Mayor Murray statement on President Trump’s ban on transgender people from serving in the United States military

Today, Mayor Ed Murray issued the following statement after President Trump banned transgender people from serving in the United States military:

“In the last 24 hours, the Trump administration’s ugly agenda has been on full display and we should not be surprised. This White House has never been interested getting things done for America. They are all about undoing—such as taking away healthcare for millions of poor Americans and now stripping transgender people of their rights. The Trump administration is undoing this nation’s commitment to equity and spirit of community that makes America great.

“The President’s attack on transgender people is a shameful, despicable, and unacceptable attempt to marginalize an entire community of Americans. Serving one’s country is a patriotic calling that every single American, including the thousands of transgender people who currently serve, have the right to aspire to. Taking away that right is antithetical to the American value of equality and Seattle’s unwavering commitment to protect and promote the rights of the transgender community. If we’ve learned anything from the chilling history of the 20th century, it is that attempts to marginalize entire populations cannot be taken lightly. This inclusive city does not take it lightly.”

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Mayor Murray statement on President Trump’s ban on transgender people from serving in the United States military

Today, Mayor Ed Murray issued the following statement after President Trump banned transgender people from serving in the United States military:

“In the last 24 hours, the Trump administration’s ugly agenda has been on full display and we should not be surprised. This White House has never been interested getting things done for America. They are all about undoing—such as taking away healthcare for millions of poor Americans and now stripping transgender people of their rights. The Trump administration is undoing this nation’s commitment to equity and spirit of community that makes America great.

“The President’s attack on transgender people is a shameful, despicable, and unacceptable attempt to marginalize an entire community of Americans. Serving one’s country is a patriotic calling that every single American, including the thousands of transgender people who currently serve, have the right to aspire to. Taking away that right is antithetical to the American value of equality and Seattle’s unwavering commitment to protect and promote the rights of the transgender community. If we’ve learned anything from the chilling history of the 20th century, it is that attempts to marginalize entire populations cannot be taken lightly. This inclusive city does not take it lightly.”

The post Mayor Murray statement on President Trump’s ban on transgender people from serving in the United States military appeared first on Mayor Murray.

Mayor Murray statement on President Trump’s ban on transgender people from serving in the United States military

Today, Mayor Ed Murray issued the following statement after President Trump banned transgender people from serving in the United States military:

“In the last 24 hours, the Trump administration’s ugly agenda has been on full display and we should not be surprised. This White House has never been interested getting things done for America. They are all about undoing—such as taking away healthcare for millions of poor Americans and now stripping transgender people of their rights. The Trump administration is undoing this nation’s commitment to equity and spirit of community that makes America great.

“The President’s attack on transgender people is a shameful, despicable, and unacceptable attempt to marginalize an entire community of Americans. Serving one’s country is a patriotic calling that every single American, including the thousands of transgender people who currently serve, have the right to aspire to. Taking away that right is antithetical to the American value of equality and Seattle’s unwavering commitment to protect and promote the rights of the transgender community. If we’ve learned anything from the chilling history of the 20th century, it is that attempts to marginalize entire populations cannot be taken lightly. This inclusive city does not take it lightly.”

The post Mayor Murray statement on President Trump’s ban on transgender people from serving in the United States military appeared first on Mayor Murray.

Mayor Ed Murray announces Fair Chance Housing policy to ensure access to opportunity and housing for all

Mayor Ed Murray announces Fair Chance Housing legislation to increase access to housing by reducing barriers faced by those with arrest and conviction records.

Mayor Ed Murray sent legislation to Council this week aiming to increase racial equity in housing to ensure everyone has access to opportunity. Among other steps, Fair Chance Housing would prevent landlords from screening applicants based on criminal convictions more than two years old, and prohibit the use of advertising language that categorically excludes people with arrests or conviction records. Today’s announcement is a recognition of years of work by the community supporting a policy that will increase racial equity in access to housing, help keep families together, and build stronger, more inclusive communities.

“The growth in the number of Americans with criminal records has created a crisis of housing inaccessibility that is disproportionately felt by people of color,” said Mayor Murray. “Not only has our criminal justice system punished Black Americans disproportionately, they continue to be punished by barriers to housing that cut off access to opportunity. Ensuring people have fair access to housing is about equity and about ensuring everyone has the ability contribute in our society, including getting a good job and raising a family.”

Announcing Fair Chance Housing legislation aimed at reducing barriers to housing.

Posted by Mayor Ed Murray on Wednesday, June 21, 2017

An estimated 1 in 3 Americans has a criminal record and nearly half of all children in the United States have at least one parent with a criminal record. It is estimated that 30 percent of Seattle residents over 18, or more than 173,000 people, have an arrest or conviction, with 7 percent having a felony record. Each of these people face significant barriers to housing because of current policy, denying them access to a basic need that would help them be successful. One study found that 43 percent of Seattle landlords are inclined to reject a tenant with a criminal history. All Home, which coordinates homelessness services for King County, found that 1 in 5 people who leave prison become homeless shortly after.

The Fair Chance Housing ordinance would prevent landlords from screening applicants based on criminal convictions older than two years; arrests that did not lead to a conviction; convictions that have been expunged, vacated or sealed; juvenile records; or status of a juvenile tenant on the sex offender registry. Landlords will not be able to use language in advertisements that categorically excludes people with arrests or conviction records and must provide a business justification for rejecting an applicant based on their criminal history. Fair Chance Housing is one of the dozens of recommendations in Mayor Murray’s Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda (HALA) meant to address public safety and racial equity in housing by lowering barriers for those re-entering society, who are disproportionately people of color.

“You can’t say everyone has a fair chance to succeed when we have a criminal justice system that disproportionately arrests and convicts people of color,” said Councilmember Lisa Herbold (District 1, West Seattle & South Park). “Fair Chance Housing is about giving people fair opportunities. This legislation is about addressing a homelessness crisis that we have created ourselves because we are not giving everyone a fair chance.”

Seattle has previously taken steps to lower barriers to housing, a key recommendation in HALA after years of community advocacy, and an essential component of the City’s plan to address homelessness, Pathways Home. These include Source of Income Discrimination legislation that protects people using alternative sources of income to pay rent and the coordination with funders of homeless services to reduce and standardize screening criteria for programs. People impacted by previous policies have advocated for the City to address these barriers for years, including hundreds of who spoke at community forums and the Fair Chance Housing Stakeholder Committee convened last year. Today’s announcement is the culmination of that work, as the City works to lower barriers to housing and ensure Seattle remains affordable and accessible.

“If part of the American Dream is to own a home, what message are we sending to people who cannot even rent, even after they have paid their debt to society?” said Augustine Cita, Workforce Development Director, Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle. “We need to fix that.”

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Mayor Murray’s remarks from Liberty Bank Groundbreaking

Remarks as Prepared for Delivery

Liberty Bank Groundbreaking

June 19, 2017

Today was supposed to be a day of celebration for Seattle’s African American community.

On Juneteenth, we were scheduled to be here in the heart of Seattle’s historic Black neighborhood breaking ground on the future Liberty Bank Building, an inspiring community driven project that includes $12.2 million in City dollars to turn Seattle’s economic success into a model for inclusion rather than gentrification.

And while all of that is true, we are here today, grieving. Again.

Grieving over yet another devastating encounter between an African American family and the police.

Grieving over yet another death in the African American community.

Seattle’s Black community is hurting. Seattle’s Black community is angry.

This is a painful part of our city’s history — the hurt and the anger that the Black community has endured for decades. For too long.

All of America is grieving. Sunday’s shooting follows the painful Philando Castille verdict in Minnesota

But your deep sense of injustice and your deep dissatisfaction have led to action.

Your activism and collaboration with the City led to the landmark and historic police accountability legislation I signed last month.

That legislation gives civilians an unprecedented, independent oversight role of investigations into police conduct.

Of course, that does not bring Charleena Lyles back.

Like all of us, her family is now plagued with questions about this shooting, from technical policing questions to philosophical and moral questions.

Sadly, African American families may now be questioning whether they should even call the police during emergencies. An unacceptable, but real dilemma that undermines just governance. And points to the ultimate question that continues to define all these tragedies: This city is asking itself what factor race played in the death of Charleena Lyles.

That is not meant as a judgment, but as the reality of the type of questions we must be asking.

Under this new era of accountability, yesterday’s police shooting will be thoroughly investigated.

The pressing questions about how and why this happened will be answered. Must be answered.

Must be answered for her family and her children.

Must be answered for all who are grappling with this tragedy, particularly for the African American community.

You are grieving today, and I am committed to an exhaustive investigation of this shooting.

We are committed to the well-being, the civil rights, and the success Seattle’s African American community.

That’s why we are here today at the site of the Liberty Bank Building, the future home of a development that will include more than 100 units of affordable housing.

I want to congratulate all the partners who made this project happen.

Today, we are not simply breaking ground on another Seattle construction project.

We are breaking ground on a project that “gets it.” We are breaking ground on Seattle’s steadfast commitment to equity.

The First Bank Building is named after the first Black-owned bank West of the Mississippi, which opened its doors on this spot in the heart of the Black community in 1968.

We will build 115 units of affordable housing here.

While the city’s economy is booming, I have simultaneously been concerned that too many are being priced out of the city they love. Nowhere is this more acute than in the Central Area.

But an uncompromising tenet of this city is that growth must be accompanied by inclusion.

That’s a lofty goal. Fortunately, our Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda puts teeth into it: We are now mandating that developers contribute to affordable housing every time they build.

This unprecedented policy couples economic growth with housing affordability.

In the case of Liberty Bank, funded in part by City housing levy dollars from the Office of Housing, this fight for inclusion explicitly and proudly recognizes the Central Area’s unique history.

And that means recognizing its legacy businesses, religious institutions, organizations, and longtime residents.

The agreement for this new development makes a high-priority commitment to secure long-term African American ownership for the building, and that the bottom floor commercial space will support and develop African-American businesses.

But policy alone cannot guarantee success stories like today’s.

Guaranteeing and achieving inclusion also takes perseverance and partnerships. In fact, there’s no way to be inclusive without forming partnerships.

I applaud Centerstone, Black Community Impact Alliance, Africatown, and Capitol Hill Housing for your perseverance on behalf of this community, and for establishing a partnership that not only prioritized affordability, but also prioritized this City’s values.

Your partnership demonstrated that a community can shape the way it grows and changes — can shape how Seattle grows and changes.

I’d also like to also thank my Office of Economic Development for their role to support the growth and development of black-owned businesses in the Central Area, and for identifying black-owned contracting firms.

This historic partnership may be a first, but it cannot be the last. And it will not be the last. Mark my words, you have established a new standard. Call it the equity standard.

I now turn it over to Chris Persons, Executive Director of Capitol Hill Housing, to continue to mark this very special day.

Thank you.

 

 

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