City Council Confirms New Chief Technology Officer


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 7/21/2014

Councilmember Bruce Harrell

City Council Confirms New Chief Technology Officer

SEATTLECity Council unanimously approved Michael Mattmiller as Chief Technology Officer and Director of the Department of Information Technology (DoIT) today.

“Michael brings new energy and a fresh perspective to solving technology solutions and operating more efficiently,” said Councilmember Bruce Harrell, chair of the Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology Committee. “I look forward to working with Michael to make Seattle the most innovative city when it comes to use of technology in government.”

As CTO, Mr. Mattmiller will manage a department that has about 200 employees and an annual budget of $41.8 million. DoIT is responsible for the City’s main data center, Seattle.gov website, the Seattle Channel, the City’s fiber network, the City’s data and telephone network, the Public Safety Radio network and cable franchises. DoIT develops common standards, architectures and business solutions as part of policy planning to City departments and manages the City’s technology infrastructure to serve Seattle’s residents and businesses.

Mr. Mattmiller most recently worked as a Senior Strategist for Enterprise Cloud Privacy at Microsoft. From 2005 to 2013, he worked in the Washington DC-area on risk assurance and data management consulting work for PricewaterhouseCoopers. Mattmiller earned a Masters in Information Systems Technology from George Washington University.

DoIT has three key objectives:

  1. Serve the information needs of our residents, businesses, NGO partners and visitors to Seattle, with government information and data solutions available across web, mobile and television platforms.
  2. Lead by providing our internal City customers (employees and departments) innovative communication and information technology solutions that support effective and efficient services to our constituents.
  3. Make Seattle a national municipal leader in championing technology access and affordability for all the people of our City.

Link to Michael Mattmiller Confirmation Packet
Link to Confirmation Questions & Answers

[View in Council Newsroom]

Federal Police Monitor to Brief Council on Police Reform Progress


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 7/15/2014

Councilmember Bruce Harrell

Federal Police Monitor to Brief Council on Police Reform Progress

SeattleCouncilmember Bruce Harrell, chair of the Public Safety, Civil Rights, and Technology committee will host Federal Police Monitor Merrick Bobb and members of the Seattle Police Monitoring Team at committee this Wednesday. The Settlement Agreement requires the Federal Monitor to issue reports every six months detailing compliance and implementation of the Settlement Agreement.

The committee will also hear from Office of Professional Accountability (OPA) Director Pierce Murphy regarding cases closed during the months of January-March and receive an officer staffing update from the Seattle Police Department.

Councilmembers also intend to vote on Resolution 31535, affirming the Council’s intent to consider, in good faith, ways to address public comments regarding how to strengthen the City’s police accountability system.

WHAT:
Federal Police Monitor Merrick Bobb Briefing and action on police accountability

WHEN:
2:00 p.m., Wednesday, July 16

WHERE:
Seattle City Hall
Council Chambers, Second Floor
600 Fourth Ave, Seattle 98104

WHO:
Seattle City Councilmembers
Merrick Bobb
Police Monitoring Team
Pierce Murphy
Seattle Police Department

[View in Council Newsroom]

Councilmember Harrell to Explore Seattle Municipal ID Cards


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 7/14/2014





Untitled Document

Councilmember Bruce Harrell 

Councilmember Harrell to Explore Seattle Municipal ID Cards

SEATTLE Councilmember Bruce Harrell, chair of the Council’s Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology Committee, issued the following statement today regarding the City of Seattle exploring the idea of creating a program that will make voluntary municipal identification cards available to all city residents:

"There can be serious barriers to acquire a Washington State Identification Card for some residents, and without ID, people can face challenges in accessing important services. I think it is well-passed time to explore the creation of a municipal ID card program.  Cities such as New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and New Haven, CT have implemented programs, and, if we work closely with the ACLU to address privacy concerns, we could have a successful program in here in Seattle, too.

"A municipal ID card can provide a much more affordable and easier pathway for residents from diverse communities to succeed and more efficiently access critical services. I’ll be working with the Mayor, the Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs, ACLU and the public to determine whether a municipal ID card program is right for Seattle, and, if so, how we can make it successful.  Some of the benefits include:

  1. The identification card would be accepted as proof of identity by all City agencies, as well as other institutions within the City of Seattle.
  2. The implementation of the municipal ID Program could gain thousands of Seattle residents easier access in obtaining library cards, furthering education, getting medical help, cashing a check, signing leases, finding employment or opening a bank account.
  3. The identification card would allow many of Seattle’s most vulnerable residents such as immigrants and refugees, the elderly, the homeless and members of the transgender community better access to participating in civic life.
  4. The identification card will allow members of the immigrant and refugee community to gain greater confidence and feel more comfortable when seeking assistance from law enforcement.

"There is an exciting opportunity here, and if done right, a municipal ID card program could empower more Seattleites to succeed. I look forward to exploring the opportunities and pitfalls in the coming months to determine whether or how we can make this program a reality in Seattle."

The concept of a Seattle Municipal ID Card system will be discussed at the Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology Committee meeting on Wednesday July 16, 2014 at 2:00 p.m.


[View in Council Newsroom]

Councilmember Harrell to Honor Community Leaders at Civil Rights Act 50th Anniversary Celebration


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 7/9/2014

Councilmember Harrell to Honor Community Leaders at Civil Rights Act 50th Anniversary Celebration

SeattleCouncilmember Bruce Harrell will address attendees of the 50th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Act Celebration this Thursday at the Northwest African American Museum. He will honor outstanding individuals who exemplify a new generation of civil rights leaders in Seattle and have given selfless and devoted service to the cause of equality.

Councilmember Harrell will also present a proclamation declaring 2014 as the 50th Anniversary Year of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. On June 30, 2014, the City Council adopted Resolution 31532, recognizing the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act and reaffirming the City of Seattle’s unwavering commitment to civil rights, equal opportunity and freedom from discrimination for all.

The celebration is free and open to the public. Reverend Dr. Samuel S. McKinney will keynote the event, which will include music, light refreshments and a panel discussion from community leaders.

WHAT:
50th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Celebration

WHEN:
Thursday, July 10, 2014, 5:00 – 8:00 p.m.

WHERE:
Northwest African American Museum
2300 S. Massachusetts St. Seattle, WA 98118

WHO:
Councilmember Bruce A. Harrell
Local and State Leaders of the Civil Rights community
Public

The Civil Rights Act of 1964: http://research.archives.gov/description/299891

Civil Rights Legislation: http://civilrights.lbjlibrary.org/

Senate history of the Civil Rights Act:
http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/generic/CivilRightsAct1964.htm

House history of the Civil Rights Act:
http://history.house.gov/Exhibitions-and-Publications/Civil-Rights/1964-Essay/

[View in Council Newsroom]

Councilmember Harrell Statement on Mayor’s Public Safety Speech


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 6/25/2014

Councilmember Bruce Harrell

Councilmember Harrell Statement on Mayor’s Public Safety Speech

SEATTLE Councilmember Bruce Harrell, chair of the Council’s Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology Committee, issued the following statement today regarding Mayor Ed Murray’s state of the city public safety speech:

"I applaud Mayor Murray for outlining a pragmatic, call-to-action public safety plan. I would like to express my gratitude to the Mayor for prioritizing public safety and calling all departments to engage in addressing public safety. I believe our focus, commitment and collaborative partnerships will be much different than what this city has ever seen. We will work together to implement the short-term solutions and set the budget for long-term solutions that address the underlying root causes of the problems we are seeing.

"In addition to supporting the Mayor’s ‘Summer of Safety’ plan, I hope to continue working with the Mayor on the following policy and public safety budget issues:

  • Explore the feasibility of an automated gunshot locator system (AGLS) in the fall biennial City budget. The system uses acoustic sensors to instantly triangulate and identify the exact location of gunfire. This technology, often coupled with an activated camera system when shots occur in hotspot corridors, deters activities and significantly increases intelligence gathering of unlawful shooting activity.
  • A complete assessment of crime prevention programs targeting and helping 18-30 year olds. This group is often referred to as "opportunity youth," young people who are disconnected from education and employment pathways to success.
  • Seek a resolution to the unresolved ambiguity regarding the legality of medical dispensaries in Seattle. Medical dispensaries should provide access to medical quality cannabis to patients in need, not as a breeding ground for criminal activity as we’ve seen in recent violent incidents.
  • Partner with the community, local businesses, local sports teams, and faith-based communities to discourage the "No-Snitch" code. This "code" has been changed in other communities by changing the narrative to describing an opportunity to protect and serve one’s community.
  • Chief O’Toole must identify and support Precinct captains with a set of expectations for the foreseeable future and establish reasonable continuity in these positions. This is a particular concern to Southeast Seattle.
  • Examine community benefit agreements for employers to incentivize development in hotspot corridors. The city should partner with regional employers and labor to expand the summer youth program and increase training opportunities. As the Mayor stated, "nothing stops a bullet like a job."

"In addition to these items, Council will work with the Mayor and Chief O’Toole to focus on these major areas to improve public safety:

  • Focused and proactive crime reduction using evidence-based methods to reduce the most serious neighborhood crime problems;
  • Positively change the culture at SPD and attitudes related to the practice of collecting and reporting the required data as part of the six new policies developed as part of the Settlement Agreement;
  • Build community relationships and trust in all neighborhoods with a consistent visible presence; and,
  • Prioritize build out of the Business Intelligence System.

"As part of the confirmation of Chief O’Toole this last Monday, Council presented a letter of expectations to Chief O’Toole. Read the complete six-page letter of expectations to Chief O’Toole here."

[View in Council Newsroom]