Seattle’s sixth parklet opens in Uptown; More parklets and ‘streateries’ sidewalk cafes coming

Today, the City of Seattle announced the launch of the next phase of the Parklet Program at the opening of Seattle’s sixth parklet in the Uptown neighborhood. These small public spaces along city streets will be coming to more neighborhoods, and the city will begin partnering with restaurants to launch a new type of sidewalk cafe called “streateries” in Seattle.

Mayor Murray joined members of the Uptown Alliance, KEXP, SIFF (Seattle International Film Festival) and neighborhood residents to celebrate the opening of a new public space next to SIFF Cinema. A former parking spot, the Uptown parklet features colorful seating and fencing, a mini library and bike parking. Hosted by the Uptown Alliance, the parklet was funded by private donations and will be maintained by the community.

“Neighbors love parklets because they contribute to a vibrant, active street scene,” said Murray. “We look forward to seeing more of these community gathering spots throughout the city.”

During Seattle’s 18-month Pilot Parklet Program managed by the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) the public response to parklets, as well as the department’s evaluation of these spaces, indicates overwhelming support for the program. As of today, the program will transition out of its pilot phase and into a permanent, ongoing initiative. The City will be accepting new applications for parklets through March 20.

Murray also announced a new Streateries pilot program that will be managed by SDOT. Streateries are like parklets except the sponsoring restaurant or bar can operate the space as a sidewalk café, providing space exclusively for their customers during their open hours of business. When the bar or restaurant is closed, the space will function as a parklet, open to everyone.

“Many restaurants want to open a sidewalk café, but just don’t have enough sidewalk to do it,” said Murray. “This new concept will support neighborhood businesses and add another interesting element to our street scene.”

SDOT will approve applications for up to 15 streateries under the pilot program. The sponsoring businesses will construct and maintain the area, and provide table service during their open hours. Applications for streateries are also due on March 20.

“Our Parklet Program has enhanced public space in Seattle by successfully partnering with the private sector,” said SDOT Director Scott Kubly. “Through our pilot Streateries Program, we will explore another potential partnership tool for supporting neighborhoods and their business districts.”

More information about the Parklet Program and the Streateries Pilot Program, including a new handbook with detailed information about the application process, is available at http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/parklets.htm.

The public is encouraged to share their comments on the program by emailing parklets@seattle.gov or writing to:  Seattle Department of Transportation, Attn: Public Space Management Program, PO Box 34996, Seattle, WA 98124-4996.