Grab a copy of our Community Resource Guidebook

Seattle is a bustling and quickly growing city, and sometimes finding the resources and services you need can feel overwhelming.

That’s why we created the Community Resource Hub, our online one-stop-shop for City resources and information. But, we also know that online isn’t for everyone and sometimes we all just want something to hold in our hand and dog ear and doodle and make notes in.

So, we created the Community Resource Guidebook, our friendly 32-page handbook that will help you make sharing ideas, finding information, connecting with your community, and accessing City resources that much easier!

Feel free to print out our online PDF or drop us an email if you want a hard copy sent to you in the mail. Just send an email to sam.read@seattle.gov.

If you own a business or manage a public space and think these guides would be beneficial to your community, let us know and we can arrange for you to pick up a stack.

The post Grab a copy of our Community Resource Guidebook appeared first on Front Porch.

Want a quick overview of Seattle government? Check out our new videos!

Here at Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, we are constantly striving to make it easier for you to get the information and resources you need to navigate city government and connect with your community.

Whether you’re a newcomer or a longtime Seattleite, your voice and your contribution to the city are valuable. So, we created a new video series to help you better understand our local government and how you can get plugged in to make positive impacts in your community.

 

GET TO KNOW YOUR CITY

The first video, Get to Know Your City, illuminates the basics of City of Seattle government: how it works, who does what, and how Seattle Department of Neighborhoods can help you navigate it all.

Espanol | Tiếng Việt | 简体中文 | 繁體中文 | af Soomaali | Tagalog

 

GET CONNECTED

The second video, Get Connected, breaks down all the ways that you can connect with your community and the City to get information, solve problems, and get involved.

Espanol | Tiếng Việt | 简体中文 | 繁體中文 | af Soomaali | Tagalog

 

MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD

In our third video, Make Your Voice Heard, we let you know how, in ways both big and small, you can make your voice heard on issues and projects you care about! Whether you want to provide public comment, get involved on a board or commission, or build the skills you need to become a civic leader, we want to make it as easy as possible for you to get engaged and use your voice.

Espanol | Tiếng Việt | 简体中文 | 繁體中文 | af Soomaali | Tagalog

 

The post Want a quick overview of Seattle government? Check out our new videos! appeared first on Front Porch.

Share your thoughts on Early Community Outreach for Design Review

We’ve heard from communities that earlier outreach around development for new multifamily homes and other buildings would improve how Seattle handles new growth. To that end, Seattle Department of Neighborhoods (DON) and Seattle Department of Construction and Inspections (SDCI) have partnered on developing SDCI Director’s Rule 4-2018/DON 1-2018, Early Community Outreach for Design Review.

The proposed rule expands on a new requirement that all projects going through Design Review must conduct community outreach before beginning the early design guidance (EDG) process. It establishes:

  • what constitutes a community outreach plan, and
  • how to document compliance with the community outreach requirements.

The proposed rule builds on a staff draft that was shared in August 2017, to coincide with Seattle City Council’s deliberation on the Design Review legislation.

Background

The new requirement for early community outreach was adopted by City Council as part of Ordinance No. 125429 in October 2017. It will go into effect on July 1, 2018.

Other changes to the Design Review program that will go into effect on July 1 include changes to the thresholds that determine which projects are required to go through Design Review and what type of Design Review would be required. Read a summary of the changes here.

With this Rule, we expect to see early engagement between neighbors and developers, but before it moves forward, we’d like to hear your thoughts.

Information Available

For more information about the changes to the Design Review program that were adopted in October 2017, please visit SDCI’s project webpage and the City Clerk’s webpage for Council Bill 119057.

We’ve also put together some Examples of Community Outreach Plans for Design Review as a resource to help applicants understand the requirements in the proposed Rule.

For more information about the Design Review program, please visit: http://www.seattle.gov/dpd/aboutus/whoweare/designreview/program

How to Comment

If you want to provide feedback on the proposed Director’s Rule, please submit your comments in writing by Friday, May 21st via email at SCI_DRulesComments@seattle.gov or postal mail at:

Director
Department of Construction and Inspections
700 5th Avenue, Suite 2000
P.O. Box 34019
Seattle, WA  98124-4019

Contact

For general questions about the proposed Director’s Rule, you may also contact:

For questions about how the new requirements in the proposed Director’s Rule may impact a specific development project, contact:

  • Lisa Rutzick, SDCI, at 206-386-9049 or lisa.rutzick@seattle.gov

 

Once the Director’s Rule is finalized, Seattle Department of Neighborhoods will host a publicly accessible web page with resources and will provide staff support to developers around Early Community Outreach for Design Review.

The post Share your thoughts on Early Community Outreach for Design Review appeared first on Front Porch.

Get Engaged Hot Sheet: April 3 – 10

We want to make it as easy as possible for you to get involved in your City and your community!

Here are 5 things you can do this week to GET ENGAGED!

 

Share Your Thoughts on the City of Seattle’s Free Floating Bike-Share Program: Seattle was the 1st city in North America to pilot free-floating bike share. Take a survey from Seattle Department of Transportation & tell them what’s working, what’s not, and how they can improve it.

 

Be a Voice for Renters in Seattle by Joining the Seattle Renters’ Commission (SRC): The SRC consists of people living in an array of rental housing types, to include students, low-income renters, LGBTQ renters, people with past felony convictions, people in subsidized housing, and those who have experienced homelessness. Applications due April 12.

 

Help Redesign Rainier Ave S and Upgrade Bus Service: As soon as 2021, King County Metro Route 7 will be upgraded to RapidRide. Participate in an online open house to learn more about RapidRide service, proposed bus stop changes, possible design changes to Rainier Ave S and S Henderson St, and how RapidRide can help enhance transit and safety in the Rainier corridor. Online open house closes April 8.

 

Join the Community Police Commission: Help amplify and build common ground among communities affected by policing in Seattle and champion policing practices centered in justice and equity. Applications due April 12.

 

Organize a Spring Clean Event in Your Neighborhood: Spring Clean runs from April 1 through May 31. During this time, Seattle residents come together to keep Seattle clean and vibrant. Activities include picking up litter, stenciling storm drains to prevent water pollution, painting out graffiti, and removing invasive plants. Seattle Public Utilities supports volunteers by providing free tools. Register your event online or call 206.233.7187 to receive City support.

 

BONUS:

Start Your Own Community Emergency Hub: Apply for a Community Emergency Hub-in-a-Box and get the essential materials and supplies your community would need in case of a disaster! Applications are due April 16.

The post Get Engaged Hot Sheet: April 3 – 10 appeared first on Front Porch.

Read our 2017 Annual Report

Message from Kathy Nyland, Director of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods

2017 was quite the year. It was the first full year since the Department of Neighborhoods was charged with leading a citywide effort to advance more equitable outreach and engagement practices and foster more inclusive and efficient government processes.  To say that it was a busy year would be an understatement. To say it was successful doesn’t feel adequate. It was so much more than that. 2017 was exhausting and exhilarating; it was intentional and inspirational; and it was creative and innovative.

Operating with an equity lens, we were mindful of the work we do and how we do it. We were constantly reminded about the WHY. Why do we do the work we do? The answer is simple: it is because of you – the people we work with and the people we work for.

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods 2017 Annual Report

We strive to strengthen Seattle by engaging all communities. We do this by fostering community partnerships, cultivating emerging leadership, and facilitating community inclusiveness. Outreach and engagement is the core of what we do, and equity and transparency are our guiding principles. We hope you see that in our annual report.

Our work is about people and that is the focus of this report. It is a snapshot to show you what we are doing and how people are responding. As this was our first full year leading  this drive toward equity and inclusion, the data is still relatively new, but the patterns and trends are encouraging.

Here are just a few highlights:

Read the full Seattle Department of Neighborhoods 2017 Annual Report.

We believe that successfully engaging the community in process increases the likelihood of public support and better outcomes. By aligning our outreach and engagement efforts we are able to develop more authentic partnerships among community members and stakeholders and better effect change throughout the city.

This report is for you and because of you. Thank you for your interest, your time, and for being part of the solution.


Kathy Nyland

 

The post Read our 2017 Annual Report appeared first on Front Porch.