Arts in Parks returns to Seattle Parks this summer

Events and art installations June through November 2018

Now in its third year, Arts in Parks, a partnership between Seattle Parks and Recreation and the Office of Arts & Culture, is offering a number of free events and temporary art projects that will activate community parks this summer. From June through November 2018 Seattleites and visitors will be treated to events for the whole family, from Shakespeare In The Park to Paint and Smoothies. There is something for everyone this summer! For more information and a calendar guide about the events visit here. Check out the Arts in Parks 2018 brochure for events and art installations at a park near you.

Arts in Parks supports 38 events through $205,000 invested in the community through grants and temporary public art projects. The Arts in Parks program invests in new and established community festivals, art happenings and music concerts that enliven Seattle parks by promoting arts and culture, celebrating our diversity, building community connections and energizing parks while connecting with underserved communities.

Programs include events, series, public art installations, and family-friendly kid centered activities in neighborhood parks throughout the northeast, northwest, central, southeast and southwest regions.

Highlights include: 

Six Walls at Pritchard Park: An art installation at Pritchard Island Beach made of six freestanding gallery walls that will display the work of local Black artists. Participants are asked to bring one piece of their own artwork to drop-off points across the city; the first 25 artists will have their work shown. This project hopes to provide a welcoming space for Black artists to show their work. Created by artist Khadija Tarver. 

TUFFEST: This annual festival presented by TUF is a celebration of visual art and music with the addition of educational workshops. The event centers marginalized communities, including people of color, women, and trans and gender-nonconforming folks. 

ANiMA: a cultural event celebrating ancestry and heritage through interactive, multimedia performances and storytelling. Artists perform original music with live projected animation, shadow dancing and puppetry with an invocation led by Korean drumming group Olleam, community activist group Sahngnoksoo and LQ Lion Dance. This event will occur during the Chinese Hungry Ghost Festival, a time of paying homage to ancestors that are believed to visit the living during this time.

Theater for Young Children: Performances and music from Latin America, written for ages 3-9 and fun for all.

Public art projects honored by Americans for the Arts Public Art Network Year in Review

Americans for the Arts honored 49 outstanding public arts projects created in 2017 through the Public Art Network Year in Review program, the only national program that specifically recognizes the most compelling public art. Chosen by public art experts, the roster of selected projects include three from Seattle’s Public Art Program.

The three projects that were recognized are:

Vessels by Nicole Kistler: Vessels are a series of cast iron sculptures that dot the community garden on Seattle Public Utilities property at Beacon Reservoir. Building on the inspiration of the reservoir as a container, they evoke puffball mushrooms holding spores, berries holding seeds, seed pods, and ceramic water jugs. The sculptures also hold stories from the community. Kistler interviewed Beacon Food Forest volunteers and neighbors over several summer months capturing food stories and traditions on audio and imbedded phrases into the permanent works. Commissioned with Seattle Public Utilities 1% for Art Funds.

BorderLands: The first exhibition ARTS organized at King Street Station, BorderLands featured 2D- and 3D works from the City’s collection as well as site-specific installations. The exhibition, focusing on themes of belonging and resistance, was on view on the third floor of King Street Station.

Poetry on Buses, a collaboration with 4Culture and funded through Seattle Public Utilities 1% for Art funds: Poetry on Buses invited King County residents to create, share, and experience poetry on public transit, online, and in community on the theme “Your Body of Water.”

Dating back to 1992, Poetry on Buses was reimagined in 2014 to foster relationships with immigrant and undeserved communities, featured multiple languages, and transformed the commute for culture—on bus and on smartphone. The 2017-18 program was multi-modal and featured poetry in nine languages.

“The best of public art can challenge, delight, educate, and illuminate. Most of all, public art creates a sense of civic vitality in the cities, towns, and communities we inhabit and visit,” said Robert L. Lynch, president and CEO of Americans for the Arts. “As these Public Art Network Year in Review selections illustrate, public art has the power to enhance our lives on a scale that little else can. I congratulate the artists and commissioning groups for these community treasures, and I look forward to honoring more great works in the years to come.”

The projects selected for Year in Review can be viewed on this page and were on display throughout the Annual Convention. Three independent public art experts—Bryan Lee, Jr., director of design at Colloqate Design in New Orleans; Karen Mack, executive director of LA Commons in Los Angeles; and Denver artist Patrick Marold—discussed the trends they uncovered while examining hundreds of submissions in selecting this year’s choices for the most exemplary, innovative permanent or temporary public art works created or debuted in 2017. This is the 17th year that Americans for the Arts has recognized public art works.

Americans for the Arts is the leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education in America. With offices in Washington, D.C., and New York City, it has a record of more than 55 years of service. Americans for the Arts is dedicated to representing and serving local communities and creating opportunities for every American to participate in and appreciate all forms of the arts. Additional information is available at www.AmericansForTheArts.org.

 

ARTS releases the King Street Station Community Feedback Report

Community feedback is being used to inform the programming at King Street Station

 

SEATTLE – The Seattle Office of Arts & Culture (ARTS) announced the release of the King Street Station Community Feedback Report. The report represents over 500 individuals and encompasses their thoughts, dreams and ideas on how to program a new arts and cultural hub at King Street Station with the goal of realizing tangible impacts in race and social justice. ARTS is using the information gathered from the community to create an innovative programming model for King Street Station. The goal of King Street Station is to increase opportunities for communities of color to present their work.

King Street Station will be a dedicated cultural space and provide public access to presentation and creative spaces, ARTS staff and resources, space for city convenings, and professional development, meeting space and other services that were requested through the outreach process. ARTS is planning to open King Street Station in fall 2018.

In 2016, ARTS engaged in an inclusive, city-wide outreach effort to hear from the community about their needs. Throughout the year ARTS conducted three public listening sessions and hosted 16 focus groups focusing on voices of people of color including Latinx – Hispanic, Asian, Asian American and Asian Pacific Islander, African, African American and Black, and Native artists.

The report is divided into four themes, racial equity and inclusion, art that reflects the city, strengthening Seattle’s creative economy by supporting artists, and community ownership that promotes accessibility. Each section outlines community feedback and opportunities to address these issues.

The feedback report will directly inform the programming model and while not all of the ideas in the report are within ARTS scope it provides the city with an incredible opportunity to create a nimble and flexible model that can address the needs of the community. The information gathered in this report will not only inform the programming model for King Street Station, it will also help inform how racial equity and social justice is manifest throughout ARTS’ work.

Image: August 10, 2016 King Street Station public meeting photo by Sunita Martini

ARTS releases the King Street Station Community Feedback Report

Community feedback is being used to inform the programming at King Street Station

 

SEATTLE – The Seattle Office of Arts & Culture (ARTS) announced the release of the King Street Station Community Feedback Report. The report represents over 500 individuals and encompasses their thoughts, dreams and ideas on how to program a new arts and cultural hub at King Street Station with the goal of realizing tangible impacts in race and social justice. ARTS is using the information gathered from the community to create an innovative programming model for King Street Station. The goal of King Street Station is to increase opportunities for communities of color to present their work.

King Street Station will be a dedicated cultural space and provide public access to presentation and creative spaces, ARTS staff and resources, space for city convenings, and professional development, meeting space and other services that were requested through the outreach process. ARTS is planning to open King Street Station in fall 2018.

In 2016, ARTS engaged in an inclusive, city-wide outreach effort to hear from the community about their needs. Throughout the year ARTS conducted three public listening sessions and hosted 16 focus groups focusing on voices of people of color including Latinx – Hispanic, Asian, Asian American and Asian Pacific Islander, African, African American and Black, and Native artists.

The report is divided into four themes, racial equity and inclusion, art that reflects the city, strengthening Seattle’s creative economy by supporting artists, and community ownership that promotes accessibility. Each section outlines community feedback and opportunities to address these issues.

The feedback report will directly inform the programming model and while not all of the ideas in the report are within ARTS scope it provides the city with an incredible opportunity to create a nimble and flexible model that can address the needs of the community. The information gathered in this report will not only inform the programming model for King Street Station, it will also help inform how racial equity and social justice is manifest throughout ARTS’ work.

Image: August 10, 2016 King Street Station public meeting photo by Sunita Martini

Ethnic Artist Roster expands

Mini Murals / Vikram Madan
Seattle, Sept 2016
Photo: Mark Woods

The Seattle Office of Arts & Culture (ARTS) has updated and expanded the Ethnic Artist Roster. The roster is a is a diverse list of artists of color who were selected through a panel process for exhibition opportunities in city owned or affiliated galleries. ARTS created the roster to support the City of Seattle’s Race and Social Justice Initiative (RSJI) by fostering dialogue about race, culture, gender and equity through diverse exhibitions by established and emerging regional artists.

In addition, the roster is available online, where it is a resource to anyone who is looking for artwork by artists of color or who wants to host a culturally relevant art exhibition. To contact an artist, please refer to their resume.