Public art projects honored by Americans for the Arts Public Art Network Year in Review

Americans for the Arts honored 49 outstanding public arts projects created in 2017 through the Public Art Network Year in Review program, the only national program that specifically recognizes the most compelling public art. Chosen by public art experts, the roster of selected projects include three from Seattle’s Public Art Program.

The three projects that were recognized are:

Vessels by Nicole Kistler: Vessels are a series of cast iron sculptures that dot the community garden on Seattle Public Utilities property at Beacon Reservoir. Building on the inspiration of the reservoir as a container, they evoke puffball mushrooms holding spores, berries holding seeds, seed pods, and ceramic water jugs. The sculptures also hold stories from the community. Kistler interviewed Beacon Food Forest volunteers and neighbors over several summer months capturing food stories and traditions on audio and imbedded phrases into the permanent works. Commissioned with Seattle Public Utilities 1% for Art Funds.

BorderLands: The first exhibition ARTS organized at King Street Station, BorderLands featured 2D- and 3D works from the City’s collection as well as site-specific installations. The exhibition, focusing on themes of belonging and resistance, was on view on the third floor of King Street Station.

Poetry on Buses, a collaboration with 4Culture and funded through Seattle Public Utilities 1% for Art funds: Poetry on Buses invited King County residents to create, share, and experience poetry on public transit, online, and in community on the theme “Your Body of Water.”

Dating back to 1992, Poetry on Buses was reimagined in 2014 to foster relationships with immigrant and undeserved communities, featured multiple languages, and transformed the commute for culture—on bus and on smartphone. The 2017-18 program was multi-modal and featured poetry in nine languages.

“The best of public art can challenge, delight, educate, and illuminate. Most of all, public art creates a sense of civic vitality in the cities, towns, and communities we inhabit and visit,” said Robert L. Lynch, president and CEO of Americans for the Arts. “As these Public Art Network Year in Review selections illustrate, public art has the power to enhance our lives on a scale that little else can. I congratulate the artists and commissioning groups for these community treasures, and I look forward to honoring more great works in the years to come.”

The projects selected for Year in Review can be viewed on this page and were on display throughout the Annual Convention. Three independent public art experts—Bryan Lee, Jr., director of design at Colloqate Design in New Orleans; Karen Mack, executive director of LA Commons in Los Angeles; and Denver artist Patrick Marold—discussed the trends they uncovered while examining hundreds of submissions in selecting this year’s choices for the most exemplary, innovative permanent or temporary public art works created or debuted in 2017. This is the 17th year that Americans for the Arts has recognized public art works.

Americans for the Arts is the leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education in America. With offices in Washington, D.C., and New York City, it has a record of more than 55 years of service. Americans for the Arts is dedicated to representing and serving local communities and creating opportunities for every American to participate in and appreciate all forms of the arts. Additional information is available at www.AmericansForTheArts.org.

 

beyond BorderLands: a weekend of artist conversations at King Street Station

 

303 S. Jackson St., Top Floor, Seattle, WA 98104

Photo by Sunny Martini

BorderLands explores the concepts of belonging and resistance throughout the third floor of King Street Station with 2D- and 3D works from the City’s collection and immersive installations. The exhibition is free and open to the public, and is accompanied by a range of related programming including lectures, performances, and engagement activities on Saturdays through the run of the show, a schedule is available at seattle.gov/arts/borderlands

Saturday, October 7, 2017, 2 – 5 p.m.
BorderLands Community Response Center
Admission is free, RSVP here

The BorderLands Community Response Center will be an afternoon of workshops, discussions, art-making, and healing led by artist Pedro Lasch at King Street Station with representatives from regional artists and community organizations including:

  • 21 Progress
  • Black Prisoners Caucus
  • artist Marita Dingus – healing through doll-making
  • artist Henry Luke – protest sign-making
  • NW Immigrant Rights Project
  • Red Eagle Soaring

Sunday, October 8, 2017, 3 – 6 p.m.
Artist Talk, and performance
Admission is free, RSVP here

The afternoon will include an artist talk by Pedro Lasch, a 20X20 presentation by local artists and a performance of Abstract Nationalism curated by Evan Flory-Barnes. Artist presentations will be followed by a community celebration.

20X20 presentations by:

  • Humaira Abid
  • Anida Yoeu Ali
  • C. Davida Ingram
  • Deborah Lawrence
  • Ries Niemi
  • Carina del Rosario
  • Brenetta Ward
  • Inye Wokoma

beyond BorderLands: a weekend of artist conversations at King Street Station

 

303 S. Jackson St., Top Floor, Seattle, WA 98104

Photo by Sunny Martini

BorderLands explores the concepts of belonging and resistance throughout the third floor of King Street Station with 2D- and 3D works from the City’s collection and immersive installations. The exhibition is free and open to the public, and is accompanied by a range of related programming including lectures, performances, and engagement activities on Saturdays through the run of the show, a schedule is available at seattle.gov/arts/borderlands

Saturday, October 7, 2017, 2 – 5 p.m.
BorderLands Community Response Center
Admission is free, RSVP here

The BorderLands Community Response Center will be an afternoon of workshops, discussions, art-making, and healing led by artist Pedro Lasch at King Street Station with representatives from regional artists and community organizations including:

  • 21 Progress
  • Black Prisoners Caucus
  • artist Marita Dingus – healing through doll-making
  • artist Henry Luke – protest sign-making
  • NW Immigrant Rights Project
  • Red Eagle Soaring

Sunday, October 8, 2017, 3 – 6 p.m.
Artist Talk, and performance
Admission is free, RSVP here

The afternoon will include an artist talk by Pedro Lasch, a 20X20 presentation by local artists and a performance of Abstract Nationalism curated by Evan Flory-Barnes. Artist presentations will be followed by a community celebration.

20X20 presentations by:

  • Humaira Abid
  • Anida Yoeu Ali
  • C. Davida Ingram
  • Deborah Lawrence
  • Ries Niemi
  • Carina del Rosario
  • Brenetta Ward
  • Inye Wokoma

August Programs at BorderLands

BorderLands Aug. 3 – Oct. 29, 2017
King Street Station 303 S. Jackson St.
Seattle, WA 98104

Hours: Fridays: 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Saturdays: 12 – 6 p.m.
Sundays: 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
1st Thursdays, Sept 7; Oct 5, 5 – 8 p.m.

August programs (all events are free and take place in the BorderLands exhibition)

Saturday, August 19, 1-2:30 p.m. Teen Workshop: Make Your Own Protest sign with artist Henry Luke RSVP here    

How can text strengthen the message that you seek to convey? Teens ages 13 -18 are invited to come and create their own protest signs and learn about styles of calligraphy, textography and letterform from artist and activist, Henry Luke. Materials to create are provided, but teens should come with something in mind that they want to say and will be guided in how to think about visually communicating their own message through text. Free, but registration requested; spots limited to 12 per workshop.

 

 

Saturday, August 26, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. MARKED URGENT: Art for processing and responding to challenging times

Join interdisciplinary artist, writer and educator, Beverly Naidus as she leads participants through the process of making art for social change. Emphasis will be placed on how we process the current state of the world; how we personally are responding to climate change, racism, xenophobia, misogyny, homophobia, fascism and more, and how our art can encourage constructive actions that emerge from the collective. Participants are encouraged to develop their own stories, images, texts, sounds, gestures and projects. All levels of art experience welcome.