Only in Seattle Newsletter – August 2018

The Only in Seattle newsletter is designed to share resources and information with leaders in Seattle’s neighborhood business districts.

In this edition:

  • Invitation to summertime social – Peer Networking at Tai Tung;
  • SODO’s track mural is the longest in the world;
  • Ballard’s Sidewalk Sale is this weekend;
  • Funding opportunities for business districts;
  • Neighborhood Events;
  • and more!

View this newsletter in your browser

Mayor Murray, Paul G. Allen announce partnership to provide $35 million to support homeless families

Today, Mayor Ed Murray and philanthropist Paul G. Allen announced a partnership to address the region’s homelessness crisis through an innovative, permanent supportive housing and onsite services community that will serve as a resource hub for Seattle-area families with children who are experiencing homelessness. Under the partnership, Mr. Allen will provide $30 million in capital toward the development, with the City of Seattle committing $5 million in capital and additional funds to support operation and maintenance of the center.

“Paul Allen understands the homelessness crisis requires everyone in our community, particularly our business leaders, to help,” said Mayor Murray. “This partnership with the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation will build permanent supportive housing for vulnerable homeless families with children and help the City leverage our affordable housing funds 6-to-1. This commitment is an example of the incredible difference our philanthropic and business leaders can make in our community, as I called on others to do during my State of the City speech this year. Thank you to Paul Allen, his family, and the foundation for making this incredibly generous investment to address this crisis.”

“We should all be alarmed by the growing crisis of homelessness in our community, especially its impact on families,” said Bill Hilf, CEO of Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc. “Addressing this crisis requires the commitment and creativity of business, government, and the human services community. We approached the City of Seattle some months ago to get this project going because we wanted to make a significant impact toward disrupting the cycle of homelessness, and to give homeless families an opportunity to thrive.”

Mercy Housing Northwest, one of the nation’s largest non-profit developers of affordable housing operating 48 properties in Washington state, will develop, own, and operate the multi-family complex. It is anticipated that other nonprofit providers will partner to provide services for children and families in the community.

“This remarkable partnership between Paul Allen and the City of Seattle will make lasting opportunities for families most in need,” said Bill Rumpf, President of Mercy Housing Northwest. “We are grateful for the opportunity to create affordable apartments and a family service center where parents and children can get out of homelessness, regain resilience and dignity, and pursue economic mobility.”

There are currently 1,684 families awaiting housing in King County and more than 3,498 homeless students enrolled in Seattle Public Schools who experienced homelessness during the 2015-2016 school year. According to the Homeless Needs Assessment, 43 percent of homeless adults experienced homelessness before the age of 25. Through a mix of housing and onsite services, this project aims to assist families experiencing homelessness, helping them transition to stable housing and break the cycle of homelessness. This development aligns with the guidelines identified in Mayor Murray’s Pathways Home plan and aims to address needs often cited by homelessness service provides, advocates, and people experiencing homelessness.

Additional details about the design, location, and target opening date for the community will be released in the coming months.

More: Read the letter of intent between partners

About Paul Allen
Paul G. Allen is a Microsoft cofounder, entrepreneur, and philanthropist who explores the frontiers of technology and human knowledge, and works to change the future. Through the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation and his organization Vulcan Inc., Mr. Allen is working to save endangered species, improve ocean health, tackle contagious diseases, research the human brain, and build sustainable communities. All told, Mr. Allen’s philanthropic contributions exceed $2 billion. As a member of the Giving Pledge, he remains committed to giving away the majority of his fortune. For more information, please visit www.paulallen.com.

About Mercy Housing Northwest
Mercy Housing Northwest creates stable, vibrant and healthy communities for Washington state residents. They build homes, transform lives and help individuals, families and seniors thrive by providing permanent housing with supportive services. Mercy Housing Northwest was formed 25 years ago by five women’s religious communities: the Tacoma Dominicans, the Adrian (Edmonds) Dominicans, the Sisters of Providence, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace and the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary. MHNW is the northwest arm of Mercy Housing, one of the largest affordable rental housing providers in the US. Mercy Housing owns 48 affordable housing properties in Washington, serving approximately 5,000 people each year. For more information, please visit www.mercyhousing.org/washington.

The post Mayor Murray, Paul G. Allen announce partnership to provide $35 million to support homeless families appeared first on Mayor Murray.

Mayor Murray calls on local employers to connect more youth with jobs

Today, Mayor Ed Murray announced a new directive extending participation in the Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative (MYEI) to all City departments. The announcement marked the launch of 2017 employer recruiting efforts for the program, which connects Seattle youth ages 14-24 with paid internships and employment opportunities. Last year, 17 City departments collectively hired more than 500 interns through MYEI which includes the Seattle Youth Employment Program. These efforts, combined with support from the private sector, served a total of 3,500 youth, a seven-fold increase over 2014.

Several of the city’s largest employers – including Novo Nordisk, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle Children’s Research Institute, and the Port of Seattle – hired interns through the initiative last year and have committed to participate again in 2017.

“One of the most important experiences a young person can have is on-the-job training and connections to a professional network,” said Mayor Murray. “Our youth employment initiative connects thousands of young Seattleites to job opportunities and helps address significant racial disparities by improving access for youth of color. This program only works with the support of the city’s employers and I encourage more to get involved by opening internship positions in their own companies or funding positions at non-profit organizations.”

At 12 percent, the youth unemployment rate is almost four times the city’s overall rate, according to the 2014 American Community Survey. For low‐income youth, young people of color, and youth who aren’t in school, the unemployment rate is as high as 28 percent. To address these challenges, in 2014 Mayor Murray piloted MYEI to build career pathways for Seattle youth.

“Participating employers provide vital opportunities for the young people they hire through this initiative, and they are also laying the foundation for an inclusive, equitable economy,” said Brian Surratt, Director of Seattle’s Office of Economic Development. “Investing in local talent is the best way to fill Seattle’s employee pipeline.”

To learn more and register your organization to participate in the initiative, visit murray.seattle.gov/youthjobs.

The post Mayor Murray calls on local employers to connect more youth with jobs appeared first on Mayor Murray.

Mayor Murray Directs Negotiation of Civic Square Deal, Proceeds to Fund Equitable Development and Affordable Housing

Today, Mayor Ed Murray sent a mayoral directive to Finance and Administrative Services (FAS) to negotiate the sale of the Civic Square project to Bosa Development and direct the proceeds to establish a new Equitable Development Fund. The sale would also net $5.7 million in funds for affordable housing, meeting or exceeding the Mandatory Housing Affordability (MHA) program requirement. Combined, nearly $22 million from this sale will go to equity and affordability projects around the City.


“Seattle is growing and we are working to ensure that it happens in a way that is equitable, benefiting everyone who lives and works here,” said Mayor Murray. “The sale of the Civic Square property allows us to leverage our resources to invest in communities most at-risk for displacement and to make a major investment in affordable housing. While we continue to revitalize our downtown core, we are strategically investing around the city to strengthen our communities for the future.”

The Equitable Development Fund will be established with the $16 million in proceeds from the sale, and used as part of the Equitable Development Initiative (EDI), which helps ensure Seattle’s existing residents and businesses also enjoy the benefits of development around the city, rather than being displaced by it. These funds will go to community-driven projects such as a cultural center for long-time residents to maintain neighborhood character or a job training program focused on good-paying jobs in the community.

The Office of Planning and Community Development and FAS will work with Council and the community to develop a plan for using the net proceeds from the sale. The additional $5.7 million will go to the Office of Housing to leverage other funding for building affordable housing.

The agreement with Bosa Development replaces the 2007 agreement with Triad Civic Center LLC, which had been hindered by the economic recession and a lack of capital partners. Under the terms of the new agreement, Bosa will develop a residential tower that will include the Civic Square Plaza, as well as retail space. The City will maintain the rights to approve the final design. The City expects to send the agreement to Council for approval in early 2017, with the expectation that it will be finalized by June. Construction would start in 2018.

“Bosa’s vision for this project is slightly different than what was originally planned, which is why the City believes it has a greater chance to succeed,” said FAS Director Fred Podesta. “Office space construction in this area has brought a new and higher demand for housing and public amenities, and Bosa is bringing that to the table. We believe this site is the perfect location to meet that need, as it is close to transit and vibrant, diverse neighborhoods, including Downtown, Pioneer Square, the Chinatown-International District and First Hill.”

Watch the press conference here

The post Mayor Murray Directs Negotiation of Civic Square Deal, Proceeds to Fund Equitable Development and Affordable Housing appeared first on Mayor Murray.

Mayor Murray Directs Negotiation of Civic Square Deal, Proceeds to Fund Equitable Development and Affordable Housing

Today, Mayor Ed Murray sent a mayoral directive to Finance and Administrative Services (FAS) to negotiate the sale of the Civic Square project to Bosa Development and direct the proceeds to establish a new Equitable Development Fund. The sale would also net $5.7 million in funds for affordable housing, meeting or exceeding the Mandatory Housing Affordability (MHA) program requirement. Combined, nearly $22 million from this sale will go to equity and affordability projects around the City.


“Seattle is growing and we are working to ensure that it happens in a way that is equitable, benefiting everyone who lives and works here,” said Mayor Murray. “The sale of the Civic Square property allows us to leverage our resources to invest in communities most at-risk for displacement and to make a major investment in affordable housing. While we continue to revitalize our downtown core, we are strategically investing around the city to strengthen our communities for the future.”

The Equitable Development Fund will be established with the $16 million in proceeds from the sale, and used as part of the Equitable Development Initiative (EDI), which helps ensure Seattle’s existing residents and businesses also enjoy the benefits of development around the city, rather than being displaced by it. These funds will go to community-driven projects such as a cultural center for long-time residents to maintain neighborhood character or a job training program focused on good-paying jobs in the community.

The Office of Planning and Community Development and FAS will work with Council and the community to develop a plan for using the net proceeds from the sale. The additional $5.7 million will go to the Office of Housing to leverage other funding for building affordable housing.

The agreement with Bosa Development replaces the 2007 agreement with Triad Civic Center LLC, which had been hindered by the economic recession and a lack of capital partners. Under the terms of the new agreement, Bosa will develop a residential tower that will include the Civic Square Plaza, as well as retail space. The City will maintain the rights to approve the final design. The City expects to send the agreement to Council for approval in early 2017, with the expectation that it will be finalized by June. Construction would start in 2018.

“Bosa’s vision for this project is slightly different than what was originally planned, which is why the City believes it has a greater chance to succeed,” said FAS Director Fred Podesta. “Office space construction in this area has brought a new and higher demand for housing and public amenities, and Bosa is bringing that to the table. We believe this site is the perfect location to meet that need, as it is close to transit and vibrant, diverse neighborhoods, including Downtown, Pioneer Square, the Chinatown-International District and First Hill.”

Watch the press conference here

The post Mayor Murray Directs Negotiation of Civic Square Deal, Proceeds to Fund Equitable Development and Affordable Housing appeared first on Mayor Murray.