2018 Grant Updates

The Seattle Office of Arts & Culture grant program, which has been investing in the arts and cultural community for over 40 years, will see significant changes in 2018 and 2019 as the City transitions to a new online Citywide grant platform. Grant programs will continue to be available including CityArtists Projects, Civic Partners, Arts in Parks, Neighborhood & Community Arts, smART ventures, Youth Arts, and Cultural Facilities Fund.

Investing in a new platform that will produce a better experience for applicants and aligns with race and social justice values by providing more equity in opportunities for artists and communities of color, is a major undertaking for ARTS and the City. 2018 will be a year of transition while this new platform is built and grant program staff continue to research and test innovative ideas based on community feedback from underserved and underrepresented community stakeholders.

While the new grant platform is being built, ARTS’ current grant platform, CultureGrants Online (CGO) will no longer be supported by WESTAF – as of June 30, 2018. This means that:

  • a number of grants will be hosted on interim platforms
  • organizations and individuals who have application material in the CGO system, will need to save application materials. ARTS will offer workshops and webinars to help guide you through this process.

For additional information on each program please see below.

Grant Program Application Dates  

Program Manager

 

Arts in Parks 2019

 

Scheduled to open August 2018  

Jenny Crooks
206.684.7084

 

Civic Partners 2019 Currently funded organizations will have their funding extend through 2019. New organizations interested in 2019 funding will be able to apply in early 2019.

 

Kathy Hsieh
206.733.9926
CityArtist Projects 2019 Scheduled to open May 2018  

Irene Gómez
206.684.7310

 

Cultural Facilities Fund 2018 More information available April 2018  

Matthew Richter
206.733.9955

 

Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute Facilities Grant Ongoing, no changes Amanda Licorish
206.684.4758
Neighborhood &

Community Arts

 

Scheduled to open August 2018 Jenny Crooks
206.684.7084
Youth Arts 2018 – 2019 More information available April 2018 Kristi Woo
206.727.8671
smART Ventures 2018 Ongoing, no changes  

Jenny Crooks
206.684.7084

 

Please let us know additional ways ARTS can help as we navigate these changes with you. As always we welcome your feedback and input.

The Office of Arts & Culture invests more than $160,000 in individual artists’ work

 32 artist projects funded through CityArtist Projects grant for 2018

The Office of Arts & Culture is supporting 32 artists through the CityArtist Projects grant, a funding program that has invested more than $1.7 M in individual artists over the last 10 years. Funding for 2018 goes to support artists’ work in Literary (except Playwriting), Media/Film, and Visual Arts. This year 57% awards went to first time applicants.

“Art can’t happen without artists. It is vital that we invest in the people who are creating and making work in our city,” says Randy Engstrom, director the Office of Arts & Culture. “They are the creative spirit that move us and reflect back the world we live in.”

Several funded works tackle issues facing our society today including the LGBTQ movement, childhood abuse, intergenerational and mixed race exchanges, mental illness, and Native American and Black depictions in society. In addition, immersive installations, bilingual performances and new musical compositions are some of the artworks funded in this cycle of CityArtist Projects.

2017 CityArtist Projects highlights:

  • Leah L. Piepzna-Samarasinha will curate and produce a literary event with 12 queer artists with disabilities exploring the theme of disability resistance.
  • Amy Jean Enser will complete a feature documentary combining film and live stage performance based on ‘Buckaroo,’ a male revue that follows the visionaries behind the Moulin Rouge-inspired cabaret club.
  • Rafael Soldi will create a new photographic installation and sculptural objects that share the artists story of immigration. There will be a public exhibit/lecture and an international online platform.

CityArtist Projects 2018 funded artists:

Ivan Arteaga, Etienne Cakpo-Gbokou, Anna Maria Campoy, Terry Crane, Alex Crozier-Jackson, Jade Solomon Curtis, Hilary Field, Robert Flor, Sarah Foster, Alice Gosti, Stephen Griggs, Kimberly Holloway, David Ingram, Leslie Law, Veronica Lee-Baik, Jill Marissa, Ricki Mason, KT Niehoff, Serene Petersen, Peggy Piacenza, Elspeth Savani, Che Sehyun, Michael Shantz, Jessie Smith, Timothy Smith-Stewart, Ilvs Strauss, John Teske, Carol Thomson, Storme Webber, Amontaine Aurore Woods.

CityArtists Projects grant funds artists to develop and present new works, supporting artists and their artistic and cultural expression that reflects Seattle’s diversity. Awards range from $2,000 to $8,000.

For more information on public art and the Office of Arts & Culture, go here: http://www.seattle.gov/arts/cityartist-projects

The Office of Arts & Culture invests $157,161 in individual artists work

30 artist projects funded through CityArtist Projects grant for 2017

SEATTLE, (November 30, 2016) — The Office of Arts & Culture is supporting 30 artists through CityArtist Projects, a funding program that has invested more than $1.7 M in individual artists for 10 years. Funding for 2017 goes to support artists’ work in literary including scripts, media/film, and visual arts. This year 57% awards went to first time applicants.

“Art can’t happen without artists. It is vital that we invest in the people who are creating and making work in our city,” says Randy Engstrom, director the Office of Arts & Culture. “They are the creative spirit that move us and reflect back the world we live in.”

Several funded works tackle issues facing our society today including the LGBTQ movement, childhood abuse, intergenerational and mixed race exchanges, mental illness, and Native American and Black depictions in society. In addition, immersive installations, bilingual performances and new musical compositions are some of the artworks funded in this cycle of CityArtist Projects.

2017 CityArtist Projects highlights:

  • Ana Maria Campoy will perform a bilingual staging of the award-winning play Proof, to raise awareness of mental illness and genius through a Latino cultural lens. Performances will be offered on three residential porches in three different neighborhoods.
  • Leslie Law will write, produce, record and broadcast a live radio theater performance episode with an original live music score and sound effects.
  • John Teske will develop an iterative series of new compositions that are uniquely algorithmically generated and accessible on-line. Teske will lead workshops on graphic scores and improvisation with music students at Washington, Aki Kurose and Mercer Middle Schools. The compositions will be premiered by an ensemble of six musicians with strings, winds, percussion and electronics.

CityArtist Projects 2017 funded artists:

Ivan Arteaga, Etienne Cakpo-Gbokou, Anna Maria Campoy, Terry Crane, Alex Crozier-Jackson, Jade Solomon Curtis, Hilary Field, Robert Flor, Sarah Foster, Alice Gosti, Stephen Griggs, Kimberly Holloway, David Ingram, Leslie Law, Veronica Lee-Baik, Jill Marissa, Ricki Mason, KT Niehoff, Serene Petersen, Peggy Piacenza, Elspeth Savani, Che Sehyun, Michael Shantz, Jessie Smith, Timothy Smith-Stewart, Ilvs Strauss, John Teske, Carol Thomson, Storme Webber, Amontaine Aurore Woods.

CityArtists Projects grant seeks to fund artist to develop and present new works. Supporting artists and their artistic and cultural expression that reflects Seattle’s diversity. Awards ranged from $2,000 to $8,000.

For more information on public art and the Office of Arts & Culture, go here: http://www.seattle.gov/arts/cityartist-projects

Image: John Osebold by Victoria Lahti.

Where the House Was, A last reading at Hugo House

A last reading at Hugo House by Frances McCue with Rebecca Brown, Cellist Lori Goldston and a warm up with poets Jack Chelgren and Cali Kopczick

Thursday, May 19, 2016, 7:30 p.m.
Hugo House
1634 11th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122
Free and open to the public

On May 19, the last public event at Hugo House will feature writer and co-founder Frances McCue accompanied by Rebecca Brown, Cellist Lori Goldston, Jack Chelgren and Cali Kipczick.

More than ten years ago, McCue co-founded the Richard Hugo House literary center. Now, the building is set for demolition and McCue is making a documentary film about the history and impending transformation of the house. The spine of that film, Where the House Was, will be a long poem. On May 19 at 7:30 p.m. McCue will give the first public reading of selections from the poem and clips from the film in-progress will be screened.

McCue will be joined by Rebecca Brown, a Lambda-award-winning author who served as Hugo House’s inaugural writer-in-residence and whose prose McCue calls “deep, grounding, vital and inspiring” and Lori Goldston, who is in her own words a “classically trained and rigorously de-trained” cellist who is perhaps best known around Seattle for her work on Nirvana’s 1993 MTV Unplugged set. McCue hired Goldston’s Black Cat Orchestra for the opening of Hugo House and “adores how Lori’s solo work makes one cello actually sound like a whole ensemble. She is one of my favorite musicians working today.” Cali Kopczick and Jack Chelgren, young writers who began their careers studying under McCue and are now active published poets and literary citizens of Seattle will be the warm up act.

The crew of Where the House Was will be filming for posterity as well as possible inclusion in the documentary.

McCue is a CityArtist Projects recipient, a program of the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture and Where the House Was, is a project of LOVECITYLOVE.

Seattle Office of Arts & Culture 2016 grant schedule

The Seattle Office of Arts & Culture is investing over $1M in cultural program grants in 2016. These grants expand public access to arts and cultural organizations, develop and renovate arts spaces, support community festivals, individual artists and youth programs and foster innovative projects. For more information about our grants visit http://www.seattle.gov/arts/grants

Grant and application opening dates for 2016

Work Readiness Arts Program 2016, application dates February 16 – March 31
The Seattle Office of Arts & Culture, in collaboration with the Seattle Youth Violence Prevention Initiative (SYVPI), funds arts, cultural and community organizations providing programming that links arts learning and work experiences for Seattle youth ages 12 to 18 years old.

CityArtist Projects 2017, application dates May 25 – July 20
Provides funding for Seattle-based individual artists to develop and present their work. The 2017 cycle will award grants to artists working in dance/choreography, music/composition and theater/performance/scriptwriting.

Cultural Facilities 2016-17, application dates June 20 – September 1
Supports Seattle-based arts, heritage, cultural and arts service organizations with facility renovation or new facility projects.

Neighborhood & Community Arts 2016, application dates August 16 – October 19
Supports Seattle’s neighborhood arts councils and community groups that produce events to promote arts and cultural participation and build community.

smART Ventures 2016, application dates ongoing
Provides support ranging from $500 to $1,000, to individuals, organizations and communities that may not qualify for other funding programs.