100 Deadliest Days

More teenagers are killed in vehicle crashes during the 100 days between Memorial and Labor Day than during any other time of the year. This is on top of the fact that more teens are killed due to vehicle crashes than in any other type of trauma-related death.

What makes the next 100 days so dangerous for teens?

  • Teens drive more during the summer for recreational activities.
  • They are more likely to have passengers in their vehicles.
  • Alcohol consumption at parties or other events.
  • Driving later in the evening than they are used to.
  • Driving routes that they are less familiar with.

What can be done to protect teens and others on the road?

  • Talk to your teen and set expectations on their driving.
  • Remind teens about the dangers of distracted driving.
  • Discuss when, where, and with whom they can drive.
  • Know whether their driver’s license has restriction on it about passengers and driving times.
  • Set a good example as a parent by not texting, not speeding excessively, and not talking on your cell phone while driving.

Parents and teens should also be aware that in the last year, Governor Jay Inslee signed a new, more restrictive, distracted driving bill, primarily aimed at cell phones. The bill now prohibits handheld uses, including composing or reading any kind of message, picture, or data. Photography while driving is illegal. Drivers also cannot use handheld devices while at a stop sign or while stopped at a signal light.

Your firefighters want everyone to have an enjoyable summer. By following the law and reducing risk, our community can have a safe one as well.

Content credit: Puget Sound Regional Fire Authority