Arts in Parks returns to Seattle Parks this summer

Events and art installations June through November 2018

Now in its third year, Arts in Parks, a partnership between Seattle Parks and Recreation and the Office of Arts & Culture, is offering a number of free events and temporary art projects that will activate community parks this summer. From June through November 2018 Seattleites and visitors will be treated to events for the whole family, from Shakespeare In The Park to Paint and Smoothies. There is something for everyone this summer! For more information and a calendar guide about the events visit here. Check out the Arts in Parks 2018 brochure for events and art installations at a park near you.

Arts in Parks supports 38 events through $205,000 invested in the community through grants and temporary public art projects. The Arts in Parks program invests in new and established community festivals, art happenings and music concerts that enliven Seattle parks by promoting arts and culture, celebrating our diversity, building community connections and energizing parks while connecting with underserved communities.

Programs include events, series, public art installations, and family-friendly kid centered activities in neighborhood parks throughout the northeast, northwest, central, southeast and southwest regions.

Highlights include: 

Six Walls at Pritchard Park: An art installation at Pritchard Island Beach made of six freestanding gallery walls that will display the work of local Black artists. Participants are asked to bring one piece of their own artwork to drop-off points across the city; the first 25 artists will have their work shown. This project hopes to provide a welcoming space for Black artists to show their work. Created by artist Khadija Tarver. 

TUFFEST: This annual festival presented by TUF is a celebration of visual art and music with the addition of educational workshops. The event centers marginalized communities, including people of color, women, and trans and gender-nonconforming folks. 

ANiMA: a cultural event celebrating ancestry and heritage through interactive, multimedia performances and storytelling. Artists perform original music with live projected animation, shadow dancing and puppetry with an invocation led by Korean drumming group Olleam, community activist group Sahngnoksoo and LQ Lion Dance. This event will occur during the Chinese Hungry Ghost Festival, a time of paying homage to ancestors that are believed to visit the living during this time.

Theater for Young Children: Performances and music from Latin America, written for ages 3-9 and fun for all.

Creating a Roadmap to Becoming a 100% Renewable Energy and Carbon Neutral City

OSE is embarking on funded 100% Renewable Cities Project, a three-year effort to develop equity-centered climate strategies with members of the Environmental Justice Committee and the community. OSE is partnering with Puget Sound Sage, SDOT and City Light in this work. Actions will focus on reducing climate emissions by transitioning to fossil fuel-free heating & hot water, increasing efficiency, electrifying transportation & reducing VMT, and expanding solar and other renewables. A potential initial priority for the group is developing a residential roadmap to achieve carbon neutrality in residential buildings by 2050.

With a generous grant from the Kresge Foundation, Puget Sound Sage is partnering with the City to work with the community to co-create a roadmap to become a 100% renewable energy and carbon neutral city. The City/Community collaboration will work to 1) embed equity in the policies and programs developed to implement the Mayor’s climate agenda and 2) design a roadmap to fully transition Seattle to an equitable, renewable, and carbon-neutral energy future.

Mayor Durkan recently released an updated Climate Action Strategy, a suite of actions designed to significantly reduce GHG emissions from the buildings and transportation sectors, Seattle’s largest sources of emissions. The overarching strategy is to transition these sectors to Seattle City Light’s clean and carbon neutral electricity. The Equity and Environment Agenda includes a suite of process and outcome recommendations to embed equity in the city’s environmental work and creates the foundation for advancing equity through climate action.

Fresh Bucks helping Casa Latina clients eat healthier

Clients at Casa Latina recently had front row seats to a live cooking class as they learned about healthy, affordable meals on a budget. And now, buying fruits and vegetables to make healthy meals for their families just got easier thanks to a partnership between Casa Latina and the Fresh Bucks program.

The Fresh Bucks program is working with Casa Latina to provide Fresh Bucks vouchers for Casa Latina clients to buy high-quality, local produce from any of the 33 farmers markets or six neighborhood grocery stores participating in the Fresh Bucks program in Seattle and King County.

Casa Latina, an immigrant worker rights organization, empowers low-wage Latino immigrants with knowledge and resources to achieve their goals. Araceli Hernandez, Director of Day Worker Center at Casa Latina says, “Our clients face a number of barriers when it comes to accessing federal resources and we work to identify and address gaps— such as food insecurity—that are disproportionally affecting our community. Partnering with the Fresh Bucks program gives our clients the ability to choose healthy foods, regardless of income.”

This year, Fresh Bucks is serving more shoppers by expanding the program from EBT/SNAP (food stamp) recipients to also providing the benefit to families who may not meet the federal requirements for food assistance programs, but still face hardships when it comes covering their food expenses. This expansion is made possible through funding from the City of Seattle Sweetened Beverage Tax.

“This program allows me to stretch my dollar,” said a program participant. “Buying fresh fruits and vegetables can be expensive, but with this support, I can now regularly visit the farmers market to get my produce, and the kids love going too. I want to teach them what I’ve learned about cooking with fresh ingredients.”

Shoppers can use Fresh Bucks at 33 farmers markets in Seattle and King County, as well as six, ethnic grocery stores open year-round. To find participating locations or to find out more about the Fresh Bucks program, visit the Fresh Bucks website.

National Endowment for the Arts Art Works grant of $100,000 awarded to Seattle Public Schools for The Creative Advantage

Grant to support The Creative Advantage, a citywide initiative to establish equitable access to arts education 

National Endowment for the Arts Chairman Jane Chu has approved more than $80 million in grants as part of the National Endowment for the ARTS (NEA) second major funding announcement for fiscal year 2018.  Included in this announcement is an Art Works grant of $100,000 to Seattle Public Schools to support implementation of The Creative Advantage.

The Art Works category is the NEA’s largest funding category and supports projects that focus on the creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence, public engagement with diverse and excellent art, lifelong learning in the arts, and/or the strengthening of communities through the arts.

The Creative Advantage is a citywide initiative to establish equitable access to arts education for every student Seattle Public Schools. It is a collective partnership between Seattle Public Schools, the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture, The Seattle Foundation, Seattle Art Museum, Arts Corps, ArtsEd Washington, and up to 100 community-based arts organizations.

Since 2008, the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture (ARTS) and SPS have collaborated to increase high-quality arts learning in high-need schools. The Seattle K-12 Arts Plan was created to address inequities in access to art education and provide a comprehensive, sequential and predictable arts education for all students. To realize the plan, The Creative Advantage was born. It solidifies the collective impact partnership between SPS and ARTS as the “backbone” management structure with The Seattle Foundation as the fiscal agent and high leverage partners to support essential goals of the arts plan.

The Creative Advantage has completed research, planning and mission alignment to develop the Seattle K-12 Arts Plan, which includes regional and school-based planning, increased certified arts staff, 21st century arts learning that is culturally responsive, arts partnerships, professional development for arts and non-arts teachers and arts partners and a comprehensive evaluation.

The Creative Advantage has restored arts access to the Central Arts Pathway (CAP), which includes 13 schools with 6,475 students; the South-southwest Arts Pathway (SWAP), which includes 10 schools with 4,552 students; and launched in the entire Southeast Arts Region (SEAR), which includes 21 schools with 10,208 students.

ARTS announces the inaugural exhibition at King Street Station, yəhaw’, opening winter 2018

Call for Indigenous Creatives, open March 5 – April 20, 2018

 

SEATTLE – In recognition of the Coast Salish peoples on whose land the City of Seattle is built, the Office of Arts & Culture is honored to open a new arts and cultural hub on the third floor of King Street Station this winter with the inaugural Indigenous-centered exhibition yəhaw̓. The title of the exhibition, yəhaw̓, is drawn from the Coast Salish story of Native people from all tribes uniting around a common cause and lifting up the sky together. In the spirit of the story, this exhibition will celebrate the depth and diversity of Indigenous art made in the Pacific Northwest.

King Street Station. Seattle, Washington.
ZGF Architects
© Benjamin Benschneider All rights Reserved. Usage rights may be arranged by contacting Benjamin Benschneider Photography. Email: bbenschneider@comcast.net or phone 206-789-5973

Reflecting on the Lifting the Sky story and the use of Indigenous language in the exhibition title, Puyallup tribal member Tami Hohn shared, “Our ancestors left us the gift of our traditional knowledge and beliefs by preserving our language. Using our language throughout our communities and projects, such as this, honors what our ancestors have done and keeps our language alive.” Tami is a Southern Lushootseed curriculum developer for the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe and has worked with the language for 25 years. Vi Hilbert’s telling of the Lifting the Sky story as part of the Spring Revels, can be viewed at http://bela.music.washington.edu/ethno/hilbert/voicesVideo.html

In preparation for the exhibition, curators Tracy Rector (Seminole/Choctaw), Asia Tail (Cherokee Nation), and Satpreet Kahlon opened a call for artwork in any media by Indigenous creatives living in the Pacific Northwest. All Indigenous creatives who apply will be included in the exhibition. The exhibition will be a collective portrait of Native America, including creatives of all ages and stages in their careers, from many tribal affiliations, working in a variety of creative mediums. yəhaw̓ celebrates all Native makers, and actively challenges the false divides between fine art and craft, Urban and Reservation, contemporary and traditional. For more information, including guidelines, eligibility, and the application please visit yehawshow.com

“When we open this winter, King Street Station will reflect our unique city, and hopefully become a national model for how arts and culture can support a truly equitable society, empowering individuals, artists, and organizations,” says Randy Engstrom, ARTS Director. “Opening the space with an exhibition that centers and celebrates Indigenous voices is an honor for our office and the first of many exhibitions and programs that will reflect our diverse Seattle community.”

The arts hub at King Street Station will be a new kind of space in which communities of color have increased opportunities to present their work, and be seen and heard. Grounded in community feedback, the programming and cultural space of King Street Station will be an incubator for artists and communities, experimenting with the best ways to respond to community needs in an ever-changing city. ARTS’ goal for King Street Station is to be a resource for the city and the embodiment of the Office’s commitment to racial equity.