Seattle Channel wins national Excellence in Government Programming award

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 27, 2016

Contact: Lori Patrick, Seattle Channel Communications

lori.patrick@seattle.gov, (206) 733-9764

 City-operated TV station wins 15 awards in national competition

SEATTLE— Seattle Channel was named the best municipal television station in the nation when it received the prestigious Excellence in Government Programming award from the National Association of Telecommunications Officers and Advisors (NATOA) at the group’s annual meeting held in Austin, Texas, last week.

Additionally, the city-operated station won 13 government programming awards, including five first-place wins for programming as well as a first-place award for its use of social media.

NATOA honors excellence in broadcast, cable, multimedia and electronic programming produced by local government agencies. This year, NATOA received more than 850 entries submitted in 67 categories by local governments across the country.

“Seattle Channel is an important resource,” said Mayor Ed Murray. “The station’s in-depth programming provides transparency and accountability in city government, sparks civic engagement and helps deepen understanding of local issues and Seattle’s diverse communities.”

This is Seattle Channel’s seventh NATOA win in 10 years for programming excellence. Seattle Channel competed against other government-access TV stations in large U.S. cities. The station was recognized with the top government-programming award in 2007, 2008, 2010, 2012, 2014 and 2015.

“Seattle Channel continues to be the highest standard in local government programming,” said Seattle City Council President Bruce Harrell. “I am proud of what Seattle Channel does every day in providing transparent and informative programming connecting our residents to the city’s civic, cultural and community events.”

Seattle Channel programs that won first-place awards include the public-affairs program City Inside/Out with Brian Callanan; the showcase of Seattle’s creative scene Art Zone with Nancy Guppy; Civic Cocktail, civic conversations with a twist; and Community Stories, which features documentaries about Seattle’s inspiring people, programs and cultural traditions.

“Our staff is committed to building strong, engaged and inspired communities through compelling content and quality production,” said John Giamberso, Seattle Channel general manager. “It’s an honor to receive this recognition from our national peers in local government.”

Here is a listing of Seattle Channel’s 2016 NATOA awards:

Excellence in Government Programming

First Place

Public Affairs: City Inside/Out – Homelessness http://www.seattlechannel.org/CityInsideOut/episodes?videoid=x61637

Interview/Talk Show: Civic Cocktail http://www.seattlechannel.org/CivicCocktail/episodes?videoid=x61635

Arts and Entertainment: Art Zone with Nancy Guppy http://www.seattlechannel.org/ArtZone/episodes?videoid=x62379

Profile of a City/County Department: CityStream – Solar in Seattle

http://www.seattlechannel.org/explore-videos?videoid=x55663

Documentary: Community Stories – Massive Monkees: The Beacon http://www.seattlechannel.org/CommunityStories?videoid=x62211

Use of social media: Seattle Channel communications/web team

 

Second Place

Ethnic Experience: Community Stories – An American Hero: Shiro Kashino http://www.seattlechannel.org/CommunityStories?videoid=x59988

Profile of a City/County Department: CityStream – City of Seattle Paid Parental Leave and Gender Pay Equity http://www.seattlechannel.org/explore-videos?videoid=x60344

Public Education: Citizen University TV – Democracy Vouchers

http://www.seattlechannel.org/CitizenUniversityTV?videoid=x62151

Editing: Seattle Channel production staff

 

Third Place

Election Coverage: City Inside/Out – Council Elections (District 3 Debate)

http://www.seattlechannel.org/CityInsideOut/episodes?videoid=x58520

Visual Arts: Art Zone with Nancy Guppy—Show Open http://www.seattlechannel.org/artZone?videoid=x67963

Magazine Format Series: CityStream http://www.seattlechannel.org/feature-shows/citystream

Honorable Mention Seniors: CityStream – Senior Self Defense http://www.seattlechannel.org/explore-videos?videoid=x57404

Seattle Channel is a local TV station that reflects, informs and inspires the community it serves. Seattle Channel presents programs on cable television – channel 21 on Comcast (321 HD) and Wave (721 HD) – and via the Internet to help residents connect with their city. Programming includes series and special features highlighting the diverse civic and cultural landscape of the Pacific Northwest’s premier city.

Proposed Seattle Information and Technology Budget 2017-2018

A Message from City of Seattle’s Chief Technology Officer: 

Today Mayor Murray presented his proposed 2017-18 Budget to the City Council.

This has been a year of transition for the City’s technology functions and staff. The creation of the Seattle Information Technology Department (Seattle IT) provided an opportunity to create the City’s first unified technology budget and provided clarity into IT spending. Creating this budget is no small feat – it required merging 16 budgets into one, coordinating with finance staff from across departments to clarify and align disparate accounting treatments, and standing up a new financial management tool. While many of the methods remained the same, the 2017-18 Seattle IT budget proposal will represent a clean start for how we manage technology spend.

This first consolidated budget is aligned with five strategic priorities that will help advance Seattle IT’s ability to deliver on its objectives and advance technology across the City.

  • System and service maturity. Many of Seattle IT’s services have not evolved at the same pace as the technology advances of the past decade, nor are investments being made to automate service delivery or improve service levels. Focusing on service and system maturity will lower ongoing operational costs and improve the customer experience. The proposed budget includes funding to ensure the City maintains an acceptable level of security and can be more proactive in responding to security threats. It also adds resources to improve the City’s identity management and mobility service offerings – key components in maturing our application and infrastructure operations.
  • Smart, data-driven City. Data has the potential to drive innovation and efficiency, improving both our quality of life and economic productivity.  Unlocking the promise of a smart, data-driven city requires a focus on data governance, consistent tools that facilitate cross-department collaboration, and educating the public on how to leverage the City’s resources. In the 2017-2018 proposed budget, projects such as Seattle Police Department’s data analytics platform and the Human Services Department data-to-decisions database will help those departments make data-driven decisions to improve their services. In addition, investments in our civic technology, open data, and business intelligence programs will allow the City to engage the public and collaborate on solutions that improve our quality of life.
  • Digital Equity. Internet access and the skills necessary to be successful online are vitally important to Seattle residents. In 2016 the City put forth specific strategies and actions, developed by our community-led Digital Equity Action Committee, to bridge this digital divide.  The Initiative is one part of the Mayor’s broadband strategy to increase access, affordability, and public-private-community partnerships. The proposed budget includes additional positions to deliver on our digital equity strategies. In addition, the Mayor’s Youth Participatory budget program allocated funds to increase the number of Wi-Fi hotspots available through the Seattle Public Library’s checkout program, increasing the number of homes that will have internet access.
  • Public experience. Technology can greatly improve the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of government services by facilitating, automating, and streamlining interactions among the public, government employees, service providers, and other stakeholders. The proposed budget includes funding to expand the use of a customer engagement and relationship system and a new grant application system to improve the City’s engagement with the public. The budget also expands the Citywide web team.
  • Optimization. Seattle IT was created to increase the value delivered from the City’s information technology investment. Shared IT functions provide common strategy, structure and key enterprise services across City government.  Through funding in the proposed 2017-18, we will continue to optimizing the department’s structure and change how the City develops and operates applications. We will also continue to invest in enterprise architecture, business relationship management, resource management, and project portfolio management.

 

In total, the 2017 Proposed Operating Budget for Seattle IT is $203 million with another $42 million in our Capital Improvement Program. Read the Mayor’s budget speech at http://murray.seattle.gov/.

 

I’m proud of our Seattle IT team for all of their achievements in our first six months working together as a new department and excited for what we will achieve through Mayor Murray’s proposed 2017-18 budget. Together we will deliver powerful technology solutions for the City and public we serve.

 

Sincerely,

Michael Mattmiller, CTO

 

Seattle Public Utilities and Seattle Information Technology Partner to Give Watershed Radio Communications a Boost

Cedar River Watershed

At Seattle Public Utilities (SPU), safety is always top of mind. For field employees, this means following certain protocols to avoid hazards and reduce the chances that an accident will occur. Less obvious, but just as important, is the role of reliable radio communications.

For much of Seattle Public Utilities’ service area, especially where population density is high, the radio communication system functions extremely well. This is not always the case in the Cedar River Watershed, where SPU staff and contractors are working on the Chester Morse Lake Pump Plant (MLPP) project. A lack of existing infrastructure and interference from the Cascade Mountains make communications difficult. SPU has long recognized the need to install better communications capabilities should the MLPP crew need to reach the Cedar Falls office or other crews in the event of a hazardous materials spill or an accident involving personnel. Thanks to a strong One Team effort from SPU and other City departments, a more reliable system is finally at hand.

Plans for getting a permanent communications system installed have been in the works for some time. Earlier this spring, SPU was close to finalizing a deal to lease space on a radio site in the Rattlesnake Ledge area, which the department does not own. Just weeks before the system was to be installed, the landlord became totally unresponsive, and SPU had to scramble. Ultimately, staff from the SPU Watershed Protection and Operations teams, SPU Emergency Management group, and City of Seattle IT department were able to work together to come up with a viable solution.

Traditionally, the infrastructure necessary for radio communication includes a tower, power source, and structure to house electronics, but none of these exist on site at Chester Morse Lake.

“We wanted to use tools that were already in place without overburdening the staff,” says Ned Worcester, head of SPU’s Emergency Management team. “With the help of Seattle IT and our engineering consultant, we did some computer modeling to determine viable radio sites, and the watershed staff validated them for access and maintenance potential.”

Next, Emergency Management set to the task of finding existing equipment to install on the chosen site. They rounded up radio equipment provided by Seattle IT, including an outdoor equipment cabinet salvaged from the roof of a Seattle Fire Department station. Seattle IT tested the equipment, mounted an antenna, and transported everything to the Watershed. SPU Watershed staff then delivered everything to the chosen site.

All that remained was finding a viable power source to run the equipment. Initially, the watershed team utilized four car batteries, hauling two at a time to the site. But the batteries had to be swapped out every day for charging, which required several hours of labor.

To save time and money, SPU began exploring alternatives. Emergency Management asked Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) staff for ideas. They proposed solar and secured bids from contractors, but all required too much manufacturing lead time.

Eventually, Watershed Operations staff came up with the idea for a thermo-electric generator (TEG). SPU owned two TEGs that were previously used for instream flow monitoring. The TEG utilizes propane to heat up platinum wire that produces electricity. Operations staff removed one of the TEGs from storage to fire up, configure, and transport to the remote site, along with a 500-gallon propane tank.

Additionally, the new radio channel had to be programmed into all of the radios at Cedar Falls. This required coordination between the Seattle IT radio shop technicians and SPU Watershed Protection staff to round up and physically program all of the portable and vehicle radios.

In just three days, SPU’s teams retrieved the radio equipment and Seattle IT’s radio shop provided a repurposed cabinet to house the equipment on site, helped find radio channels, tested and programmed the equipment, and mounted the antenna. These efforts took place on a Friday and over the weekend, and represented additional work for all staff involved.

Thanks to the collective efforts of SPU and Seattle IT staff, ratepayers save money, watershed radio coverage is improved, and operations are now safer and more efficient.

“This was a quintessential One Team effort and an example of what it takes to maintain communications that keep our employees safe and operations running smoothly,” says Worcester. “Several departments worked together to assemble a pilot radio communications system that can be replicated each year. We’re already planning how to create a physical site to be deployed year-round or seasonally.”

Seattle IT’s New Director of Security, Risk, and Compliance: Dena Solt

Dena Solt:  Director of Security, Risk and Compliance

Feeling insecure these days?  You could talk to a therapist—or you could get a dose of security from Seattle IT’s new Director of Security, Risk, and Compliance, Dena Solt. “Questions, concerns, and ideas are always welcome, so please send me a note or stop by,” Dena says. “I am passionate about risk and compliance management and I genuinely love what I do.”

Hired in July, Dena fills the final position on Seattle IT’s Executive Team where she leads the effort to keep the City’s—and its customers’—data secure and privacy protected.  To do that, Dena sees her challenge as “responding to day-to-day security and privacy matters while getting an understanding of the vast and complex City of Seattle, its systems and operations.”  One of her first priorities is to develop a prioritized and cohesive multi-year strategic plan for the City’s information security, risk, compliance, and privacy program—a plan that will ensure information assets are stored and protected in a manner that meets or exceeds corporate, compliance and regulatory requirements, and builds the public’s trust in government.

That/s a tall order for somebody still new to the City of Seattle; Dena acknowledges that success depends on “developing, and empowering a team of proactive, collaborative, knowledgeable individuals to help carry out the plan.”  She says she feels fortunate that her staff and the other Seattle IT employees she has met are “incredibly talented, knowledgeable, and dedicated.” One of the first accomplishments in building out the new Security, Risk, and Compliance team was the appointment of Chief Information Security Officer Jeff Brausieck, who will be joining the team on August 10th.

While Dena may be new to the City, she is not new to her role.  She comes to Seattle IT with more than eighteen years of experience in technology, information security, risk management, compliance, and privacy.  She has worked on four continents and lived in South Africa prior to moving to the state of Washington thirteen years ago.  A Certified Information Security Auditor, she has assisted a wide range of public and private sector organizations, participated in various security industry initiatives, and served as Director of Corporate Risk and Compliance for drugstore.com/Walgreens, where she managed security, privacy, compliance, internal audit, payment processing, and IT finance.

When she’s not working, Dena enjoys adventure travel, photography (she is now venturing into astrophotography,) and spending time with friends and family, including her 20-year-old son when he is home from college.

Both personally and professionally, Dena sees Seattle IT as a great fit. “I decided to join Seattle IT after meeting Michael Mattmiller and the IT leadership team who I can now proudly refer to as my colleagues,” she notes. “I whole-heartedly believe in the vision and direction and simply could not turn away from the opportunity to work with you all to tackle the challenges, mitigate the risks, and be part of the solution.”

Seattle Channel Wins Two Regional Emmy Awards

SEATTLE CHANNEL, Cable 21

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 6, 2016

Contact: Lori Patrick, (206) 733-9764
lori.patrick@seattle.gov

               

Station recognized for historic/cultural programming

SEATTLE – Seattle Channel is the recipient of two Northwest Regional Emmy Awards for historic/cultural programming, one for a segment about the Georgetown Steam Plant and another for an animated short film about a local World War II veteran.

 

The city-operated station was recognized Saturday, June 4 at the Northwest Chapter of the National Academy of Arts & Sciences’ (NATAS) Emmy Awards ceremony.

 

“Seattle Channel’s in-depth coverage of City Hall and Seattle’s diverse communities helps residents stay informed, engaged and connected with their city,” said Mayor Ed Murray. “I congratulate the station on its work and its commitment to inspiring civic engagement.”

 

A CityStream story about the Georgetown Steam Plant, now the Georgetown PowerPlant Museum, won in the historic/cultural segment category. A blast from Seattle’s past, the plant was built in 1906 mostly to power the city’s electric streetcar system. The segment was produced, photographed and edited by Ralph Bevins. Watch the winning segment: http://www.seattlechannel.org/explore-videos?videoid=x57291.

 

Shiro Kashino, a World War II veteran who grew up in Seattle’s Central District, is the subject of an animated short film, An American Hero: Shiro Kashino, which won in the historic/cultural program category. The feature, part of Seattle Channel’s Community Stories series, draws from the graphic novel Fighting for America: Nisei Soldiers, written by Lawrence Matsuda and illustrated by Matt Sasaki. The piece was produced and directed by Shannon Gee, animated by Randy Eng, with audio engineering and sound design by Thomas Cavit and writing by Lawrence Matsuda. Watch the winning feature: http://seattlechannel.org/CommunityStories?videoid=x59988.

 

“Seattle Channel is a catalyst that helps bring people together and develop a better understanding of our changing city,” said Seattle City Council President Bruce Harrell, chair of the Council’s Education, Equity and Governance Committee. “The station’s inclusive programming features a variety of voices on subjects ranging from public policy to the people and cultural traditions that comprise Seattle.”

 

In the 53rd annual Northwest Emmy Awards, Seattle Channel competed against commercial and public television stations in the Northwest NATAS five-state region which includes Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. This year, the station received 17 Emmy nominations in program categories including overall station excellence, arts/entertainment, health/science, politics/government, interview/discussion, promotion/program campaign as well as photography and editing.

 

“Seattle Channel is committed to producing quality content with depth and impact,” said John Giamberso, Seattle Channel general manager. “Our public-affairs programs spark informed civic dialogue and our arts features and documentaries entertain and inspire. I applaud our talented team for its dedication to excellence in local programming.”

 

Seattle Channel is a local TV station that reflects, informs and inspires the community it serves. Seattle Channel presents programs on cable television – channel 21 on Comcast (321 HD) and Wave (721 HD) – and via the Internet at seattlechannel.org to help residents connect with their city. Programming includes series and special features highlighting the diverse civic and cultural landscape of the Pacific Northwest’s premier city.