

Everyone that participated received a free chef’s hat and oven mitt, and those that finished in the third through seventh spots received a $25 gift card from contest sponsor Sea Wolf Bakers. The first and second place winners received an Instant Pot® and cooking class, respectively.

All the winners have been notified via email and the prizes have been distributed. Now, just in time for the holidays, we have published our third edition of the Cookin’ with Kilowatts cookbook. There’s often heavy use of electric ovens at this time of year, which can run up electric bills.

Want to get a preview? Here are three recipes from Cookin’ with Kilowatts Vol. III which will save you energy and money.

Skye Bars (and a Latte to Boot!)

“Utilize an espresso maker’s steam as an energy source (and then you get a glorious latte to boot) to heat the milk.” – Barbara K., Lake Forest Park

5 minutes in an espresso maker

Pan spray
2-2 1/2 C rolled oats
1 1/2 C chopped almonds and walnuts mixture
1 C raisins
1 C nut butter (any)
1 C milk (any)
3/4 C honey
(or agave/maple syrup)
1/2 C chocolate chips (optional)

Line 8″ x 8″ baking dish with plastic wrap, and spray with pan spray.

Mix the nuts and dried fruit, set aside.

Heat milk by loading espresso maker with coffee and allowing steam to build.

Steam milk until very warm (this step is doable with crockpot or microwave).

Quickly add 3/4 C of the hot milk to the honey and nut butter, and stir until well blended. (If using an espresso maker for this step, stop and pour yourself a latte with the freshly brewed coffee and warm milk.)

Mix wet with dry ingredients, stirring to coat well, adding more cereal/nuts as needed until mixture is stiff.

While still warm (but not hot), add chips (if using), not letting the chips melt.

Place in baking dish, and press firmly.

Put in fridge for 3 hours. Cut and enjoy.

Chicken Curry

“I love the aroma that fills the house during cooking. I take the naan or pita bread and either microwave it or place it on the lid of the slow cooker to get it nice and warm.” – Hina A, Seattle

6 to 6.5 hours in a crockpot

4 large chicken breasts (frozen is preferred, but not necessary) 3/4 C yogurt
1 C olive oil
2 tbsp ginger paste
3 large serrano chilies (spicy)
5 tbsp lemon juice;
1 bag of Shan curry spice mix
1 pouch instant quinoa

Place all ingredients into a crockpot in order listed above.

If chicken is frozen, set the crockpot on high for first 4 hours and low for next 2.5 hours. If the chicken is thawed, set the crockpot on low for 6 hours.

1/2 way through cooking time, stir the meat in the crockpot to make sure all ingredients are well mixed and cut the chicken into pieces with scissors.

3 minutes before it is done, put quinoa pouch in the microwave for 90 seconds and serve.

Serve with naan (optional).

 

Sweet & Smoky Pork Tacos

“I’ve tried a few “sweet pork” recipes but wasn’t very impressed with most of them. Thinking about all the different flavors I wanted and their relationship to each other was fun.” – Alicia E., Seattle

30 minutes in an Instant Pot®

For marinade:
3/4 C soy sauce
1/3 C (packed) brown sugar 1/3 C cider or red wine vinegar 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground cardamom

2.5-3 lbs pork roast, trimmed and cut into 1-inch chunks
1 tbsp canola oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped 4 oz can of diced green chilies 2 C your choice salsa
1/2 C (packed) brown sugar
1/2 C water
1 tsp ground cumin
2 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp oregano
1/4 tsp smoked paprika
1 tsp liquid smoke
Juice of 2 limes

Mix marinade ingredients in a gallon bag, add pork chunks.

Marinate for 1 hour or overnight.

Discard marinade.

Turn the pot to sauté feature, add oil.

Brown pork chunks.

Add the rest of the ingredients, stir.

Close pot, set high psi for 30 minutes.

Serve with corn tortillas, salsa, limes and cilantro.

To see the other winners (including our first and second place recipes, which are delicious!) you’re welcome to view the cookbook here. You can also see Vol. I here and Vol. II here.

 

See Skagit: Dam Good Chicken Dinner

This summer, see the many places and meet the many faces of Skagit.

Chris is a culinary force of the Gorge Inn at City Light’s Skagit Project

Meet Chris Gochenour. He’s part of the culinary team behind Skagit’s hottest dinner reservation—the immensely popular Dam Good Chicken Dinner. When he’s not cranking out chicken for hungry visitors, you can catch Chris serving up meals at the Gorge Inn, a dining hall in Newhalem that caters to City Light employees and workers. Chris recently sat down with us for a quick chat about cooking, chicken and tradition.

What attracted you to working in Skagit?
“Working at a national park. I used to work at Denali National Park as a head chef at one of the park’s lodges. I’ve always liked working in this type of environment so here I am.”

Can you share a little bit about the history of the area?
“There used to be a train that came up here in the early 1900s which allowed folks to see the landscape up here and enjoy the mountains. It also helped to promote the Skagit Hydroelectric Project and educate people about the dams.”

The Gorge Inn is a fixture at City Light’s Skagit Project

The Dam Good Chicken Dinner is longstanding tradition here at the Gorge Inn. Tell us about that.
“The dinner is a signature stamp of the Gorge Inn. It’s a tradition that goes back to the 1930s. When we cook this meal, we’re recreating the magic of the dinner that was served back then. A lot of people have passed through these doors JUST for this dinner. It’s cool to be part of its history—to serve a historic meal. It’s only featured in the summer so it’s in demand when the season comes around.

Dam Good Chicken Dinner is made especially at City Light’s Skagit Project

“The chicken itself is oven baked, but somehow, some way it looks like regular fried chicken. It’s breaded, buttered and cooked at a high temperature. It’s a recipe that has been passed down for generations. The dinner comes with a side of mashed potatoes which are cooked with rosemary and garlic. We also infuse thyme into the cream. Fresh green beans and homemade gravy complete the entrée.

Freshly baked Apple Blueberry pie—a specialty of the Gorge Inn

“Then there’s dessert. We bake a fresh pie each dinner. Our usual flavors are peach and apple blueberry—all locally sourced ingredients. We’ve also served other flavors; it just depends on the season.”

Tell us about the people who attend the Damn Good Chicken Dinner.
“A lot of people from the nearby campgrounds will plan the dinner as part of their trip. We have a lot of families. Other folks have heard about it in Seattle and make a little road trip out of it. Then, of course, there are those who book it as part of the Ladder Creek Falls tour, which makes for a great evening here.”

Can you describe the vibe of the Gorge Inn on these dinner nights?
“It’s friendly—a communal atmosphere. A lot of folks talk to one another. They meet new people sitting at their tables, talk about similar interests and learn what they might have in common. It always happens that a group will meet hiking on a trail and then they unexpectedly run into each other at the dinner.  Everyone is generally pretty happy by the end of the meal.” T

hank you, Chris, for providing a sneak peek of the “Skagit Magic” one can expect when visiting the Gorge Inn, an historic part of Seattle City Light’s Skagit River Hydroelectric Project which provides clean, low-cost, renewable power to Seattle. To learn more or to secure your reservation for the Dam Good Chicken dinner, click here

Local Global Eats: Plate of Nations is March 25-April 10

This Friday the MLK Business Association kicks off Plate of Nations, its signature dine-around event, now in its sixth year.

 

From March 25 through April 10, you’re invited to explore international cuisine at 14 restaurants in Rainier Valley, one of the most culturally diverse communities in the country. Participating restaurants along Martin Luther King Jr. Way will offer $15 and $25 menus designed to be shared – come hungry and bring your family and friends.

 

Up for a Challenge?

Visit all 14 restaurants (or at least eight of them), collecting Plate of Nations passport stamps as you go, and enter to win these great prizes:

  • Grand Prize (12+ stamps): Private cooking class for four with Farah and Amina Ismail and family, owners of Bananas Grill. Learn and taste your way throughMediterranean and Northeast African Halal specialties.
  • First Prize (10+ stamps, 2 winners): Kindle Fire HD
  • Second Prize (8+ stamps, 5 winners): Hello Othello tote bags + bonus swag

Additional prizes, including gift cards from participating restaurants, will be announced throughout the event on the Plate of Nations Facebook page. Learn more about the Plate of Nations Passport and contests here.

Grand Prize: private cooking class for four with Bananas Grill owner Farah Ismail and family

Where to Go

Participating restaurants are within walking distance of the Mount Baker, Columbia City, and Othello light rail stations.

Here’s where to go and an idea of what you might eat:

 

About Plate of Nations

Plate of Nations was launched in 2011 by the MLK Business Association to create a festive showcase of the diverse menus and cultural traditions of Rainier Valley’s many independently owned eateries.

Last year, Plate of Nations drew diners from 37 Seattle neighborhoods, 25 Washington cities, and 5 states, selling thousands of specials and bringing tens of thousands of dollars in additional revenue into Rainier Valley.

Plate of Nations 2016 is sponsored by the MLK Business Association, City of Seattle’s Office of Economic Development, Vulcan, Rainier Valley Community Development Fund, HomeSight, The Stranger, Northwest Polite Society, and Penniless Projects.

 

King County Executive Launches Local Food Economy Initiative

King County’s new Local Food Economy Initiative brings together farmers, restaurateurs, grocers and distributors to increase healthy, locally grown food in our region. The initiative aims to increase production and consumption of locally grown food and reduce inequities in healthy food access.

Currently, of the nearly $6 billion residents spend per year on food, less than 2% of that spending is directed to King County farms. By addressing barriers to make it easier to get locally grown food into markets and protecting nearby farmlands from development pressure, we can grow that 2%, to the benefit of farmers and the local economy.

Seattle is the largest consumer market for local food in the State, and we wear our love of delicious food proudly. With 13 James Beard award-winning chefs and numerous farm-to-plate restaurants, local food is part of Seattle’s identity and economy.

A shift to more locally grown food would improve our health, as we’d be eating more of the leafy greens and mixed vegetables that our region grows in abundance. Retaining our region’s farmland and growing farm businesses will help strengthen our region’s food security as drought and other impacts from climate change are felt across the country’s food producing areas.

And healthy food should be for everyone. The King County Local Food Initiative also aims to reduce inequities in healthy food access. Currently, 1 in 5 children in King County do not have enough to eat, and healthy food is even harder for many low-income people to afford.  The initiative will develop strategies to improve affordable access to healthy food for low-income populations so that all of our residents can thrive.

Learn more about our regional food system:

King County Executive Launches Local Food Economy Initiative

King County’s new Local Food Economy Initiative brings together farmers, restaurateurs, grocers and distributors to increase healthy, locally grown food in our region. The initiative aims to increase production and consumption of locally grown food and reduce inequities in healthy food access.

Currently, of the nearly $6 billion residents spend per year on food, less than 2% of that spending is directed to King County farms. By addressing barriers to make it easier to get locally grown food into markets and protecting nearby farmlands from development pressure, we can grow that 2%, to the benefit of farmers and the local economy.

Seattle is the largest consumer market for local food in the State, and we wear our love of delicious food proudly. With 13 James Beard award-winning chefs and numerous farm-to-plate restaurants, local food is part of Seattle’s identity and economy.

A shift to more locally grown food would improve our health, as we’d be eating more of the leafy greens and mixed vegetables that our region grows in abundance. Retaining our region’s farmland and growing farm businesses will help strengthen our region’s food security as drought and other impacts from climate change are felt across the country’s food producing areas.

And healthy food should be for everyone. The King County Local Food Initiative also aims to reduce inequities in healthy food access. Currently, 1 in 5 children in King County do not have enough to eat, and healthy food is even harder for many low-income people to afford.  The initiative will develop strategies to improve affordable access to healthy food for low-income populations so that all of our residents can thrive.

Learn more about our regional food system: