Seattle Animal Shelter recognizes World Rabies Day by encouraging you to protect your pet

In advance of the Sept. 28 World Rabies Day, which raises awareness of and promotes rabies prevention worldwide, the Seattle Animal Shelter is encouraging pet owners to do their part by vaccinating their pets. If your pet is not up to date on its rabies vaccination, make plans to come by the Seattle Animal Shelter’s “Protect Your Pet” license, rabies and microchip event, from 3-6 p.m. on the fourth Friday of each month. The next clinic is Friday, Sept. 25.

Bring your cat or dog to the shelter, located at 2061 15th Ave. W., Seattle, and receive a free rabies vaccination with the purchase or renewal of the pet’s license during this event. These monthly events are held in partnership with Good Neighbor Vet, which provides the vaccinations in its mobile unit.

“Up-to-date pet licenses, vaccinations and microchips are essential, easy ways to protect our pets,” notes Don Jordan, Seattle Animal Shelter director. “Pet licenses often work hand in hand with microchips to help us get lost pets home safely, and license fees support the lifesaving work of our shelter. Vaccinations save lives by preventing the spread of disease. Our goal is to save lives, and these are ways that pet owners can help.”

Rabies is a deadly virus that can affect both people and animals, but is preventable. Owners can prevent the spread of rabies by vaccinating pets and keeping them away from infected wildlife. According to the Washington State Department of Health and Public Health – Seattle & King County, bats are the primary carriers of rabies in Washington state. Just two summers ago, a rabid bat was found in Madison Park in Seattle. Though rabies cases are rare, it is important to vaccinate pets to prevent them from contracting and spreading the disease if they come into contact with infected wildlife.

Cats and dogs are required to be licensed and vaccinated against rabies under Seattle Municipal Code 9.25.050 and Washington Administrative Code 246-100-197. One- to two-year pet license fees range from $20 to $37 for spayed and neutered pets and $30 to $69 for unaltered pets.

The Protect Your Pet events offer services on a first-come, first-served basis. All dogs must be leashed, and all cats must be in carriers. Previous vaccination records are not required, but you are encouraged to bring them, if available. Additional vaccinations and microchips will be available for an added fee.

For more information and updates, please see www.seattleanimalshelter.org and www.goodneighborvet.com.

Seattle Animal Shelter and Lynnwood Honda invite you to “Fall in Love with a Pre-Owned Pet”

The Seattle Animal Shelter and Lynnwood Honda invite you to a free weekend barbecue and to “Fall in Love with a Pre-owned Pet,” this Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Lynnwood Honda, 22020 Highway 99, Edmonds. Come by for the barbecue, meet some of Seattle Animal Shelter’s adoptable dogs, cats and critters, and learn about shelter programs, including fostering pets in your home and how to obtain a pet license or low-cost spay/neuter surgery.

The animals at Saturday’s event will be available for on-site adoptions, for a special $15 fee.

“The Seattle Animal Shelter has incredible animals in need of forever homes,” said Don Jordan, shelter director. “I hope this special price encourages folks to consider adopting one of the animals we’ll feature on Saturday. This is a great opportunity to save a life and add immeasurable joy to your family.”

With regular adoption prices ranging from $15 to $145 (plus applicable license fees), this promotion offers up to $130 in savings. The adoption fee includes:

  • Certificate for free health exam at local veterinarians
  • Initial vaccinations
  • Spay or neuter
  • Microchip
  • Deworming
  • Feline Leukemia and Feline Immunodeficiency virus testing (cats only)
  • Two cans of food

For Seattle residents, a two-year pet license must be purchased with each adoption. The license fee is $27 for cats and $37 for dogs. Critter adoptions do not require licensing.

In a partnership with the Seattle Animal Shelter, from now through the end of the year Lynnwood Honda will be making a donation to the shelter for every new car test drive.

“Lynnwood Honda has been a generous contributor to the Seattle Animal Shelter,” Jordan said. “We look forward to joining Lynnwood Honda’s staff and customers this weekend for what is sure to be a fun event. We appreciate this opportunity that we hope will result in finding loving homes for our animals.”

The Seattle Animal Shelter, located at 2061 15th Ave. W., is open Tuesday through Sunday, noon to 6 p.m. for adoptions and licensing. For more information, call 206-386-7387 (PETS), or view animals available for adoption online at www.seattleanimalshelter.org. Adoptable pets are also featured on “Pet of the Week” on the Seattle Channel at http://www.seattlechannel.org/CityStream/Pets.

Seattle Animal Shelter reminds pet owners to protect pets from the heat – leave animals at home while attending Hempfest this weekend

With warm temperatures expected for the annual Hempfest celebration this weekend, the Seattle Animal Shelter is reminding pet owners to exercise good judgment and leave pets at home.

Pets, besides service animals, are not allowed at Hempfest. According to the festival’s website, there is no safe place to leave or secure your pet at the event. Seattle Animal Shelter Director Don Jordan pleaded with pet owners to leave their animals at home while attending Hempfest and warned against leaving animals in vehicles.

“It’s not worth the risk,” Jordan said. “Cars in direct sunlight can reach fatal temperatures within just a few minutes, and on hot days even dogs left in the shade with the windows cracked are at risk of brain damage or death.”

Jordan also reminds pet owners that even on a 70-degree day, cars left in the sun can turn into lethal ovens, and, with the movement of the sun, cars originally left in the shade can soon be in direct sunlight.

Additionally, a new Washington law that went into effect last month makes it a violation just to leave an animal unattended in a vehicle or enclosed space, if the animal could be harmed or killed by exposure to excessive heat or cold, lack of ventilation or lack of water. Penalties under the new law are in addition to potential animal cruelty charges.

Jordan said that humane law enforcement officers responding to calls about animals left in hot cars will utilize all means necessary to access vehicles to remove the animals.

If you are bringing your service animal to Hempfest, make sure that it is not exposed to toxic substances and be sure that it has access to plenty of water during the festival.

The Seattle Animal Shelter offers the following tips for protecting pets during hot weather:

  • Never leave your animal tethered or kenneled in direct sunlight. Provide a shady area for retreat, such as a dog house, porch or shady tree, and always provide access to plenty of cool water.
  • If you leave animals indoors, open the screened windows, keep a fan running, provide plenty of water, and if possible, leave them in a cool location.
  • Never leave dogs or cats unattended in a closed, locked vehicle. Animals do not perspire like humans; they cool themselves by panting. Vinyl, leather and even cloth seats in vehicles get hot under animals’ feet and prevent them from perspiring through their paws.
  • If you must travel with your pet, carry water. If a trip requires you leave your pet in the car at any point, think about saving that for another day. It’s not worth the risk.
  • Avoid overexerting your animal in hot weather. Exercise is fine when taken in moderation, but obesity, old age, underlying disease and previous bouts of heat stroke can predispose an animal to the condition.
  • For birds, take caution and place the bird’s cage away from direct sunlight during the intense heat of the afternoon. Provide water and fruits and vegetables with high moisture content.

If you see an animal that may be in need of assistance, or if you have questions, contact the Seattle Animal Shelter at (206) 386-7387 (PETS).

Seattle Animal Shelter reminds pet owners to protect pets from the heat

The Seattle Animal Shelter is once again reminding pet owners to take proper precaution during the hot weather expected for the next two weeks. With temperatures forecasted to reach the low 90s, pet owners are encouraged to exercise good judgment and use common sense when it comes to protecting their pets from the heat.

Never leave your animal unattended in a vehicle, said Seattle Animal Shelter Director Don Jordan. Even on a 70-degree day, cars left in the sun can turn into lethal ovens, reaching fatal temperatures of more than 100 degrees within just a few minutes. And with the movement of the sun, cars originally left in the shade can soon be in direct sunlight.

“Even dogs left locked in cars in the shade with the windows cracked on hot days are at risk of brain damage or death. Dogs must cool themselves through panting and their systems can’t handle high temperatures,” Jordan said. “You may think your dog will be okay because you’ll only be a minute, but it’s just not worth the risk.”

Jordan also reminds pet owners that a new Washington law will soon be in effect that makes it a violation just to leave an animal unattended in a vehicle or enclosed space, if the animal could be harmed or killed by exposure to excessive heat or cold, lack of ventilation or lack of water. Penalties under the new law are in addition to potential animal cruelty charges.

The warm weather also creates hazards for cats. As many homes in the Northwest aren’t equipped with air conditioning due to the normally moderate climate, people leave their windows open during warm weather. The fresh air is essential to you and your pets, but be aware of the enticement and danger an open, screenless window can pose for cats.

“Make sure your window screens are secure, especially on second floors and above,” Jordan said. “Open, screenless windows are an invitation to tempt the old adage ‘curiosity killed the cat.’ They may be known for always landing on their feet, but those little paws are no match for the combination of hard ground and gravity when the fall begins six, or even two, stories up.”

Jordan offers the following tips for protecting pets during hot weather:

  • Never leave your animal tethered or kenneled in direct sunlight. Provide a shady area for retreat, such as a dog house, porch or shady tree, and always provide access to plenty of cool water.
  • If you leave animals indoors, open the screened windows, keep a fan running, provide plenty of water, and if possible, leave them in a cool location.
  • Never leave dogs or cats unattended in a closed, locked vehicle. Animals do not perspire like humans; they cool themselves by panting. Vinyl, leather and even cloth seats in vehicles get hot under animals’ feet and prevent them from perspiring through their paws.
  • If you must travel with your pet, carry water. If a trip requires you leave your pet in the car at any point, think about saving that for another day. It’s not worth the risk.
  • Avoid overexerting your animal in hot weather. Exercise is fine when taken in moderation, but obesity, old age, underlying disease and previous bouts of heat stroke can predispose an animal to the condition.
  • For birds, take caution and place the bird’s cage away from direct sunlight during the intense heat of the afternoon. Provide water and fruits and vegetables with high moisture content.

If you see an animal that may be in need of assistance, or if you have questions, contact the Seattle Animal Shelter at (206) 386-7387 (PETS).

Seattle Animal Shelter hosts “Cool City Pets” Saturday, June 20

Have you been thinking about adding a pet to your family? Perhaps you don’t have the space for a dog or maybe someone in your household is allergic to cats. The Seattle Animal Shelter has the perfect solution: start small.

Come on down to the shelter on Saturday, June 20, for Cool City Pets, an adoption event highlighting small animals looking for their forever homes. From 1-3 p.m., potential adopters can meet the many small animals available for adoption from the shelter, including: rabbits, hamsters, guinea pigs, rats, birds, reptiles, ferrets, mice and more.

Volunteer small-animal specialists will be on hand to help adopters find the right pet for them. They provide information about each animal’s characteristics and needs, demonstrate basic care and handling skills, and answer questions. The Seattle Animal Shelter features Cool City Pets the third Saturday of every month.

All ages are welcome, but children must be accompanied by an adult. Animals may be adopted by adults only. Adopters must be prepared to provide proper housing, food, water, toys and other materials necessary for the care and good health of the animal. The adoption fee for small animals ranges from $15-$40.

The Seattle Animal Shelter, located at 2061 15th Ave. W., is open Tuesday through Sunday, noon to 6 p.m. for adoptions and licensing. For more information, call 206-386-7387 (PETS), or view animals available for adoption online at www.seattleanimalshelter.org. Adoptable pets are also featured on “Pet of the Week” on the Seattle Channel at http://www.seattlechannel.org/CityStream/Pets.

The Seattle Animal Shelter reserves the right to approve or deny any animal adoptions and limits the number of small animal adoptions to no more than three per household.