Seattle Fire Chief to retire after 44 years with the Department

SEATTLE (Oct. 16, 2014) – Mayor Ed Murray announced today that Chief Gregory M. Dean intends to retire from the Seattle Fire Department after a distinguished 44-year career with the Seattle Fire Department.

“Chief Dean demonstrated the highest commitment to public service over a distinguished career here at the City,” said Murray. “We salute his devotion to the department and to his firefighters. I wish him the best in the future, even as I know I will miss his steady leadership and wise counsel.”

Chief Dean told the mayor in the early days of the new administration that he was looking forward to retirement. The mayor asked him to stay on at least another year.

Last week, Mayor Murray again asked Chief Dean to postpone his departure, but this time the chief told the mayor it was time to enjoy a well-deserved retirement.

“I consider it an honor and privilege to have served as the Fire Chief for the Seattle Fire Department,” said Dean. “I leave with confidence that the department is in good hands with outstanding leadership and vision at all levels of the organization.”

Chief Dean will continue to serve in his position until the end of the year. The mayor is immediately launching a search process to hire a new chief.

Dean entered the Department in 1970 as a trainee firefighter and rose through the ranks to become Chief of the Department in 2004. He served in several senior leadership positions in the department, including Fire Marshal, Assistant Chief of Administration, Deputy Chief of Personnel, and Deputy Chief of Support Services.

Under his leadership, the 1,150 member department has maintained its international reputation for emergency medicine and firefighting operations. He is known throughout the region for his vision and commitment to partnerships with other fire departments and public safety organizations.

During his tenure as Fire Chief, Dean directed the implementation of the Fire Facilities Levy that resulted in the construction and renovation of 32 fire stations, a new Joint Training Facility and new fireboats.

Dean testified before the United States House of Representatives about the department’s efforts to hire more female and LGBT firefighters during the congressional review of the military’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy.

Dean testified before the United States House of Representatives about how the department had integrated female and LGBT firefighters into the fire culture during the congressional review of the military’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy.

He also worked with the Port of Seattle to establish the cruise ship homeport by developing a permit process which allowed safe refueling of cruise ships on the Central Waterfront.

Dean’s career spans landmark fires and events that dramatically altered the course of the Seattle Fire Department. In the early 1970’s, the fatal Ozark Hotel and Seventh Avenue Apartments fires changed national fire and building codes. Firefighters began to serve as paramedics that same decade, saving countless lives in years since. The 1995 Pang warehouse fire killed four Seattle Firefighters, the worst firefighter fatality incident in the department’s history. The 2001 Nisqually Earthquake and the 2010 Fremont fire that killed four children and a young woman captured the nation’s attention.

In the New Year, Dean will be spending more time with family, travelling and improving his golf handicap.

Seattle Fire Day at the MOHAI

 

Date: Saturday, October 11, 2014

Time: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Location: MOHAI – 860 Terry Ave E.

 

On Saturday, October 11th, the Seattle Fire Department, in partnership with the Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) will kick off Fire Prevention Month with a special program: Seattle Fire Day. Join us for a fun day learning about fire safety, past and present.  Admission to the museum will be free from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Visitors can tour antique fire trucks, a modern day fire engine and watch demonstrations of firefighters in full gear. In addition, families and kids can engage in fun fire safety activities with the Seattle Fire Department, participate in hands-on firefighting history, Ask a Firefighter, try on firefighting gear, listen to a firefighter read a story, enjoy a craft and activity center and view the Great Seattle Fire exhibit which includes the infamous glue pot that supposedly started Seattle’s massive blaze of 1889.

For a complete schedule of Seattle Fire Department’s Fire Prevention Month activities, including Firefighter Story Times at Seattle Public Libraries, visit www.seattle.gov/fire

 

Seattle Firefighters Hit the Books to Promote Children’s Literacy

Seattle-The Seattle Fire Department is partnering with the Seattle Public Library for a reading program aimed at increasing literacy, and raising awareness of home fire safety. The Firefighter Story Times at the Seattle Public Library is part of October’s Fire Prevention Month. Seattle Firefighters will read No Dragons for Tea to dozens of preschool children at the Seattle Public Library branches across the city.. Important safety messages include “Firefighters are your friend”, “Crawl low under smoke” and “Get out and stay out”.

For more than a decade, Seattle Firefighters have volunteered for literacy events at various Seattle Public Library’s and Seattle Public Schools. The Firefighter Story Times are part of a month long push to educate the young people of the city and their families on fire safety tips. Preschool children are especially vulnerable to fire and burn injuries. During the month of October, Seattle Firefighters are reading to preschoolers at 10 different libraries throughout the city. Click on this link for more information on the Story Times: Story Time or the Seattle Channel.

Rainier Beach Branch
with Fire Chief Dean
9125 Rainier Ave. S
Monday, October 6
10:30 AM

Ballard Branch
5614 22nd Ave N.W.
Wednesday, October 8
10:30 AM

Douglass-Truth Branch
2300 E. Yesler Way
Thursday, October 9
10:30 AM

Capitol Hill Branch
425 Harvard Ave E.
Monday, October 13
10:30 AM

South Park Branch
8604 Eighth Ave S at S. Cloverdale St.
Wednesday, October 15
11:15 AM

Central Library
2401 24th Ave. E.
Thursday, October 16
11:00 AM

Green Lake Branch
5009 Roosevelt Way NE.
Wednesday, October 22
11:15 AM
High Point Branch
2821 Beacon Ave. S.
Thursday, October 23
11:30 AM

Northeast Branch
8016 Greenwood Ave N
Tuesday, October 28
10:30 AM

New Holly Branch
7048 32nd Ave S
Thursday, October 30
11:00 AM

Firefighters team up with kids to teach fire safety through stories

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    The Seattle Fire Department is partnering with the Seattle Public Libraries for a reading program aimed at increasing literacy, and raising awareness of home fire safety. This popular event, usually held in October, was held during the summer for the first time last year. Because of its overwhelming popularity, Firefighter Story Times are being held again this summer.
Firefighters will read the book No Dragons for Tea to preschool children from all around the city. Important safety messages include “Firefighters are your friend”, “Crawl low under smoke” and “Get out and stay out”. The event will also include a chance to explore a fire engine and give the children the opportunity to get close to firefighters as they put on and explain their protective gear.
For more than a decade, Seattle Firefighters have volunteered for literacy events at various Seattle Public Libraries and Seattle Public Schools. The Firefighter Story Times are a push to educate young people in the city and their families about staying safe from fire. Preschool children are especially vulnerable to fire and burn injuries. During the months of June and July, Seattle Firefighters are reading to preschoolers at 7 different library locations throughout the city.
Come join the firefighters at your local branch library.
Columbia Branch: June 11 @ 11:00 AM

Southwest Branch: June 12 @ 11:00 AM

Queen Anne Branch: July 10 @ 11:00 AM

West Seattle Branch: July 16 @ 10:30 AM

Greenwood Branch: July 24 @ 10:30 AM

University Branch: July 30 @ 11:15 AM

Central Library: July 31 @ 10:30 AM

Denver Fire Chief Pays Off Football Wager With Seattle Fire Chief

                                                                                                                                                                                                                         March 14— While wearing Quarterback Russell Wilson’s Seahawk Jersey, Seattle Fire Chief Gregory Dean installed a donated smoke detector at a Beacon Hill resident’s home. The free installation was payoff for a friendly Big Game wager between Denver Fire Chief Eric Tade and Seattle Fire Chief Dean.

In January, the Chiefs of Seattle Fire and Denver Fire agreed to a challenge proposed by Kidde, a leading manufacturer of fire safety products. According to the friendly bet, the chief whose team wins the Superbowl Championship game would receive 250 of Kidde’s Worry-Free smoke alarms, donated by Kidde. Each alarm has a sealed-in lithium battery to offer nonstop power for 10 years without battery changes or low-battery chirping noises. The chief whose team loses the game would receive 100 of the Worry-Free alarms to install in his community – while wearing the jersey of the winning team.

This month, both Chiefs installed the donated alarms in their respective cities wearing Seahawks Jerseys.

Chief Dean and Engine Company 13 installed smoke alarms in the home of Frank Kiuchi. The 68-year-old retiree contacted the Fire Department to take advantage of the free smoke alarm installation program for qualified homeowners. Kiuchi has lived in the Beacon Hill home for 20 year and says his old smoke alarms were worn out. The Seattle Fire Department advises residents to change their smoke alarms every 10 years.

According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), two-thirds of fire fatalities nationally occur in homes without smoke alarms or without working smoke alarms. The vast majority of non-working smoke alarms are due to missing or dead batteries. Kidde’s sealed-in 10-year battery smoke alarms offer a decade of protection without ever having to replace the battery.

Chief Dean is thankful to Kidde for providing the donated smoke detectors which will help save lives for years to come.

For more information on the Seattle Fire Department Smoke Alarm Program click on this link:

http://www.seattle.gov/fire/pubEd/smokealarms/smokeAlarms.htm