Mayor Durkan Signs Ordinance Designating Mount Zion Baptist Church a Seattle Landmark

Mayor Jenny A. Durkan signed the landmark designation ordinance for Mount Zion Baptist Church located at 1634 Rev. Dr. S. McKinney Avenue. This new landmark joins more than 400 landmarks in the city that are recognized for their contributions to Seattle’s rich cultural and architectural heritage.

“Mt. Zion Baptist Church has been a place for community and worship for 128 years and a civic fixture with a strong legacy of championing civil rights,” said Mayor Durkan. “For generations to come, Mt. Zion will be a landmark of our great city, and will continue to be a beacon for love, community, and justice.”

“Mount Zion is a second home to many in our African American community. The cornerstone of the Mount Zion church family is self-help, the empowerment of people, and reinforcing the community spiritually, educationally, socially, and politically – it is a place of hope and camaraderie for positive change,” said Council President Bruce Harrell. “Mount Zion is the bedrock of the Central District and represents culture, history, and meaning to so many in our community. Mt. Zion’s door is open to all and a place where all families can call a second home.”

The Landmarks Preservation Board designated this property on October 18, 2017 based on all six designation standards making it one of four city landmarks honored with this distinction. The Board also recognized the Mount Zion Baptist Church’s more than 100-year legacy on this site and its continued service to the Seattle community for more than 125 years. The landmark was nominated by a group from Mount Zion led by Reverend Dr. Phyllis Beaumonte.

“With Mount Zion Baptist Church’s status as a Seattle Historic Landmark comes the assurance that the legacy of faith, love, hope, and justice, which began 128 years ago, will continue,” said Rev. Dr. Beaumonte.

Reverend Dr. Samuel B. McKinney served as pastor at Mount Zion for more than four decades and was the visionary for the Educational Wing (1962) and the Church building (1975); both buildings remain today. The Fellowship Hall hosted thousands of educational programs and city events and has historically been a meeting place for civil rights activists, clergy, local leaders, and members of the community. The church’s distinct design was the product of Reverend Dr. McKinney’s vision to create a place of worship that reflected African heritage through its structural form and architectural vocabulary. His design was a collaboration with local architectural firm Durham, Anderson & Freed.

As a designated City landmark, the Mount Zion Baptist Church is not only recognized for its historic and cultural significance, but also becomes eligible for economic incentives and technical assistance for the continued preservation of the landmark.

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Historic Preservation Program is responsible for the designation and protection of more than 400 historic structures, sites, objects, and vessels, as well as eight historic districts located throughout the city. For more information on the landmark designation process and to view other city landmarks, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/preservation.

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Mayor Durkan Signs Ordinance Designating Mount Zion Baptist Church a Seattle Landmark

Mayor Jenny A. Durkan signed the landmark designation ordinance for Mount Zion Baptist Church located at 1634 Rev. Dr. S. McKinney Avenue. This new landmark joins more than 400 landmarks in the city that are recognized for their contributions to Seattle’s rich cultural and architectural heritage.

“Mt. Zion Baptist Church has been a place for community and worship for 128 years and a civic fixture with a strong legacy of championing civil rights,” said Mayor Durkan. “For generations to come, Mt. Zion will be a landmark of our great city, and will continue to be a beacon for love, community, and justice.”

“Mount Zion is a second home to many in our African American community. The cornerstone of the Mount Zion church family is self-help, the empowerment of people, and reinforcing the community spiritually, educationally, socially, and politically – it is a place of hope and camaraderie for positive change,” said Council President Bruce Harrell. “Mount Zion is the bedrock of the Central District and represents culture, history, and meaning to so many in our community. Mt. Zion’s door is open to all and a place where all families can call a second home.”

The Landmarks Preservation Board designated this property on October 18, 2017 based on all six designation standards making it one of four city landmarks honored with this distinction. The Board also recognized the Mount Zion Baptist Church’s more than 100-year legacy on this site and its continued service to the Seattle community for more than 125 years. The landmark was nominated by a group from Mount Zion led by Reverend Dr. Phyllis Beaumonte.

“With Mount Zion Baptist Church’s status as a Seattle Historic Landmark comes the assurance that the legacy of faith, love, hope, and justice, which began 128 years ago, will continue,” said Rev. Dr. Beaumonte.

Reverend Dr. Samuel B. McKinney served as pastor at Mount Zion for more than four decades and was the visionary for the Educational Wing (1962) and the Church building (1975); both buildings remain today. The Fellowship Hall hosted thousands of educational programs and city events and has historically been a meeting place for civil rights activists, clergy, local leaders, and members of the community. The church’s distinct design was the product of Reverend Dr. McKinney’s vision to create a place of worship that reflected African heritage through its structural form and architectural vocabulary. His design was a collaboration with local architectural firm Durham, Anderson & Freed.

As a designated City landmark, the Mount Zion Baptist Church is not only recognized for its historic and cultural significance, but also becomes eligible for economic incentives and technical assistance for the continued preservation of the landmark.

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Historic Preservation Program is responsible for the designation and protection of more than 400 historic structures, sites, objects, and vessels, as well as eight historic districts located throughout the city. For more information on the landmark designation process and to view other city landmarks, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/preservation.

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Standing Advisory Committee of the Swedish Cherry Hill campus to meet monthly

The Standing Advisory Committee for Swedish Cherry Hill  will begin regular meetings on the 2nd Wednesday of each month beginning May 9. The meetings will be held at Swedish Cherry Hill at 500 17th Ave, James Tower – Swedish Education Conference Center (SECC) beginning at 6:00 p.m.

The Standing Advisory Committee’s role is to provide feedback to the City of Seattle and Swedish Cherry Hill on projects planned and under development by the medical center to ensure it complies with its Master Plan. The Master Plan describes zoning rules, long-range planning of the property, and transportation planning. The meetings are open to the public and a portion of each agenda is set aside for public comments.

The committee is made up of neighbors and community members who have experience in neighborhood organizing and issues, land use and zoning, architecture or landscape architecture, economic development, building development, or medical services. The committee also includes representatives from Swedish-Cherry Hill and the City of Seattle.

If you would like to be notified via email if a meeting is canceled or changed, please sign up here. If you do not have access to email, contact Maureen Sheehan at 206.684.0302, and she will put you on a call list.

For more information, contact Maureen Sheehan maureen.sheehan@seattle.gov or call her at 206.684.0302.

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Landmarks Preservation Board to consider nomination of the East Pine Substation for landmark status

Seattle’s Landmarks Preservation Board will consider nomination of the East Pine Substation at 1501 23rd Avenue in Central Area on Wednesday, March 21, 2018 at 3:30 p.m. The meeting will be held in Seattle City Hall (600 4th Avenue, Floor L2) in the Boards & Commissions Room L2-80.

The public is invited to attend the meeting and make comments regarding the nomination. Written comments are also accepted and should be received by the Landmarks Preservation Board at the following mailing address by 3:00 p.m. on March 20:

Seattle Landmarks Preservation Board
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
PO Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124-4649

A copy of the Landmark Nomination is available for public review at the Douglass-Truth Library (2300 East Yesler Way) and the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods office in Seattle City Hall, 600 4th Avenue, 4th Floor (206-684-0228). It is also posted on the Department of Neighborhoods website under the heading of “Current Nominations.”

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Volunteers needed to advise on development plans for Seattle University and Swedish First Hill

Here’s your chance to advise the City on the development plans of either Seattle University or Swedish First Hill campus. Seattle Department of Neighborhoods is seeking interested community members from surrounding neighborhoods to participate on one of the Standing Advisory Committees (SAC) for these two institutions. Each committee provides feedback on projects planned and under development by the institution or school to ensure it complies with its Master Plan. The Master Plan describes zoning rules, long range planning of the property, and transportation planning.

Community members who have experience in neighborhood organizing and issues, land use and zoning, architecture or landscape architecture, economic development, building development, educational services, or just an interest in their neighborhood’s future are encouraged to apply.

The committees meet in the evenings on the institution’s campus one to four times a year. Committee members serve a two-year renewable term. If you are interested in serving on one of these committees, send a letter of interest by either e-mail or regular mail by Friday, January 19 to: 

Maureen Sheehan

E-mail: Maureen.Sheehan@seattle.gov

Mailing Address:  Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, P.O. Box 94649, Seattle WA 98124-4649

For more information contact Richard Fink, Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, at 206-386-1948.


The City of Seattle is committed to promoting diversity in its boards and committees; women, young adults, senior citizens, persons with disabilities, sexual and gender minorities, persons of color, and immigrants are highly encouraged to apply.

The Major Institutions and Schools Program provides a way for neighbors of Seattle’s hospitals, universities, and colleges to be directly involved in the development plans for those institutions to ensure neighborhood concerns are considered when those plans are made. It is a program of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods.

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