The Office of Arts & Culture invests more than $160,000 in individual artists’ work

 32 artist projects funded through CityArtist Projects grant for 2018

The Office of Arts & Culture is supporting 32 artists through the CityArtist Projects grant, a funding program that has invested more than $1.7 M in individual artists over the last 10 years. Funding for 2018 goes to support artists’ work in Literary (except Playwriting), Media/Film, and Visual Arts. This year 57% awards went to first time applicants.

“Art can’t happen without artists. It is vital that we invest in the people who are creating and making work in our city,” says Randy Engstrom, director the Office of Arts & Culture. “They are the creative spirit that move us and reflect back the world we live in.”

Several funded works tackle issues facing our society today including the LGBTQ movement, childhood abuse, intergenerational and mixed race exchanges, mental illness, and Native American and Black depictions in society. In addition, immersive installations, bilingual performances and new musical compositions are some of the artworks funded in this cycle of CityArtist Projects.

2017 CityArtist Projects highlights:

  • Leah L. Piepzna-Samarasinha will curate and produce a literary event with 12 queer artists with disabilities exploring the theme of disability resistance.
  • Amy Jean Enser will complete a feature documentary combining film and live stage performance based on ‘Buckaroo,’ a male revue that follows the visionaries behind the Moulin Rouge-inspired cabaret club.
  • Rafael Soldi will create a new photographic installation and sculptural objects that share the artists story of immigration. There will be a public exhibit/lecture and an international online platform.

CityArtist Projects 2018 funded artists:

Ivan Arteaga, Etienne Cakpo-Gbokou, Anna Maria Campoy, Terry Crane, Alex Crozier-Jackson, Jade Solomon Curtis, Hilary Field, Robert Flor, Sarah Foster, Alice Gosti, Stephen Griggs, Kimberly Holloway, David Ingram, Leslie Law, Veronica Lee-Baik, Jill Marissa, Ricki Mason, KT Niehoff, Serene Petersen, Peggy Piacenza, Elspeth Savani, Che Sehyun, Michael Shantz, Jessie Smith, Timothy Smith-Stewart, Ilvs Strauss, John Teske, Carol Thomson, Storme Webber, Amontaine Aurore Woods.

CityArtists Projects grant funds artists to develop and present new works, supporting artists and their artistic and cultural expression that reflects Seattle’s diversity. Awards range from $2,000 to $8,000.

For more information on public art and the Office of Arts & Culture, go here: http://www.seattle.gov/arts/cityartist-projects

The Office of Arts & Culture invests $157,161 in individual artists work

30 artist projects funded through CityArtist Projects grant for 2017

SEATTLE, (November 30, 2016) — The Office of Arts & Culture is supporting 30 artists through CityArtist Projects, a funding program that has invested more than $1.7 M in individual artists for 10 years. Funding for 2017 goes to support artists’ work in literary including scripts, media/film, and visual arts. This year 57% awards went to first time applicants.

“Art can’t happen without artists. It is vital that we invest in the people who are creating and making work in our city,” says Randy Engstrom, director the Office of Arts & Culture. “They are the creative spirit that move us and reflect back the world we live in.”

Several funded works tackle issues facing our society today including the LGBTQ movement, childhood abuse, intergenerational and mixed race exchanges, mental illness, and Native American and Black depictions in society. In addition, immersive installations, bilingual performances and new musical compositions are some of the artworks funded in this cycle of CityArtist Projects.

2017 CityArtist Projects highlights:

  • Ana Maria Campoy will perform a bilingual staging of the award-winning play Proof, to raise awareness of mental illness and genius through a Latino cultural lens. Performances will be offered on three residential porches in three different neighborhoods.
  • Leslie Law will write, produce, record and broadcast a live radio theater performance episode with an original live music score and sound effects.
  • John Teske will develop an iterative series of new compositions that are uniquely algorithmically generated and accessible on-line. Teske will lead workshops on graphic scores and improvisation with music students at Washington, Aki Kurose and Mercer Middle Schools. The compositions will be premiered by an ensemble of six musicians with strings, winds, percussion and electronics.

CityArtist Projects 2017 funded artists:

Ivan Arteaga, Etienne Cakpo-Gbokou, Anna Maria Campoy, Terry Crane, Alex Crozier-Jackson, Jade Solomon Curtis, Hilary Field, Robert Flor, Sarah Foster, Alice Gosti, Stephen Griggs, Kimberly Holloway, David Ingram, Leslie Law, Veronica Lee-Baik, Jill Marissa, Ricki Mason, KT Niehoff, Serene Petersen, Peggy Piacenza, Elspeth Savani, Che Sehyun, Michael Shantz, Jessie Smith, Timothy Smith-Stewart, Ilvs Strauss, John Teske, Carol Thomson, Storme Webber, Amontaine Aurore Woods.

CityArtists Projects grant seeks to fund artist to develop and present new works. Supporting artists and their artistic and cultural expression that reflects Seattle’s diversity. Awards ranged from $2,000 to $8,000.

For more information on public art and the Office of Arts & Culture, go here: http://www.seattle.gov/arts/cityartist-projects

Image: John Osebold by Victoria Lahti.

Seattle’s Office of Arts & Culture announces $2.45 M in grants available

The Office of Arts & Culture announced that $2.4M in cultural program grants are available to expand public access to arts and cultural organizations, develop and renovate arts spaces, support community festivals, individual artists, and youth programs and foster innovative projects. The office’s goal is to foster a city driven by creativity that provides the opportunity for people of all cultural backgrounds to engage in diverse arts and cultural experiences.

“Investing in the arts makes our community more vibrant, spurs economic growth and can also help further our ongoing pursuits of social and economic justice,” says Mayor Ed Murray. “These grants will make a meaningful impact in our communities by expanding access to the arts for residents throughout our city.”

The office’s cultural partnerships programs support performances, events, exhibitions and permanent and temporary artworks, from neighborhood festivals to mainstage performances to arts training for youth. In 2014, the city invested $2.45 million to support more than 360 individuals and institutions, representing a major investment in Seattle’s cultural and artistic community, and in the city’s greater civic life.

Cultural Partnerships grant programs provide funding for arts and cultural groups, individual artists, and youth service and community-based organizations. Below are applications opening dates for the following programs in 2015:

 

Grant Program Application Dates Amount
Work Readiness Arts Program 2015 February 17 – April 1 (open now!) $100,718
Civic Partners 2016 and 2017 May 5 – June 30 $1,700,000*
CityArtist Projects 2016 May 27 – July22 $160,000
Cultural Facilities 2015-16 June 22 – September 4 $175,000
Neighborhood & Community Arts 2016 August 18 – October 21 $48,000
Youth Arts 2016 December (exact date tbd) $175,000
smART Ventures 2015 Ongoing $50,000

 

* This amount is based on current year budget. The City’s 2016 budget process will determine the total funding available through this program for that year. Those awarded in 2016 will also receive funding in 2017.

In addition, $50,000 will be distributed through all of our funding programs for projects benefitting Seattle youth through the arts.

For more information on funding opportunities and the Office of Arts & Culture, go here: http://www.seattle.gov/arts/funding/default.asp.

CityArtist Rodrigo Valenzuela’s “Maria TV”

Pictured: A scene from filming Maria TV

Between combating stereotypes, challenging homogenous media, and telling stories of people with “invisible jobs,” the experimental documentary Maria TV has a lot to accomplish. But director Rodrigo Valenzuela, using real life stories and people, is creating something that will provoke these existing ideologies.

Maria TV is a response to the way many Hispanic women, especially domestic workers such as nannies and maids, are portrayed in media. Valenzuela has gathered 15 Hispanic women from the Seattle area, and facilitates activities on camera that they might not normally interact in, to tell their real stories, and to start to understand the impact that television has had on their understanding of the world.

There are a few ways that Rodrigo aims to bring the lives of these women to the screen. One is through interviewing, asking them to talk about their backgrounds, jobs, experiences, and life. Another is bringing in acting coaches, and having them do theater exercises with the women, such as fluid sculptures and play back theater. The third way is to have these women take roles in television shows that misrepresent them. He sets this up by having a telenovela play behind them, and letting them interact with the dialogue, especially with the male characters. The main goal in this whole project is to empower women, to put real people on the screens, instead of showing a façade of life that the telenovelas normally show.

When Rodrigo reminisced about growing up watching telenovelas in Chile, he recalled that the series finale of some of the shows were as big as an important soccer game, so it’s not surprising what an influence this has been on his, and others, lives.  Another big influence on Maria TV was Valenzuela’s own maid back home. She was hired when he was one month old, and is still working for his family in Chile today. He speaks incredibly highly of her, as being so smart, kind, and overall, as an incredibly positive influence on his life, but he does question the issue of class relations in regards to nannies and maids in general, which is another aspect that he wants Maria TV to touch on.

Valenzuela is currently finishing up filming Maria TV, and is attending a spring residency in Vermont studio center to edit and complete the film. This summer he is planning on screening the documentary at Northwest Film Forum. before going in residencies at Center for Photography at Woodstock and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts. Stay tuned for updates on Maria TV!

Photo courtesy of Rodrigo Valenzuela.

The CityArtist program supports the development and presentation of work by independent Seattle-based artists. The Office of Arts & Culture will post/share stories about the CityArtist’s works in-progress based on interviews and site visits by staff members Annie Holden and Irene Gómez. Learn more about the CityArtist grant here, and read more CityArtist stories here.

“In Country”: a film by CityArtist Mike Attie

On certain weekends, there is a war happening in the remote Oregon forest. The Vietnam War. For a few days at a time throughout the year, American veterans will gather in these Pacific Northwest forests, guns filled with blanks, and reenact aspects of the infamous war that took place during the late 1960’s.

Why do these people, these veterans, want to relive the experiences of war? CityArtist Mike Attie and co-director Meghan O’Hara, in full period regalia (except their modern age cameras), is there, to tell the stories of these men, and to create documentary film In Country. This documentary will start to answer some of these questions, and thus, create a better understanding of the concept of war as a whole, by understanding and unpacking both the camaraderie that happens on the battlefield to the unraveling psyches of those participating fighters.

Unlike the Civil War reenactments that may come to mind, these battles are very different from the performances at Gettysburg. What these men do are not meant for a public audience, so viewing them in In Country will be the first chance for many to witness these replications of wartime. To gain this type of access, Attie described the amount of trust he had to earn from these men, as documentary filmmaking, especially in a recreation of Vietnam in the late 60’s, is a serious, immersive experience.

Turn a full 360 degrees with Mike Attie & Meghan O’Hara as they go from living out of backpacks, sleeping in mud during shoots, to sitting in a meeting in New York City with the Sundance Institute Documentary Film Program (Yes, that Sundance). Here, the Institute invited Attie and O’Hara to apply to a post-production grant, which such highly regarded docs such as The Square and Queen of Versailles have received in past years. Last week, it was announced that In Country was one of the recipients of this grant. Between raising $26,445 on their Kickstarter (which was $10,000 over their goal!), receiving grants from our Office, 4culture, and many other film festivals, we’re really proud of Attie & O’Hara, and we are glad to be one of the many contributors to their film’s success. The documentary is having it’s premiere in Durham at Full Frame Fest, and will then be shown in Sarasota, Boston and Toronto. Watch for a release date in Seattle, to be determined soon!

The CityArtist program supports the development and presentation of work by independent Seattle-based artists. The Office of Arts & Culture will post/share stories about the CityArtist’s works in-progress based on interviews and site visits by staff members Annie Holden and Irene Gómez. Learn more about the CityArtist grant here, and read more CityArtist stories here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All photos are stills from In Country, courtesy Mike Attie.