Making The 8 Less L8! | Today – 8/28

One of the busiest stretches of Denny Way, eastbound from Fairview Ave E to Stewart St, is about to get a new transit-only lane—dedicated to moving many people efficiently. The project is part of a larger effort to address the historically late King County Metro Route 8, which serves an estimated 10,000 riders per weekday.

Diagram of new Denny Way configuration, Fairview Ave to Stewart St.

 

Work starts this afternoon, August 24, to transform one underutilized westbound lane of Denny Way for eastbound general-purpose traffic to Capitol Hill and dedicating the middle eastbound lane of the resulting three, to mass transit around the biggest single bottleneck that Route 8 experiences. The area is already bordered by construction projects, so crews can sometimes use will use the existing lane closures.

 

Route 8 currently runs 6 buses an hour per direction in peak periods. Separating the lane of cars turning right onto Yale to get to I-5 is expected to reduce lane merging friction and reduce congestion headed east on Denny Way to Capitol Hill.

 

Route 8 WB on Denny Way, at Aurora | Image by Cait Sith Productions, Caitsith810 – YouTube

 

Comprehensive and coordinated planning over the last four years has focused on better reliability for this key route in this location, and on sections of Route 8 in Lower Queen Anne, South Lake Union, and Capitol Hill. Besides enhanced Route 8 reliability, the change is also expected to benefit riders by:

  • Keeping more buses running on time, which in turn…
  • Reducing bus-bunching (jamming up at a bus stop);
  • Reducing wait times at important transfer locations (e.g. Capitol Hill Link); and
  • Making transit a more attractive travel option for crosstown travel in some of Seattle’s densest neighborhoods.

 

Capacity for mobility is critical, as Seattle growth continues, from 608,660 people in 2010 to more than nearly 730,000 in 2018 (click chart image for more details).

Seattle population growth chart | https://bit.ly/2MwIxAj

 

Much of the employment growth in downtown Seattle since the recession has been in South Lake Union, and Route 8 is a crucial connection for residents to access jobs, cultural destinations, and housing in central Seattle.

 

Crush loads…

The seated capacity of Metro’s 60-ft articulated coaches is 56 passengers, with a so-called ‘crush load’ equating to about 90- riders. As Route 8 riders likely know, crush loads are frequent during afternoon peak periods on this section of Denny, as are long wait times. Speeding up bus travel also provides operational savings to Metro and City-funded bus service.

 

#Make8LessL8!

The new bus lane is one piece of a set of improvements intended to enhance Route 8 speed and reliability. Although the changes are not expected to completely solve the reliability problems currently experienced on Route 8, together they should offer noticeable improvement.

Denny Substation Project, Aug 23, 2018 | Image by Seattle City Light | seattle.gov/light/dennysub | John St on left; Denny Way on right.

 

Originally expected to be installed last year, we accommodated Denny Substation construction needs and are now implementing the design. The reconfiguration project is expected to finish Tuesday, August 28.

 

What you can expect:

This afternoon crews begin placing and bagging (until project completion) new signage between Fairview and Stewart.

Beginning at 7 AM Saturday, August 25, the team will hydro-blast (weather & equipment dependent) the street surface to remove existing street configuration markings; and then paint the new lines.

The moving operation will create additional, temporary lane closures through Saturday afternoon. Work is scheduled again Monday and Tuesday, 9 AM – 3 PM, to complete the project.

 

August 24, Friday | Noon – 3 PM | Closures
Crews need 1 – 2 rolling lane closures, and at times may be able to use those already in place for construction on both sides of Denny Way.

 

August 25, Saturday | 7 AM – 3 PM | Closures
As crews progress with mobile operations, there will be 1 – 2 rolling lane closures.

 

Monday August 27 and Tuesday, August 28 | 9 AM – 3 PM | Closures
Expect rolling lane closures during work hours, to finish project.

 

Thank you for your patience during this mobile operation!

 

Contact us!

Email us at construction.coordination@seattle.gov or call 206-684-ROAD (7623). Information subject to change. 

Volunteers needed to advise on development plans for Kaiser Permanente

Here’s your chance to advise the City on the development plans of the Kaiser Permanente campus. Seattle Department of Neighborhoods is seeking interested community members from surrounding neighborhoods to participate on the Kaiser Permanente Standing Advisory Committee (SAC). This committee provides feedback on projects planned and under development by the hospital to ensure it complies with its Master Plan. The Master Plan describes zoning rules, long range planning of the property, and transportation planning.

Community members who have experience in neighborhood organizing and issues, land use and zoning, architecture or landscape architecture, economic development, building development, medical services, or just an interest in their neighborhood’s future are encouraged to apply.

The committee meets in the evenings at the campus four to six times a year. Committee members serve a two-year renewable term. If you are interested in serving on this committee, send a letter of interest by either e-mail or regular mail by Monday, July 30 to: 

Maureen Sheehan

E-mail: Maureen.Sheehan@seattle.gov

Mailing Address:  Seattle Department of Neighborhoods; P.O. Box 94649; Seattle, WA 98124-4649

For more information contact Maureen Sheehan, Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, at 206-684-0302.


The City of Seattle is committed to promoting diversity in its boards and committees; women, young adults, senior citizens, persons with disabilities, sexual and gender minorities, persons of color, and immigrants are highly encouraged to apply.

The Major Institutions and Schools Program provides a way for neighbors of Seattle’s hospitals, universities, and colleges to be directly involved in the development plans for those institutions to ensure neighborhood concerns are considered when those plans are made. It is a program of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods.

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Small Business of the Month: SugarPill

Walking into SugarPill apothecary feels a little like you’re walking out of Seattle’s Capitol Hill and into a shop in Diagon Alley. Most days you’ll find SugarPill owner and founder Karyn Schwartz behind the counter, who opened the shop in 2011.

Schwartz is a homeopath and herbalist with a background in everything from social work to kitchen work; she’s had “a circuitous route towards being a business owner,” as she puts it. “What all of my experience added up to was not a lot of job opportunities aside from private practice, but a deep desire to remain in the public sphere where I could teach people what I know—so eventually I had to create a job for myself,” she explains. “SugarPill is my way of taking all the things I have learned and that I am interested in, and offering them in my own way, in my own aesthetic, in a place where you can find me in person.”

SugarPill sells a unique assortment of natural remedies as well as teas, chocolates, bitters and more—not that the food items aren’t remedies too. Schwartz’s favorite product in the store right now are chocolate-covered sesame toffee squares, “because they are also medicinal.”

Customers can expect to get detailed, personalized advice about the products they buy when they come to SugarPill: “My primary focus is on whoever is in here, in person, talking to me, and trying to understand what they need and what I can safely help them with,” Schwartz says. “We do very intimate consultations here, even while tending to all the basic chores of retail, such as ordering, stocking, cleaning, paying bills, answering the phones and responding to mountains of messages.”

Schwartz has staff to run the store a couple days a week, so that she’s able to have days off, but most of the time she’s a one-woman operation. Everything with a SugarPill label on it is made by Schwartz, and every product she carries from other vendors has won her personal approval.

As a queer business owner operating in Capitol Hill, Schwartz has watched the changes in her neighborhood closely over her seven years in business. “It’s hard to predict, or even plan, what will happen in a city that is changing so rapidly, and forcing so many communities out of their own neighborhoods,” she says. “That really takes a toll on brick and mortar businesses, as we rely on our communities to support us—and exist to support our communities—so I am hoping that the city will refocus on what—and who—is already here, and do more to preserve the fabric of community which cannot be replaced by shiny new everything.”

SugarPill has a long-standing relationship with the Office of Economic Development, which strives to act as an advocate for businesses as they navigate both neighborhood growing pains and the bureaucratic web of local government. “It’s so important to have people to talk to who understand the challenges of being a very small business owner, and who also understand the importance of very small business at a time when very large ones have so much influence over our lives,” she says of her relationship with OED staff.

Being a small business owner in a rapidly-changing Seattle is challenging, but Schwartz hopes to keep SugarPill going for years to come and is planning a “little re-launch” of the store later this year. Schwartz says SugarPill celebrates Pride month “by letting people know how proud we are to be a queer-owned business.”

“I love being involved in art projects, such as the “Still Here, Still Queer” projection piece that I spearheaded a few years ago. I always try to have some kind of installation in our windows, and, of course, we are here all weekend with the door wide open, happy to welcome people to the gayborhood.”

If you’re thinking about starting a small business, Schwartz has a few pieces of advice: “Love what you do. Take good care of yourself, and don’t be too proud to ask for help. Do something that matters to the world that you live in. Remember who you are, how you got here, and always give back to those who helped you along the way.” (Speaking of asking for help—you can always reach out to the Office of Economic Development for free consulting and support.)

You can experience SugarPill at 900 E Pine Street, and follow them on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Landmarks Preservation Board to consider nomination of the Highland Apartments for landmark status

Seattle’s Landmarks Preservation Board will consider nomination of the Highland Apartments (931 11th Avenue E) in Capitol Hill on Wednesday, June 20 at 3:30 p.m. The meeting will be held in Seattle City Hall (600 4th Avenue, Floor L2) in the Boards & Commissions Room L2-80.

The public is invited to attend the meeting and make comments regarding the nomination. Written comments are also accepted and should be received by the Landmarks Preservation Board at the following mailing address by 3:00 p.m. on June 19:

Seattle Landmarks Preservation Board
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
PO Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124-4649

A copy of the Landmark Nomination is available for public review at the Capitol Hill Branch Library (425 Harvard Avenue East) and the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods’ office in Seattle City Hall, 600 4th Avenue, 4th Floor (206-684-0228). It is also posted on Department of Neighborhoods website, under the heading of “Current Nominations.”

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Landmarks Preservation Board to consider nomination of P.J. Sullivan House for landmark status

Seattle’s Landmarks Preservation Board will consider nomination of the P.J. Sullivan House in Miller Park located at 1632 15th Avenue on Wednesday, December 20 at 3:30 p.m. The meeting will be held in Seattle City Hall (600 4th Avenue, Floor L2) in the Boards & Commissions Room L2-80.

The public is invited to attend the meeting and make comments regarding the nomination. Written comments should be received by the Landmarks Preservation Board at the following mailing address by 3:00 p.m. on December 19:

Seattle Landmarks Preservation Board
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
PO Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124-4649

A copy of the Landmark Nomination is available for public review at the Capitol Hill Branch Library (425 Harvard Avenue E) after November 30 and the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods office in Seattle City Hall, 600 4th Avenue, 4th Floor (206-684-0228). It is also posted on the Department of Neighborhoods website, under the heading of “Current Nominations.”

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