New Cookin’ with Kilowatts Cookbook for the Energy-Conscious Foodie


Over the summer of 2017, Seattle City Light solicited its customers to take part in our Cookin’ with Kilowatts cooking contest with a mission: Conserving energy! We asked for recipes using a cooking method that uses less electricity than an oven or stovetop, and you delivered. Over 90 customers sent in recipes for this year’s contest.

Everyone that participated received a free chef’s hat and oven mitt, and those that finished in the third through seventh spots received a $25 gift card from contest sponsor Sea Wolf Bakers. The first and second place winners received an Instant Pot® and cooking class, respectively.

All the winners have been notified via email and the prizes have been distributed. Now, just in time for the holidays, we have published our third edition of the Cookin’ with Kilowatts cookbook. There’s often heavy use of electric ovens at this time of year, which can run up electric bills.

Want to get a preview? Here are three recipes from Cookin’ with Kilowatts Vol. III which will save you energy and money.

Skye Bars (and a Latte to Boot!)

“Utilize an espresso maker’s steam as an energy source (and then you get a glorious latte to boot) to heat the milk.” – Barbara K., Lake Forest Park

5 minutes in an espresso maker

Pan spray
2-2 1/2 C rolled oats
1 1/2 C chopped almonds and walnuts mixture
1 C raisins
1 C nut butter (any)
1 C milk (any)
3/4 C honey
(or agave/maple syrup)
1/2 C chocolate chips (optional)

Line 8″ x 8″ baking dish with plastic wrap, and spray with pan spray.

Mix the nuts and dried fruit, set aside.

Heat milk by loading espresso maker with coffee and allowing steam to build.

Steam milk until very warm (this step is doable with crockpot or microwave).

Quickly add 3/4 C of the hot milk to the honey and nut butter, and stir until well blended. (If using an espresso maker for this step, stop and pour yourself a latte with the freshly brewed coffee and warm milk.)

Mix wet with dry ingredients, stirring to coat well, adding more cereal/nuts as needed until mixture is stiff.

While still warm (but not hot), add chips (if using), not letting the chips melt.

Place in baking dish, and press firmly.

Put in fridge for 3 hours. Cut and enjoy.

Chicken Curry

“I love the aroma that fills the house during cooking. I take the naan or pita bread and either microwave it or place it on the lid of the slow cooker to get it nice and warm.” – Hina A, Seattle

6 to 6.5 hours in a crockpot

4 large chicken breasts (frozen is preferred, but not necessary) 3/4 C yogurt
1 C olive oil
2 tbsp ginger paste
3 large serrano chilies (spicy)
5 tbsp lemon juice;
1 bag of Shan curry spice mix
1 pouch instant quinoa

Place all ingredients into a crockpot in order listed above.

If chicken is frozen, set the crockpot on high for first 4 hours and low for next 2.5 hours. If the chicken is thawed, set the crockpot on low for 6 hours.

1/2 way through cooking time, stir the meat in the crockpot to make sure all ingredients are well mixed and cut the chicken into pieces with scissors.

3 minutes before it is done, put quinoa pouch in the microwave for 90 seconds and serve.

Serve with naan (optional).

 

Sweet & Smoky Pork Tacos

“I’ve tried a few “sweet pork” recipes but wasn’t very impressed with most of them. Thinking about all the different flavors I wanted and their relationship to each other was fun.” – Alicia E., Seattle

30 minutes in an Instant Pot®

For marinade:
3/4 C soy sauce
1/3 C (packed) brown sugar 1/3 C cider or red wine vinegar 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground cardamom

2.5-3 lbs pork roast, trimmed and cut into 1-inch chunks
1 tbsp canola oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped 4 oz can of diced green chilies 2 C your choice salsa
1/2 C (packed) brown sugar
1/2 C water
1 tsp ground cumin
2 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp oregano
1/4 tsp smoked paprika
1 tsp liquid smoke
Juice of 2 limes

Mix marinade ingredients in a gallon bag, add pork chunks.

Marinate for 1 hour or overnight.

Discard marinade.

Turn the pot to sauté feature, add oil.

Brown pork chunks.

Add the rest of the ingredients, stir.

Close pot, set high psi for 30 minutes.

Serve with corn tortillas, salsa, limes and cilantro.

To see the other winners (including our first and second place recipes, which are delicious!) you’re welcome to view the cookbook here. You can also see Vol. I here and Vol. II here.

 

Conserving Stossel Creek

Steelhead – photo by Oregon State University

Seattle City Light recently acquired 154 acres of land on Stossel Creek east of Duvall to preserve important habitat for coho salmon and steelhead.

The utility owns more than 13,000 acres of conservation lands to protect habitat for fish and wildlife. It’s part of our commitment to environmental stewardship in the areas where we generate clean hydropower to meet our customers’ electricity needs in a responsible manner. That’s one more reason we are the nation’s greenest utility.

Here’s what Mountains to Sound Greenway wrote about the Stossel Creek purchase in their Spring issue of the Connections newsletter:

Seattle City Light acquired 154 acres on Stossel Creek, an important coho and steelhead tributary to the Tolt River, for the purpose of habitat restoration. The property is located just east of Duvall and adjacent to the Marckworth State Forest, managed by Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR). The acquisition is a key component of a regional conservation strategy, led by DNR, King County, and the Tolt Fish Habitat Restoration Group, to undertake restoration in the basin, including reconnecting wetland complexes to the creek and removing and reducing sediment input to Stossel Creek and the Tolt River. Seattle City Light is the 10th largest public electric utility in the United States and has been greenhouse gas neutral since 2005, the first electric utility in the nation to achieve that distinction.

Seattle City Light, BPA, EPRI to Host Data Center Efficiency Workshop

Seattle City Light, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and the Electric Power research Institute (EPRI) are conducting a workshop March 10 that will explain how to provide a reliable, more efficient operating environment for data centers and IT equipment rooms that could reduce an entire building’s electric costs by 5 to 10 percent.

Data Center and IT equipment rooms are often one of the largest energy uses in a commercial building.  Even a small server room, can consume more than half the electricity used in a commercial building.

Often the cooling systems in these facilities use more power than the IT equipment itself.  Poor air management in these rooms also reduces the reliability of the cooling equipment which can lead to equipment failure.

The workshop at the Museum of Flight in Seattle brings together data center operators, utilities, and industry players to explore the challenges that face modern data centers in cooling, with a focus on efficient airflow management. Experts will share insight into best-practices for airflow management in data centers. Essential tools to build a business case for these solutions will be provided. In addition, a panel of utility participants will delve into the impact and success of utility incentive programs for energy efficiency, and how the measurement and verification process for incentives can be streamlined for these measures.

A detailed agenda and registration are available online via the EPRI website. The cost is $50.

Seattle City Light is the 10th largest public electric utility in the United States. It has some of the lowest cost customer rates of any urban utility, providing reliable, renewable and environmentally responsible power to about 750,000 Seattle area residents. City Light has been greenhouse gas neutral since 2005, the first electric utility in the nation to achieve that distinction.

Seattle City Light, BPA, EPRI to Host Data Center Efficiency Workshop

Seattle City Light, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and the Electric Power research Institute (EPRI) are conducting a workshop March 10 that will explain how to provide a reliable, more efficient operating environment for data centers and IT equipment rooms that could reduce an entire building’s electric costs by 5 to 10 percent.

Data Center and IT equipment rooms are often one of the largest energy uses in a commercial building.  Even a small server room, can consume more than half the electricity used in a commercial building.

Often the cooling systems in these facilities use more power than the IT equipment itself.  Poor air management in these rooms also reduces the reliability of the cooling equipment which can lead to equipment failure.

The workshop at the Museum of Flight in Seattle brings together data center operators, utilities, and industry players to explore the challenges that face modern data centers in cooling, with a focus on efficient airflow management. Experts will share insight into best-practices for airflow management in data centers. Essential tools to build a business case for these solutions will be provided. In addition, a panel of utility participants will delve into the impact and success of utility incentive programs for energy efficiency, and how the measurement and verification process for incentives can be streamlined for these measures.

A detailed agenda and registration are available online via the EPRI website. The cost is $50.

Seattle City Light is the 10th largest public electric utility in the United States. It has some of the lowest cost customer rates of any urban utility, providing reliable, renewable and environmentally responsible power to about 750,000 Seattle area residents. City Light has been greenhouse gas neutral since 2005, the first electric utility in the nation to achieve that distinction.

Fall 2015 Public Art Conservation Highlights

Whether you live, work or play in the city, chances are good that you’ve run into construction resulting from the Mercer Corridor Project, an improvement project stretching along Mercer Street from I-5 to 5th Avenue West. Portions of the project included sidewalk renovations in front of the Phelps Center, where two Chinese Guardian Lion sculptures have stood guard since 1974.

This project gave conservation staff a chance to carefully clean and apply protective coatings to the longstanding pair. The Guardian Lions were given to the city from Taiwan as a memento of their participation in the Seattle World’s Fair in 1962. The sculptures were carved by Chinese artisans under the supervision of the Taiwan Handicraft Promotion Center. Seattle City Councilman, Wing Luke was instrumental in the city receiving this gift in 1963.

On a foggy day at Magnuson Park your eyes might just deceive you into thinking you’ve happened upon an earth-bound pod of killer whales. But this imaginative installation is actually comprised of inverted diving fins from decommissioned US Navy attack submarines.

Working in collaboration with artist John Young and former students from the University of Washington, the fins were treated for corrosion and re-painted in September to restore their luminous surfaces.

Bordering the northeast corner of Beacon Hill is an expansive golf course with a resonant history. In 1915, Jefferson Park Municipal Golf Course opened to the public after golf activists E.C. Cheasty and Sherwood Gillespy presented the Seattle City Council with a 1,000 signature petition requesting the creation of an 18-hole course at Jefferson Park. Unfortunately, both men passed away before knowing if their efforts were successful, yet in honor of his tireless dedication, friends of Sherwood Gillespy commissioned Danish sculptor Max Nielson to create a bronze sculpture in his likeness. This year marks 100 years that the statue has welcomed visitors to the clubhouse, and conservation activities included fabrication and replacement of the bronze reservoirs that embellish the granite foundation.