Art Interruptions 2017: Delridge Greenway and Connector Trail

August 3 – December 31, 2017

Temporary artwork in the Delridge Neighborhood Greenway and Connector Trail

The Office of Arts & Culture, in partnership with the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT), commissioned seven emerging public artists to create temporary art installations within the Delridge Neighborhood Greenway and Delridge Connector Trail for Art Interruptions 2017. The artworks inhabit city sidewalks and parks and offer passers-by a brief interruption in their day, eliciting a moment of surprise, beauty, contemplation or humor. Art Interruptions is funded by the Seattle Department of Transportation 1% for Arts Funds.

Art Interruptions Walking Tour Saturday, October 7, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Explore the West Seattle neighborhood, experience Art Interruptions and meet the participated artists. Hosted by Feet First; visit ww.feetfirst.org for detailed updates.

Black Teen Wearing Hoodie
Jasmine Brown

Jasmine Brown created a series of images portraying black teenage boys in hoodies, commemorating the fifth anniversary of Trayvon Martin’s death. She created the artworks by first taking photographs of boys doing ordinary things like petting a cat, playing an instrument, reading a book, or talking on a cell phone, and then manipulated the photos using digital techniques to make the images pop. Once completed, her paintings were transferred onto vinyl. Brown’s artworks appear on signal boxes, street furniture, and sites along the Greenway, varying in size between 2 ft x 2 ft portraits to 5 – 6 ft high life-size images.

Wild & Creative Wonders
Susan Brown

Susan Brown made a sequence of Creative Comedy Dramas – a series of theatrical historic collage characters installed on poles and walls along the Delridge Neighborhood Greenway. Two to four stationary character puppets depicting dancers and musicians are installed at each location. Most of the puppets have human bodies with faces adapted from antique illustrations or recent photographs of animals, including cats, dogs, wild mammals, and mythical creatures, and are dressed in culturally diverse historic costumes. Varying in size between 12 – 18 inches, these multi-color collage figures were created using illustrations found in antique publications and are composed using layers of canvas. Additional features, including stage props, were also made through adaption from photographs.

Hibernacula: Batcall
Ryan Burns

Ryan Burns’ drive is to understand how society can better understand our relationship with the natural world. This inspired him to create a sculptural bat house that addresses current threats to bats not only in Washington state, but also nationally. Installed next to an open lawn that bats find ideal for hunting, Burns repurposed an old public phone box cover to house a wooden bat box, which is adorned with stenciled objects that reference Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) and medical imagery. Burns has experience with bats and has observed their timid nature; if threatened, bats react as mice do, by hiding or staying hidden. To ensure the safety and comfort of the bats, Burns worked with the Seattle Parks and Recreation’s ecologist, and the bat box conforms with International Bat Coalition standards. The bat box is mounted independently within the phone box so it can easily be unbolted and relocated to the Bats Northwest’s preserve in Lynnwood at the end of Art Interruptions. 

Sea Creature Scavenger Hunt
Maria Jost

Inspiring people to look more deeply at their surroundings, Maria Jost created an interactive organism scavenger hunt along the Greenway and Connector Trail. She encourages people of all ages, on foot or bicycles, to scan the surroundings for intricately patterned sea creatures placed strategically throughout the area. Using watercolor and digital collage transferred to a vinyl utility box wrap, Jost created a surreal undersea landscape that includes rocks, kelp, and aquatic plants, but is devoid of larger organisms like fish and marine invertebrates. A checklist with silhouetted images and an accompanying website encourages viewers to search for the six missing organisms, which are scattered along the Greenway and Connector Trail and may be found on the back of street signs, on other metal boxes, or in other locations.

Goats of Many Colors
Tia Matthies

With the hope of inspiring feelings of surprise, delight, and thoughts of cultures from around the world, Tia Matthies created a small herd of goats. Created from one-inch plywood and varying in size, the five two-dimensional goats resemble cut-out illustrations. The artist painted the goats with exterior house paint in bright colors and designed them to appear as though they are grazing. Matthies hopes to inspire deeper thought on what these goats mean to various populations here in our city and around the world, symbolizing our fascination with small urban farms and expanding feelings of community. 

Smelting
Akira Ohiso

Akira Ohiso’s art installation brings attention to the history of the river as a fertile fishery for the Duwamish Native tribe. The shallow banks of Longfellow Creek once supported smelt, but they slowly disappeared with the Industrial Revolution and the subsequent proliferation of chemicals and toxic waste. Ohiso created drawings of native smelt – in red, yellow, black, and blue – that were then digitally printed onto white windsocks to create fish kites. In the artist’s Japanese culture, fish kites (Koinobori) are flown on poles to celebrate an annual national Children’s Day – symbolizing hope for a healthy and prosperous future for children. This year also marks the 75th anniversary of the Japanese-American internment camps, adding poignancy to the installation.

Orange you glad for green? Yes, I pink so
Shawn Parks

Shawn Parks’ inspiration is the surreal horizontal stripes of spring tulip bloom colors in the Skagit Valley. The artist’s concept interrupts the viewer’s experience throughout the Greenway with shocks of brightly colored artwork in shapes and textures resembling pine tree needles, bamboo stalks, grass, and ivy ground covers. Parks created the artworks using materials originally designed for construction and sport use in outdoor environments, including marking whiskers, marking flags, and flagger tapes. The artist ’ worked with a Seattle Department of Transportation arborist to identify the best trees and sites along the Greenway for the installations. These varied sections of bright color appear at multiple heights for viewers to notice – whether traveling on foot, bicycle, or by car – and to bring joy and happiness to passersby.

Check out temporary art in Rainier Valley and Seattle Center before they’re gone

Art Interruptions along the Rainier Valley Neighborhood Greenway and Seattle Center Sculpture Walk On view now through January 3, 2017

Temporary art by 14 artists has popped up along Rainier Valley and at Seattle Center this fall. Ranging from whimsical and conceptual, to comical and topical. Don’t miss three opportunities to talk to the artists and tour the work:

Seattle Center Sculpture Walk Tour
Thursday, September 15, 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Seattle Center, Next 50 Pavilion
305 Harrison street Seattle, WA 98109

The tour will start at the Next 50 Pavilion, and ends in the Armory where guests, 21 and up, can participate in Seattle’s Best Damn Happy Hour featuring a no-host bar and specials from the Armory restaurants.

Seattle Mini Maker Faire
Saturday, September 17, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
EMP Museum
325 5th Ave. N. Seattle, WA 98109

Artist Loreen Matsushima we be on site creating the second installation of her artwork Redacting the Skyline.

Kick off Feet First’s WALKTOBER with a Walk for Fun event
Saturday, October 1, 2016, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Explore the SE Seattle neighborhood by foot, and experience Art Interruptions and meet the participating artists along the new Rainier Valley Greenway on October 1. WALKTOBER is hosted by Feet First and encourages people in Washington to explore their surroundings by walking for fun, walking to work, and walking to school during the month of October. http://www.feetfirst.org/event/walktober-walk-your-world?instance_id=7465

2016 Art Interruptions

Art Interruptions, an annual temporary art program created by the Office of Arts & Culture in partnership with the Seattle Department of Transportation, will offer ephemeral moments of surprise and reflection in the Rainer Valley East-West Neighborhood Greenway. This area includes: New Holly, Othello, Brighton, Lakewood and Seward Park.  Beginning September, seven temporary installations on view in the greenway will inspire and enliven the route with an element of the unexpected. Art Interruptions is funded by Seattle Department of Transportation 1% for Art funds.

The artworks range from street sign paintings to a collage fabricated entirely out of aluminum soda cans. The seven selected artists include Ruben David, Melissa Koch, Vikram Madan, Ulises Mariscal, Kemba N. Opio, little talia, and Junko Yamamoto. This year, six of the selected artists participated in the 2016 Public Art Boot Camp, a free two-day intensive basic training overview offered by the Office of Arts & Culture’s Public Art Program offered to artists who are ready to translate their exhibition experience to the public realm.

2016 Seattle Center Sculpture Walk

This fall the 2016 Seattle Center Sculpture Walk will transform the Seattle Center Campus with eight art spectacles that will change the way visitors experience the Center grounds. Artworks range from sculptural and conceptual, to comical and surprising with an element of grandeur. The 2016 Seattle Center Sculpture Walk features the works of artists Laura Buchan, Minh Carrico, Satpreet Kahlon, Edward Key, Terrell Lozada, Loreen Matsushima, Steven Markussen, and artist team Suzanne Morlock and Glenn Messersmith. All of the artists participated in the Office of Arts & Culture’s Public Art Boot Camp. Seattle Center Sculpture Walk is made possible through Seattle Center and the Office of Arts & Culture.

How will you Celebrate Neighbor Appreciation Day on February 14?

Neighbor Appreciation Day is coming up on Saturday, February 14.  Need ideas to celebrate?  Here are a few!

  1. Organize a neighborhood clean up. You can contact your Neighborhood District Coordinator for supplies.
  2. Host a potluck
  3. Go for a walk with your neighbor. Feet First and Seattle Department of Transportation have walking maps.
  4. Have a book exchange or clothing exchange
  5. Organize a SNAP meeting

For Neighborhood Appreciation Day events in your neighborhood, check our calendar at: http://www.seattle.gov/Neighborhoods/neighborday/

Celebrate Neighbor Appreciation Day Early by Joining Feet First for Stairway Walks Day

On Saturday, February 7 from 10:00am to 12:00pm, join Feet First for its Third Annual Stairway Walks Day. This event features 14 simultaneous walks across the region, which celebrate the legacy of several hundred publicly accessible stairways.

Feet First Neighborhood Walking Ambassadors will lead 450 participants along several of the region’s most impressive stairways, collectively traversing up and down more than 100,000 steps. The stairway routes featured on Stairway Walks Day are from Cathy and Jake Jaramillo’s book Seattle Stairway Walks: An Up-and-Down Guide to City Neighborhoods.

Urban explorers are invited to join one of 14 guided walks in the following Seattle neighborhoods:

Alki
Deadhorse Canyon & Rainier Beach
Downtown: City Hall to Pike Place
Eastlake, North Capitol Hill & Portage Bay
Fauntleroy & Morgan Junction
Fremont
Longfellow Creek & Pigeon Point
Madrona & Leschi
Mount Baker
Ravenna
South Magnolia
Southwest Queen Anne; The Olmstead Vision; University of Washington

Space is limited to 35 people per walk. Pl ease RSVP in advance at www.f eetfirst.org or http://stairwaywalksday2015.bpt.me/.

For more information about Stairway Walks Day, contact George Shen by emailing georgerafeetfirst.org or calling 206-652-2310, ext. 4.

Feet First Celebrates Third Annual Stairway Walks Day

 

A Great Way to Celebrate Neighbor Appreciation Day Early!

On Saturday, February 7, from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm, join Feet First for the Third Annual Stairway Walks Day. This event features fourteen simultaneous walks across the region, which celebrate the legacy of several hundred publicly accessible stairways.

Feet First Neighborhood Walking Ambassadors will lead 450 participants along several of the region’s most impressive stairways, collectively traversing up and down more than 100,000 steps. The stairway routes featured on Stairway Walks Day are from Cathy and Jake Jaramillo’s book Seattle Stairway Walks: An Up-and-Down Guide to City Neighborhoods. The book is intended to help urban adventurers appreciate the many stairways that make up the vivid fabric of our neighborhoods, and their connection to local greenspaces, history, art, and architecture.

To RSVP go to http://stairwaywalksday2015.bpt.me/ or at www.feetfirst.org. Space is limited to 35 people per walk.

Urban explorers are invited to join one of fourteen guided neighborhood walks in the following Seattle neighborhoods:  Alki; Deadhorse Canyon & Rainier Beach; Downtown: City Hall to Pike Place; Eastlake, North Capitol Hill  & Portage Bay; Fauntleroy & Morgan Junction;  Fremont;  Longfellow Creek & Pigeon Point; Madrona & Leschi; Mount Baker; Ravenna; South Magnolia; Southwest Queen Anne; The Olmstead Vision; University of Washington

For more information about Stairway Walks Day, please contact George Shen by emailing george@feetfirst.info or calling 206-652-2310, ex t. 4.