Community Garden, Wetland Planned for Former Delridge Substation

Volunteers remove blackberry plants from the former Duwamish Substation property during the 2016 Duwamish Alive event.

Seattle City Light, Delridge Neighborhoods Development Association, and Seattle Parks and Recreation are transforming a former Delridge substation into community green space with a community garden, wetland, and educational programs for students and adults on growing food and environmental stewardship.

“Delridge is a dynamic and diverse neighborhood that feels the pressure of urbanization. Longfellow Creek floods and salmon die from polluted stormwater runoff. What’s more we’re in a food desert with demonstrated lack of access to fresh food,” said Willard Brown, director of housing and environmental programs for the development association. “The Delridge Wetlands and Stewardship Project is our chance to help the neighborhood and provide things that the community wants and needs.”

Delridge Neighborhoods Development Association began working with Seattle City Light in 2015 when the 20,000-square-foot parcel was deemed surplus property to create a place that would provide access to fresh food, preserve a wetland, help control seasonal flooding and improve water quality in Longfellow Creek. Delridge Neighborhoods Development Association secured grant funding to purchase the property at fair market value for $80,000 and for design and restoration of the wetland.  Seattle Parks and Recreation will own the property. Delridge Neighborhoods Development Association will manage the site.

City Light laid the groundwork for the future community greenspace by removing contaminated soils. The utility also will remove the upper portions of six hazardous, diseased cottonwood trees in the 4,000-square-foot wetlands as part of the condition of transfer to Seattle Parks and Recreation. The cottonwoods will be converted to snags for wildlife habitat.

Brown is leading the charge for the property’s transformation and is bringing together the organizations that will transform the site. Students from K-8 STEM School at Louisa Boren, located two blocks from the site, and The Nature Consortium are working in the wetlands, removing invasive weeds, planting trees and learning firsthand how to care for the earth. A partnership with City Fruit and Tilth Alliance will bring a community orchard and garden to the former substation site. The Pomegranate Center, Outdoor Classroom Design and Gaynor Inc. are onboard to develop the site plan with community input this year.

 

City Light Continues Pole Replacement Work in March

Starting in mid-to-late March 2017, Seattle City Light will continue replacing aging utility poles in various parts of the utility’s service territory to improve and upgrade electrical reliability for customers.

Contracted crews will begin replacing poles in mid-to-late March 2017. The entire pole replacement project is anticipated for completion by the end of 2017.

City Light’s contractor, Magnum Power LLC, will be installing new utility poles, relocating wires and replacing aging equipment in various Seattle neighborhoods.  Work hours are scheduled from Mondays to Thursdays, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. This project is anticipated for completion by the end of 2017.

Maps of the construction work areas can be found on the utility’s construction website: 2017 Utility Pole Replacement Maps.

The new poles will be placed alongside pre-existing poles. They will meet standard heights and widths required for overhead power line construction. This may mean that poles in the area will be slightly taller and approximately two inches wider than existing poles.

Maintenance power outages are required for this work. Crews will place a door hanger or make personal contact within 48 to 72 hours of the outage date. The notification will specify the date, time and duration of the outage.

Once the electrical equipment is relocated, it may take several months before the other companies with utilities on the existing poles make their transfer(s). We will continue to monitor/coordinate these efforts as needed to facilitate the removal of old poles.

For more information, customers can contact:

Visit Seattle City Light’s Pole Replacement Project Website for the latest updates on this work. This website will be updated regularly as more utility pole locations are added.

City Light Continues Utility Pole Upgrades for Advanced Metering

In January 2017, Seattle City Light will continue supporting Advanced Metering services throughout the utility’s service territory by replacing existing utility poles with taller poles, which will host wireless utility data collection equipment. The new poles will be 70 feet tall, which is about 20 feet taller than the existing poles.

Rendering of wireless utility data equipment on a utility pole.

This project is part of the communications network to support Advanced Metering, which will automate meter reading and enable enhanced services.

Throughout the month of January 2017, City Light crews will be replacing poles in the following areas:

  • Beacon Hill / Rainier Vista (S Columbian Way)
  • West Seattle / Delridge  (16th Ave SW)
  • West Seattle / High Point (26th Ave SW)
  • West Seattle / North Admiral (45th Ave SW)
  • Central District (24th Ave)

View the January 2017 Utility Pole Upgrade maps for approximate construction work areas. More maps will be added on the Utility Pole Upgrade website as the project progresses into other areas within City Light’s service territory.

There are no maintenance power outages planned for this work. Some traffic and parking impacts are expected in the immediate work areas. Crews will be careful to maintain access to driveways.

Daily work hours are from Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. In most instances, the work to transfer existing equipment and install the data collection equipment can be completed in one day.

Customers can contact JoAnna Perley, Advanced Metering Deployment Manager at (206) 733-9648 or JoAnna.Perley@seattle.gov.


Visit the following websites for more information:

Seattle City Light’s “At Work in Your Neighborhood” website
www.seattle.gov/light/atwork

Seattle City Light’s Advanced Metering Program website
www.seattle.gov/light/meters

City Light to Replace Aging Utility Poles in Parts of Seattle and Burien

Seattle City Light is planning to replace aging utility poles in parts of Seattle and Burien to help improve and upgrade the electrical reliability in parts of the service territory. The installation of new poles, wire and equipment relocation is an important investment in infrastructure.

Starting in early to mid-May, Seattle City Light’s contractor, Magnum Power LLC, will be installing new utility poles, relocating wires to the new pole and replacing aging equipment in various Seattle and Burien neighborhoods. Work hours are scheduled from Mondays to Thursdays, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Maps of the construction work areas can be found here: 2016 Pole Replacement – South Location Maps

The new poles will be placed alongside pre-existing poles. They will meet standard heights and widths required for overhead power line construction. This may mean that poles in the area will be slightly taller and approximately two inches wider than existing poles.

Maintenance power outages are required for this work. Crews will place a door hanger or make personal contact within 48 to 72 hours of the outage date. The notification will specify the date, time and duration of the outage.

Once the electrical equipment is relocated, it may take several months before the other companies with utilities on the existing poles make their transfer(s). We will continue to monitor/coordinate these efforts as needed to facilitate the removal of old poles.

For more information, customers can contact:

Visit our construction website for the latest updates on this project: http://www.seattle.gov/light/atwork/release.asp?RN=356

City Seeking Confirmation of Priorities for the North Delridge Action Plan

The City of Seattle is collaborating with the North Delridge community to produce a shared vision and action plan to continue improving the health and equity of the Delridge neighborhood.

The City and community advisory committee have responded to community direction and produced a draft “Action Plan” for the North Delridge area. They are inviting the community to a meeting on Tuesday, September 29, 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. at the Delridge Community Center to:

  • Confirm community priorities for actions the City and community can take to create great community places along Delridge Way, address drainage and flooding, and increase access to healthy food, while making recreation, walking, biking, and taking transit an easier choice.
  • Help provide details for the Healthy Delridge Parks Vision that will identify how park facilities can support a healthy Delridge community.
  • Join forces with City staff and community organizations to identify the next steps for taking action.

Help shape the next steps we’ll take together to implement your vision for North Delridge at our workshop.

Tuesday, September 29, 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Delridge Community Center, 4501 Delridge Way SW
Light snacks and childcare will be provided.

Delridge is an area in West Seattle with a rich heritage that is home to diverse communities and organizations. Over the years, the residents of Delridge have worked with the City to create neighborhood assets such as the Youngstown Cultural Arts Center, Longfellow Creek Legacy Trail, Cottage Grove Park, the library, and affordable housing. Fifteen years ago, the Delridge community completed their neighborhood plan. Now there are new opportunities to seize and challenges to meet.

The North Delridge Action Plan team is collaborating with two other City projects, and will help direct their ongoing work. The Delridge Way SW Multimodal Corridor Study seeks to transform Delridge Way SW (from SW Roxbury St. to the West Seattle Bridge) into a safer and healthier public space with more predictable movements of people and goods. SPU is developing a Natural Drainage Systems (NDS) Partnership Program. This program will achieve the water quality goals identified in the Plan to Protect Seattle’s Waterways by working with sister agencies and community partners to deliver high-value neighborhood improvements.

Visit DPD’s Delridge site and sign up to receive updates.