City of Seattle hires Chief Information Security Officer

Bryant Bradbury, CISO

The City of Seattle’s Chief Technology Officer Michael Mattmiller today announced the hire of Bryant Bradbury as the citywide Chief Information Security Officer.

“The Chief Information Security Officer is a very important role for the city, ensuring a secure computing environment that enables City staff to serve the public,” said Mattmiller. “Bryant has proven himself while serving in the role on an acting basis for the past year. His skills and knowledge are well-suited to continuing to serve the city in this role.”

“I’m honored to continue my work in information security at the City,” said Bradbury. “It’s my privilege to work in the Department of Information Technology as we realize innovations and keep information security and privacy at the forefront of the work we do as a city.”

Bradbury joined the Department of Information Technology in March 2013 as the Deputy Chief Information Security Officer. His work history in technology spans over 25 years, including private sector service in the insurance, commercial software, airline and air cargo industries and in public service starting with the City’s Fleets & Facilities Department in 2007.

DoIT manages creation and enforcement of policy, threat and vulnerability management, monitoring, incident response, and security-related compliance activities for the City. The Chief Information Security Officer position was created to oversee the citywide strategic efforts to properly protect the City’s information technology systems and the data associated with it.

Report highlights how Seattleites use technology

SEATTLE 5/23 At a launch event last night, the City of Seattle released new findings on technology access, adoption and interaction by Seattle residents. These findings are based on feedback from 2,600 residents via online and phone surveys and in-person focus groups in multiple languages about their use, concerns, and barriers to using the Internet, social media, cable TV and online government services.

“This data shows that we’re making great strides in technology, but a digital gap still exists between our neighbors,” said Mayor Ed Murray. “We’re already using the data in this report to influence how the City of Seattle interacts with our neighbors and to better target our outreach and engagement strategies.”

Every four years the City of Seattle conducts community research to find out how Seattle residents are using technology.The technology adoption study findings were detailed at the interactive launch event, and are available online at www.seattle.gov/tech/indicators. The summary of findings and recommendations are available in multiple languages.

“The continued rise of smart phone and tablet use provides outstanding opportunities for government to reach more residents,” said Councilmember Bruce Harrell, chair of the Council’s Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology Committee. “The information from the focus groups will help us improve services and how we reach all communities. We will take action on improving access to web services by making them available in multiple languages.”

Since 2000, the City’s Community Technology Program has been collecting extensive and statistically valid data on residential use of cable TV, broadband adoption and uses (including health, work, education, finance and civic engagement), barriers to broadband adoption, use of online city services, and customer service needs. The measures used were based on goals for a technology-healthy city developed in collaboration with the City’s volunteer Technology Advisory Board.

Nine focus groups were also conducted to help understand the needs of communities who are often under-represented in the online and phone surveys or may be technologically-underserved.

Findings of the report include:

  • The report finds that 85 percent of Seattle residents have Internet at home and that more residents now own laptops than desktop computers.
  • Since 2009, Seattle has seen mobile phone ownership grow by 11 percent (80 to 89 percent), and has seen a 66 percent growth in the number of residents with smart phones (35 to 58 percent).
  • Broadband and cable TV prices continue to be of concern, but increasing broadband speed is important to those surveyed, with high interest in using higher bandwidth applications.
  • Cable subscribership has dropped 13 percent in the past four years as options for viewing video over the internet have grown.
  • Lower income residents have lower-speed broadband service, though a broad cross section of Seattle residents are interested in using higher speed internet services for activities like medical appointments or taking classes.
  • The study funds that there is still a significant gap in access to internet and the skills to use it, though the digital equity gap is more focused in skills and uses of the internet than on basic access.
  • Email was noted as the preferred way for residents to give their opinion to a community group or the City.
  • Education and age are the most significant factors differentiating technology access and adoption, but the data also shows important differences based on the income, ethnicity, and abilities of those surveyed.
  • The research also found that those with less education tend to make less use of the internet than users with more education.

For more information, visit www.seattle.gov/tech/indicators or contact communitytechnology@seattle.gov or 206-386-9759.

Help guide City’s strategies and investments in technology

The City of Seattle is looking for volunteers to join the Citizens’ Telecommunications and Technology Advisory Board (CTTAB). The 10-member board and its committees help guide city strategies and investments in technology and telecommunications. We are currently looking for someone to fill one regular two-year position appointed by the Mayor and additional volunteer positions on committees of the Board.

CTTAB addresses broadband deployment and adoption, mobile and web based services for Seattle.gov, social media, open data, online public engagement, the Seattle Channel, cable TV franchise agreements, Technology Matching Fund grants and efforts to close the digital divide.

The City of Seattle promotes diversity in its boards and commissions. We encourage people with multicultural backgrounds or work experience to apply. We also encourage applications from those who have worked with a diverse population. You do not need to be a techie to care about Seattle’s digital future.

Applications are being accepted through April 3, 2014. Apply by sending your resume and a letter of interest to CommunityTechnology@seattle.gov. (PDFs or Word documents are preferred)

To be a Board member appointed by the Mayor or Council:

  • You must live or work in City of Seattle
  • This is a two-year appointment, potentially renewable for one additional term
  • Time commitment (Five-10 hours per month, depending upon activity)
  • Attendance at monthly meetings (the evening of the second Tuesday of each month)
  • Service to the board expected to begin May 13, 2014
  • Must participate in at least one CTTAB committee
  • Applicant must not be employed by the City of Seattle
  • Must not serve on more than one City of Seattle board or commission

Committee volunteer members have more flexibility in their term of service and who may be on a committee.


For questions email Community Technology or call Megan Coppersmith at 206-233-8736.